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CazP

Big Number finds on a single day

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I have seen that there are award coins/pin badges for 24/48/72/100 finds in a day.

 

I have managed 24 in a day and it was a long day, great walk though.

 

I am curious how others go about collecting so many in a day, is it all down to planning a high numbered route, or doing a midnight to midnight caching run.

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I have seen that there are award coins/pin badges for 24/48/72/100 finds in a day.

 

I have managed 24 in a day and it was a long day, great walk though.

 

I am curious how others go about collecting so many in a day, is it all down to planning a high numbered route, or doing a midnight to midnight caching run.

 

The "high numbered route" (aka "power trail") is the key.

 

The key to insanity. :laughing:

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Like it was mentioned, they do power trails. In my city one couple did 500 caches, including 150-200 puzzles in 24 hours. That was spread over 4 or 5 different trails. When you go for giant trails, like 1000 you can get even more in a day.

 

There are other ways to boosts those numbers, such as one cacher starting on one end, and another starting on the other end, and they sign each others names, so they can do it in half the time. Some people (like me) consider this cheating. But either way the power trails are key.

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I have managed 24 in a day and it was a long day, great walk though.

 

Walk? Walk? Get a bicycle, it's quicker!

 

A car will go even faster. :laughing:

 

Seriously. Choose an area with a lot of caches in. Plan your route.

Don't be surprised if you start to get bored along the way...

 

ETA.

Just checked your profile, and see you're in the UK.

Not so many 'Power Trails' here.

 

Cache trails can be found here > http://www.geocachetrails.com/

Edited by Bear and Ragged

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When I was new in 2006, I very quickly noticed I averaged 32 on most Saturdays. I'd walk out along a trail, do a few, then drive somewhere else and do some closer to the car. It was a lot of driving and I was putting in eight to ten hour days at times. But I was new and determined to get my find count up quickly so I wouldn't be seen as a hindrance to some cachers if I asked if I could come along with them. The leaders in the area had 2K, 1.5K, and 1.2K. Unfortunately, my activities seemed to coincide perfectly with people taking an interest in raising their find count, so my plan didn't work out well as that set the others against me because they began competing. People are ugly and nasty when they try to compete. I try to hide all my stats so I don't see that ugliness again.

 

Usually, when doing caching around that time and when I enter an area that doesn't have too many caches, I could average one every fifteen minutes (four an hour, forty in ten hours; sounds about right). This involved driving and turning on several roads, walking a short distance to the cache, looking around, and signing the log on the next line when I found the cache. On the opposite side of the spectrum are today's power trails. You'd be in a van with someone else driving on the roadside only the minimum distance between caches, you'd hop out within a few feet of the cache, switch out containers, hop back in the van, give the cache to someone else to stamp/sticker/sign, and you'd get the previous container you handed the person. You'd be ready to hop out in less time than it took me to type the previous sentence. I've been able to average and sustain cache every forty to forty-five seconds when I got into a good groove. It has been rare, but I've put in some days where my team started at 7AM, went through the night, and didn't stop until around 10PM the next day. That's tiring and rarely done with me because I'd rather look after my team and see that they're rested and fed properly! And then you have to consider emptying the bladder, refueling the vehicle, caches that are missing (DNFs take 3x as long, if not more, because you have to look around a lot more before you determine it's gone and replace the cache), and taking a few breaks for sanity's sake.

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(DNFs take 3x as long, if not more, because you have to look around a lot more before you determine it's gone and replace the cache), and taking a few breaks for sanity's sake.

 

Why not just assume they're all gone and replace them all on your way ... wouldn't that be faster yet? :blink:

 

I know I'm gonna get a lot of flak, but, IMO, Power trails .. the way they're played ... aren't really geocaching!

 

Just like Waymarking, it should be relegated to it's own website, and not count towards smiley count!

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Actually it's not the day you find the cache that count but the day you stamp them.

 

So you could just take a week, and simply, part-by-part, take all of the caches from some of the power trail home, open all of them, and open all logbooks on the floor.

 

Then, one day, you just stamp them all.

 

Then take another week to put them in place again. Or maybe they all will be replaced by throwdowns so you can skip this step and enjoy your high number of founds in one day.

 

You don't need to take that post fully seriously. It's just to point out how absurd some statistics (and the ways people 'do' them) are.

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I've actually been wondering how many caches others find, on average, per day / week / month / year? I'm a little over a month from the end of my first year, and I've found 94 caches total.

 

As it stands, I've found about 8.5 caches per month, and 2 per week. (Or, if you take out the months that I didn't do any caching because of a new baby, it comes to almost 19 per month, and about 5 per week.) I realize I'm a pretty casual geocacher, but I still wonder how that compares to others.

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I've actually been wondering how many caches others find, on average, per day / week / month / year? I'm a little over a month from the end of my first year, and I've found 94 caches total.

 

As it stands, I've found about 8.5 caches per month, and 2 per week. (Or, if you take out the months that I didn't do any caching because of a new baby, it comes to almost 19 per month, and about 5 per week.) I realize I'm a pretty casual geocacher, but I still wonder how that compares to others.

It really doesn't matter ...

If you're happy with how much you get to cache, then don't worry about others' numbers.

My best friend and caching buddy started caching almost a year after us, and he has 7800 caches to our 2200.

Doesn't bother us at all! He's been retired while we were still working.

Anyone who really cares and makes an issue about it don't matter.

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A car will go even faster. :laughing:

 

 

Also make sure you have new brake pads on the car before you start the power trail. The last thing you want to happen is to do half the trail and have the brakes wear out. Then it's like the whole day was just one big waste of time and money! :rolleyes:

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I've actually been wondering how many caches others find, on average, per day / week / month / year? I'm a little over a month from the end of my first year, and I've found 94 caches total.

 

As it stands, I've found about 8.5 caches per month, and 2 per week. (Or, if you take out the months that I didn't do any caching because of a new baby, it comes to almost 19 per month, and about 5 per week.) I realize I'm a pretty casual geocacher, but I still wonder how that compares to others.

I've seen people discuss the whole gamut. Other threads have discussed high numbers cachers, low numbers cachers and medium numbers cachers.

 

The people who have 10,000 finds or more must be finding 100+ caches per month, even if they started in the early days of caching.

 

Your find rate is good - you have the time to enjoy each find and write more than "TFTC." B)

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My record is 768 in one day, we started about 7 am, finish at 10 pm including lunch at a restaurant, checking into our hotel and a 2 hour nap mid day.

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There are other ways to boosts those numbers, such as one cacher starting on one end, and another starting on the other end, and they sign each others names, so they can do it in half the time. Some people (like me) consider this cheating. But either way the power trails are key.

 

I agree that is cheating. i thought the point of geocaching was the journey.

 

For me i work away for a few weeks and then back home for a few weeks. If i can get time off when away i will take a nice walk (not bike :) as the ship ones have a habit of falling apart), if there is a cache in the area i will wander that way. When i am home most of my friends work during the day, so i figure why not get out and do something, so geocaching is prefect for me. I enjoy finding the caches, if i can find a few in a day that makes me happy.

 

The last 2 days the weather has been beautiful in south east england, so i worked out a route and got a fair few church micros and any other caches on route. The idea of starting at one end and a friend the other sounds really quite dull to me - no fun journey.

 

Power trails sound interesting, are they usually easy hides as well?

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Power trails sound interesting, are they usually easy hides as well?
Yes, they're usually easy hides. And they're usually all the same, which makes them even easier to find (assuming the first gave you any difficulty). The whole point is to optimize the caches in the trail for speed: identical containers, identical hides, identical logs, minimum distance between caches, minimum distance between each cache and the road, owners that don't care if you use questionable "optimizations" like leapfrogging or three cache monte, etc. Edited by niraD

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Power trails sound interesting, are they usually easy hides as well?
Yes, they're usually easy hides. And they're usually all the same, which makes them even easier to find (assuming the first gave you any difficulty). The whole point is to optimize the caches in the trail for speed: identical containers, identical hides, identical logs, minimum distance between caches, minimum distance between each cache and the road, owners that don't care if you use questionable "optimizations" like leapfrogging or three cache monte, etc.

 

IMHO leapfrogging is cheating as you (and by you I mean the group in your car) didn't visit each GZ or sign every log book.

 

As for 3 cache monte, I feel it is acceptable for power trails (as long as the CO does not object via the cache page) as you visit each cache and sign each log book.

 

The only negative being (and can be quite a big negative) is caches not part of the PT get caught up in the practice and some cachers apply this technique to all caches.

 

NOTE: I have done a few PTs and never leapfrogged but have used the 3 cache monte technique although we were extremely carefull not to involve any caches not part of the PT we were doing.

Edited by Roman!

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I've actually been wondering how many caches others find, on average, per day / week / month / year? I'm a little over a month from the end of my first year, and I've found 94 caches total.

 

As it stands, I've found about 8.5 caches per month, and 2 per week. (Or, if you take out the months that I didn't do any caching because of a new baby, it comes to almost 19 per month, and about 5 per week.) I realize I'm a pretty casual geocacher, but I still wonder how that compares to others.

It really doesn't matter ...

If you're happy with how much you get to cache, then don't worry about others' numbers.

My best friend and caching buddy started caching almost a year after us, and he has 7800 caches to our 2200.

Doesn't bother us at all! He's been retired while we were still working.

Anyone who really cares and makes an issue about it don't matter.

 

I like numbers, averages, and statistics, so I'm interested.

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starting in Feb of 2001 I found 116 caches that year.

We did the first 300 of the original ET power in about 8 hours in 2010.

We did 475 caches of the route 66 power trail in about 10 hours in 2012.

When I was doing cache runs I'd usually start Sundays , hitting the first cache at daylight an going til I either get tired or bored, my best day normal caching was 59 caches.

I go through stages of burnout where I may not find any in a month or more, this year I think I've found about 57 caches

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Powertrails are fun, but I'm one of those who does not like to log a cache found if I have not actually located the cache with my own eyes.

 

My best day was 900 in one day - that was with 3 other friends in Nevada when we traveled there to do the entire ET highway series (2700 caches at the time). We did our research, various methods people used to find as many as possible quickly. We used what I think is the most common strategy - and only because the owners of the series allow and recommend finders do it. Two runners, a driver and a stamper. It was, as I like to say, very much like a marathon. All day, the same thing, over and over and over and over again. Mental concentration with a group of people all with the same goal, no one getting bored or wanting to quit :). We managed to get 900 on one day, starting before dawn and ending a bit after nightfall. We could have gone a bit longer, but we hadn't brought any extra gas, and didn't want to get stuck in the desert :( Our 900th to round it off was on our way back to our hotel.

No leapfrogging. Finding every cache. The recommended strategy if you're really going for speed is to switch each found container with the previous (now stamped) one, and if one is missing but it's clear where it was hidden, have extra containers and logs so you can replace it.

Great experience? Definitely! Amazing views, loads of fun, quite a number of older non-series caches along the way that we made efforts to locate as well. And while it was about numbers in that we wanted to find the entire series, it wasn't for numbers just to 'boost our stats', as many deride. We went for the experience, the fun, the camaraderie. And it was worth it :). I would certainly not compare that 900 cache day with someone else's high numbers hike day, which could be far more impressive. Context is everything.

 

But that trip was an exception.

Back to 'normal' geocaching, my best day was 201 with 5 other days above 100. But I also live in a region with many power trails, and caches everywhere :) . A few days have been just a full day of driving around the rural countryside to find quick roadside caches; we've been able to get up and around the 100-cache-day level even doing just that.

All this merely because I have a few friends who are very very active cachers who love to get out for very long days of just driving around or hiking very long trails :)

 

It's certainly possible to have days like that regularly, but it takes time, it can be exhausting, and definitely takes a mental endurance to just keep going.

 

We've had day counts ruined by DNFs as well, caches that were supposedly there but not, or trails composed of not-easy finds, causing us to spend a lot of time searching to no avail.

 

So getting numbers like that also takes research - making sure you're going to an area with caches are are actually findable. :P

Edited by thebruce0

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In the first year we managed 500 caches total. The next 500 took seven more years. Obviously we don't do any power trails! Our best day was 25 caches, and it involved a ten mile hike in the hills. It would have been 26 except for the durned rattlesnake at ground zero for one of the caches.

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I don't have a problem with power trails. I don't see why people cheat at them as they are already really easy. We passed by the route 66 on a trip to the geoart alien head. I wanted to pick some up to say we did it but not do a lot to mess up our numbers for the day. I think we picked up about 10 on our way there and about 10 on our way back. It was kind of fun but don't think I would want to spend all day doing it. Well maybe I would be OK with doing it for a day but was with my daughter and don't want to make her think geocaching is not fun. We had other plans to do.

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In the first year we managed 500 caches total. The next 500 took seven more years. Obviously we don't do any power trails! Our best day was 25 caches, and it involved a ten mile hike in the hills. It would have been 26 except for the durned rattlesnake at ground zero for one of the caches.

 

That sounds a bit like my find history. I got to 1000 in my first three years and have only found a little over 200 total in the 4+ years after that. I got 31 in a day in my second or third year only because I had a free day in the SF bay area where there are a lot more caches than there are where I live. I'm sure I'll never get more than 31 in a day, and my not ever reach 2000 finds and I'm okay with that. I'd much rather find caches in places I've never visited before, especially in new countries.

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People do really big (over 100) power trails not because the vicinity is awesome (although it sometimes is) or because the containers or masking is awesome (because it's not) but because of numbers.

 

They got quickly bored and force themselves to do it only for numbers, therefore the urge for cheats like monte or leapfrogging or couchlogging.

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People do really big (over 100) power trails not because the vicinity is awesome (although it sometimes is) or because the containers or masking is awesome (because it's not) but because of numbers.

 

They got quickly bored and force themselves to do it only for numbers, therefore the urge for cheats like monte or leapfrogging or couchlogging.

 

Yeah I'm sure you're right.

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Or, you know, because they're fun, with friends.

 

Some are with fun, but those who are cheating, are apparently not.

 

Otherwise they would just search for cache, log it and put it back, without any 'optimizations'.

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Yes, some will break etiquette (there is no "cheating" because there is no rule aside from what Groundspeak considers a 'find').

Unless they do something that hurts the experience of the next finder or the CO, then what does it matter?

If you're competing with them for numbers, then you enter into your own ruleset and really invite your own angst over how someone else plays compared to you.

 

Powertrails themselves are not 'bad'. People who enjoy powertrails do not inherently 'care about numbers'. People who have questionable geocaching search etiquette compared to other geocachers do indeed invite criticism and frustration from others. But if they do it their own way and are good about leaving caches in a condition that's positive for followup finders, then so what?

 

Leapfrogging? Generally bad etiquette. But if their name is in every log, it's a find. If they don't actually see half their finds, that's their loss, not ours.

 

What's fun is watching people who don't 'care about numbers' complaining about people who 'care about numbers' inflate their find count, then say they're cheating. What are they cheating? They're cheating themselves, that's all, unless they ruin the hides for the next people or the owner.

 

*shrug*

 

But yes, if we were all to stick to an agreed upon geocaching etiquette, then yeah, the world would be a better place :P

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Leapfrogging is more like couchlogging... it diminishes the value of finds count, but it does no direct damage.

 

But this monte caching, this is namely vandalism, because the caches are switched, which makes impossible to check if someone has really found the given cache or not.

 

People who plan to do the whole trail maybe doesn't see any problem here, but not everyone has so much pressure on smiles count, and switching caches makes a lot of damage here. Throwdowns too - if the cache exists, than nobody will know, what was found - the original or the throwdown.

 

Collegues that went do Danisch trail have said about large number of double and triple containers found in one place...

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But this monte caching, this is namely vandalism, because the caches are switched, which makes impossible to check if someone has really found the given cache or not.

Never heard that term, but I like it...

In this case the 'hurt' is more towards the CO; IF the CO desires to check the log for signatures.

In the case of the ET highway (not sure about the others in that area), this strategy is allowed and quite common, including 'throwdowns' (because the caches themselves are pretty much all clear and obvious; you get quite used to the "rock pile" by the road, for instance).

 

So really, I'd say there's generally accepted good etiquette for powertrail caching, and I'd say if you want to do something counter-etiquette, as it were, make sure there won't be any issues with the CO(s) :P (but be ready to take flack from other geocachers who care enough about their game to rip you a new one).

Or, you know, just use common sense and avoid all the drama :)

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I have managed 24 in a day and it was a long day, great walk though.

 

Walk? Walk? Get a bicycle, it's quicker!

 

A car will go even faster. :laughing:

 

Seriously. Choose an area with a lot of caches in. Plan your route.

Don't be surprised if you start to get bored along the way...

 

ETA.

Just checked your profile, and see you're in the UK.

Not so many 'Power Trails' here.

 

Cache trails can be found here > http://www.geocachetrails.com/

 

Just had a quick peek at SE area near you, I think. There are quite a lot of trails around Scaynes Hill on the A272.

A shame there are no canals down there as they are becoming more popular for long trails.

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I have seen that there are award coins/pin badges for 24/48/72/100 finds in a day.

 

I have managed 24 in a day and it was a long day, great walk though.

 

I am curious how others go about collecting so many in a day, is it all down to planning a high numbered route, or doing a midnight to midnight caching run.

Power trail. :)

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Like it was mentioned, they do power trails. In my city one couple did 500 caches, including 150-200 puzzles in 24 hours. That was spread over 4 or 5 different trails. When you go for giant trails, like 1000 you can get even more in a day.

 

There are other ways to boosts those numbers, such as one cacher starting on one end, and another starting on the other end, and they sign each others names, so they can do it in half the time. Some people (like me) consider this cheating. But either way the power trails are key.

I consider this cheating too <_<

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Power trails sound interesting, are they usually easy hides as well?
Yes, they're usually easy hides. And they're usually all the same, which makes them even easier to find (assuming the first gave you any difficulty). The whole point is to optimize the caches in the trail for speed: identical containers, identical hides, identical logs, minimum distance between caches, minimum distance between each cache and the road, owners that don't care if you use questionable "optimizations" like leapfrogging or three cache monte, etc.

 

IMHO leapfrogging is cheating as you (and by you I mean the group in your car) didn't visit each GZ or sign every log book.

 

As for 3 cache monte, I feel it is acceptable for power trails (as long as the CO does not object via the cache page) as you visit each cache and sign each log book.

 

The only negative being (and can be quite a big negative) is caches not part of the PT get caught up in the practice and some cachers apply this technique to all caches.

 

NOTE: I have done a few PTs and never leapfrogged but have used the 3 cache monte technique although we were extremely carefull not to involve any caches not part of the PT we were doing.

 

What is 3 cache monte?

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Powertrails are fun, but I'm one of those who does not like to log a cache found if I have not actually located the cache with my own eyes.

He said it :D

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What is 3 cache monte?
The three cache monte is when a team takes the original container, leaves a replacement container with a pre-stamped log, and stamps the log of the original container on the way to the next cache. The technique saves the time that would be required to open the cache, stamp the log, and close the cache, because these tasks are done in the vehicle while driving to the next cache.

 

It is also known as container swapping, swap-and-drop, and other names. I like the name "three cache monte" because it emphasizes the way the technique mixes up the containers/logs so that no one can find the original container/log for a given cache listing.

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If you want to use the rule of find the cache and sign the log then 3 cache monte is not cheating as every cache is found by everyone in the group and signed.

 

Leapfrogging on the other hand breaks the rules and thus I'd consider it cheating.

 

I have done a few PTs now and yes the numbers are a part of it, if they didn't count I wouldn't do them but I also wouldn't do them without friends or family or my camera or the memories I have from them. It's actually nice to rack up huge numbers and numerous memories as well.

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If you want to use the rule of find the cache and sign the log then 3 cache monte is not cheating as every cache is found by everyone in the group and signed.

 

Leapfrogging on the other hand breaks the rules and thus I'd consider it cheating.

 

I have done a few PTs now and yes the numbers are a part of it, if they didn't count I wouldn't do them but I also wouldn't do them without friends or family or my camera or the memories I have from them. It's actually nice to rack up huge numbers and numerous memories as well.

It does sound like a unique experience - *maybe* something to try once - but it would geopardize my coveted status as a "low-numbers cacher." If I did it, i'd need to create a sock account and lead a double life! :ph34r:

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If you want to use the rule of find the cache and sign the log then 3 cache monte is not cheating as every cache is found by everyone in the group and signed.

 

Leapfrogging on the other hand breaks the rules and thus I'd consider it cheating.

 

I have done a few PTs now and yes the numbers are a part of it, if they didn't count I wouldn't do them but I also wouldn't do them without friends or family or my camera or the memories I have from them. It's actually nice to rack up huge numbers and numerous memories as well.

It does sound like a unique experience - *maybe* something to try once - but it would geopardize my coveted status as a "low-numbers cacher." If I did it, i'd need to create a sock account and lead a double life! :ph34r:

 

Well, call me the Casanova of geocaching and it's all fun.

 

Just for the record Alamogul would be the Wilt Chamberlain.

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If you want to use the rule of find the cache and sign the log then 3 cache monte is not cheating as every cache is found by everyone in the group and signed.
Yeah, but some of us actually consider the whole "return the geocache to its original location" thing to be rather important... at least if you're going to call the activity "geocaching".

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Or, you know, because they're fun, with friends.

 

Sorry, I've never bought this argument.

 

It seems to me that if you're looking to have some fun geocaching with friends, if you spend the day finding 30 caches instead of 300 you're going to have a lot more time in between finds for socializing with friends.

Edited by NYPaddleCacher

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Or, you know, because they're fun, with friends.

 

Sorry, I've never bought this argument.

 

It seems to me that if you looking to have some fun geocaching with friends, if you spend the day finding 30 caches instead of 300 you're going to have a log more time in between finds for socializing with friends.

 

Well, I've done both on more that one occasion and the reason I've done either more than once was because I had fun with friends, doesn't make much sense to do it if you're not having fun.

Edited by Roman!

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If you want to use the rule of find the cache and sign the log then 3 cache monte is not cheating as every cache is found by everyone in the group and signed.
Yeah, but some of us actually consider the whole "return the geocache to its original location" thing to be rather important... at least if you're going to call the activity "geocaching".

 

Since there really are no rules there are practices that are accepted by the geocaching community such as getting someone to climb that tree for you and others that are frowned upon like leapfrogging. Three cache monte is a generally accepted way of doing some power trails. So while you may frown upon it I'll be frowning upon that person that didn't climb that tree.

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If you want to use the rule of find the cache and sign the log then 3 cache monte is not cheating as every cache is found by everyone in the group and signed.
Yeah, but some of us actually consider the whole "return the geocache to its original location" thing to be rather important... at least if you're going to call the activity "geocaching".

 

Since there really are no rules there are practices that are accepted by the geocaching community such as getting someone to climb that tree for you and others that are frowned upon like leapfrogging. Three cache monte is a generally accepted way of doing some power trails. So while you may frown upon it I'll be frowning upon that person that didn't climb that tree.

Hmmm...he does have a point there. And in power trails *only* it seems that the CO considers the caches interchangable. If there's a point of agreement it's that physical presence at the cache find is a must.

 

Which raises the question of these rare international multicaches i've heard about, "found" by teams made up of players at each site.

Edited by wmpastor

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If you want to use the rule of find the cache and sign the log then 3 cache monte is not cheating as every cache is found by everyone in the group and signed.
Yeah, but some of us actually consider the whole "return the geocache to its original location" thing to be rather important... at least if you're going to call the activity "geocaching".

 

Since there really are no rules there are practices that are accepted by the geocaching community such as getting someone to climb that tree for you and others that are frowned upon like leapfrogging. Three cache monte is a generally accepted way of doing some power trails. So while you may frown upon it I'll be frowning upon that person that didn't climb that tree.

Hmmm...he does have a point there. And in power trails *only* it seems that the CO considers the caches interchangable. If there's a point of agreement it's that physical presence at the cache find is a must.

 

Which raises the question of these rare international multicaches i've heard about, "found" by teams made up of players at each site.

 

We have one here in Vancouver where you have to work with people from three other countries to get the final coordinates for the cache in each country but then everyone just goes out and finds the cache in their country only.

 

Here's another question, let's assume you do not have any finds in Mexico yet, there is a multi just inside mexico by the San Diego border. Crossing that border can take hours but I have and anyone can get the info from Google. The final is in the US not far from the border. If you didn't have time to cross the border and you knew you'd never get another chance a a Mexico cache any time soon, would you go find the final without visiting the stage in Mexico?

Edited by Roman!

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Or, you know, because they're fun, with friends.

 

Sorry, I've never bought this argument.

 

It seems to me that if you're looking to have some fun geocaching with friends, if you spend the day finding 30 caches instead of 300 you're going to have a lot more time in between finds for socializing with friends.

 

My record was 52 with two siblings and a friend. Along a highway in Maine. Not a power trail. The hides were different. We left after breakfast, and go home for dinner. We had a lot of fun. But that's about as many as would be fun for me. I would not be having fun doing much more than that. Though my brother did find 103 one day. Better him than me.

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Or, you know, because they're fun, with friends.

 

Sorry, I've never bought this argument. ...

 

 

Can we really question whether a cacher is having fun when he says he's having fun? People have fun in different ways.

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Or, you know, because they're fun, with friends.

 

Sorry, I've never bought this argument. ...

 

 

Can we really question whether a cacher is having fun when he says he's having fun? People have fun in different ways.

 

Absolutely, just ask my wife, although we may be partaking in the same activity at the same time in the same place and although I may be having a great time she swears she isn't, go figure.

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Or, you know, because they're fun, with friends.

 

Sorry, I've never bought this argument. ...

 

 

Can we really question whether a cacher is having fun when he says he's having fun? People have fun in different ways.

 

Absolutely, just ask my wife, although we may be partaking in the same activity at the same time in the same place and although I may be having a great time she swears she isn't, go figure.

 

You must not be doing something right. :lol:

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Or, you know, because they're fun, with friends.

 

Sorry, I've never bought this argument. ...

 

 

Can we really question whether a cacher is having fun when he says he's having fun? People have fun in different ways.

 

Absolutely, just ask my wife, although we may be partaking in the same activity at the same time in the same place and although I may be having a great time she swears she isn't, go figure.

 

You must not be doing something right. :lol:

 

Since I am a man and my wife is a woman your statement is redundant.

Edited by Roman!

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