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jackman1955

Clothing to eliminate burrs

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Maybe a silly question, but many of the places I do caching, you can come out with your clothing covered with burrs. Any clothing or material that eliminates those pesky things?

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Maybe a silly question, but many of the places I do caching, you can come out with your clothing covered with burrs. Any clothing or material that eliminates those pesky things?

 

I bought some cargo pants that are 100% nylon and are great for not picking up burrs! as for socks and shoes! I don't know.

 

Maybe gaters?

Edited by Roman!

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Maybe a silly question, but many of the places I do caching, you can come out with your clothing covered with burrs. Any clothing or material that eliminates those pesky things?

Not what you wanted to hear (others are providing that info), but concrete and macadam eliminate those pesky things. :yikes:

 

I came across a new type of burr the other day. This looks straight and thin, like a spruce tree needle (1.5 cm long), but straw-colored. However, it's got a 3 or 4 prong barb at the end. I had to remove dozens. :angry:

 

I'll watch this thread for answers.

Edited by wmpastor

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Maybe a silly question, but many of the places I do caching, you can come out with your clothing covered with burrs. Any clothing or material that eliminates those pesky things?

 

I bought some cargo pants that are 100% nylon and are great for not picking up burrs! as for socks and shoes! I don't know.

 

Maybe gaters?

 

Thanks, I'll look around for some..................

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I came across a new type of burr the other day. This looks straight and thin, like a spruce tree needle (1.5 cm long), but straw-colored. However, it's got a 3 or 4 prong barb at the end. I had to remove dozens. :angry:

 

I'll watch this thread for answers.

Beggerticks maybe? Many varieties, from trangular to needle-like.

Beggerticks

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I came across a new type of burr the other day. This looks straight and thin, like a spruce tree needle (1.5 cm long), but straw-colored. However, it's got a 3 or 4 prong barb at the end. I had to remove dozens. :angry:

 

I'll watch this thread for answers.

Beggerticks maybe? Many varieties, from trangular to needle-like.

Beggerticks

 

Thanks - think that's it. Not triangular - thin.

 

Beggarticks this variety

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I get the concrete but what do macadamias have to do with anything :laughing:

 

Macadam is like concrete...............

 

I know, wmpastor was trying to be smart, I was trying to be funny, looks like we both struck out :anibad:

Edited by Roman!

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I get the concrete but what do macadamias have to do with anything :laughing:

 

Macadam is like concrete...............

 

I know, wmpastor was trying to be smart, I was trying to be funny, looks like we both struck out :anibad:

:laughing:

 

I was being so helpful - stick with urban micros and problems with burrs are ancient history! :grin:

Edited by wmpastor

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Maybe a silly question, but many of the places I do caching, you can come out with your clothing covered with burrs. Any clothing or material that eliminates those pesky things?

Not what you wanted to hear (others are providing that info), but concrete and macadam eliminate those pesky things. :yikes:

 

So would a plastic rain coat, but you might want to remove it before searching for any caches near playgrounds.

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As far as burrs on socks when geocaching in shorts, go to Walmart or any other big box store. Go to the women's clothing department and buy the largest box of knee-high nylons you can find. I personally prefer something called trouser socks, they are a little stronger. Pull on your regular cotton or wool socks (I prefer knee-high acrylic ski socks to protect my lower legs from stinging nettles, poison ivy, cuts and scrapes), pull the knee-high nylons over the top of your regular socks and head out. When searching for a geocache not in the woods I push the socks and nylons down around my ankles. At the end of the day, you can either brush the burrs off (they do not stick to nylons near as bad as cotton or wool socks) or just pull the knee-high nylons off outside in and throw them away. You can even pull the knee-high nylons over your shoes to protect your shoestrings. They will not last long walking on them but when purchased in bulk they cost as little as 50 cents a pair and I consider them consumables. I spend much more for gas on an afternoon of geocaching. By the way, I am male and this beats spending an hour pulling burrs out of my socks one at a time.    

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On 9/25/2014 at 9:42 PM, Roman! said:

I get the concrete but what do macadamias have to do with anything :laughing:

 

Yeah, that's nuts.

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On 8/20/2020 at 3:33 PM, solidude said:

As far as burrs on socks when geocaching in shorts, go to Walmart or any other big box store. Go to the women's clothing department and buy the largest box of knee-high nylons you can find. I personally prefer something called trouser socks, they are a little stronger. Pull on your regular cotton or wool socks (I prefer knee-high acrylic ski socks to protect my lower legs from stinging nettles, poison ivy, cuts and scrapes), pull the knee-high nylons over the top of your regular socks and head out. When searching for a geocache not in the woods I push the socks and nylons down around my ankles. At the end of the day, you can either brush the burrs off (they do not stick to nylons near as bad as cotton or wool socks) or just pull the knee-high nylons off outside in and throw them away. You can even pull the knee-high nylons over your shoes to protect your shoestrings. They will not last long walking on them but when purchased in bulk they cost as little as 50 cents a pair and I consider them consumables. I spend much more for gas on an afternoon of geocaching. By the way, I am male and this beats spending an hour pulling burrs out of my socks one at a time.    

Google Soxsavers. https://www.workwearhub.com.au/dnc-cotton-boot-covers-6001-khaki.html

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On 8/20/2020 at 12:33 AM, solidude said:

protect my lower legs from stinging nettles,

Except for the geocaching forums I had never heard of stinging nettles before. I have however been attacked by a jumping cactus. It took a family member half an hour to get all the hooks out of my back.

So anyways I was watching a movie tonight and they mentioned stinging nettle soup. 

Whaaaaat? 

Learned something new again. I only heard bad things about stinging nettles but none of you told me you can actually make a soup with them! 😀

And pesto and other delicious recipes. 

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2 hours ago, Max and 99 said:

Except for the geocaching forums I had never heard of stinging nettles before. I have however been attacked by a jumping cactus. It took a family member half an hour to get all the hooks out of my back.

So anyways I was watching a movie tonight and they mentioned stinging nettle soup. 

Whaaaaat? 

Learned something new again. I only heard bad things about stinging nettles but none of you told me you can actually make a soup with them! 😀

And pesto and other delicious recipes. 

I am surprised you don't have stinging nettle. It's not native to Australia, but it has made its way here, but it's not as common in most places, as in the UK. It was a well remembered part of my caching experience in the UK.

We have stinging trees in the tropical and sub-tropical areas, and even bordering temperate regions. I used to live in a temperate area (because of altitude), with the lower regions being sub-tropical, and the local rainforest had stinging trees. I knew what to look for and avoid, and a reason why I wore shoes in the forest, because of the fear of walking on fallen leaves. I have heard of people being so badly stung they have gone into shock and died.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendrocnide_moroides

 

Added: This is the variety of stinging tree where I used to live:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendrocnide_excelsa

Edited by Goldenwattle

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1 hour ago, Goldenwattle said:

I am surprised you don't have stinging nettle.

I said I had never heard of it before, but it is found in North America!  (I looked it up). But I'm not going to try and find it or make a soup out of it. 😀 

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6 hours ago, Max and 99 said:

I said I had never heard of it before, but it is found in North America!  (I looked it up). But I'm not going to try and find it or make a soup out of it. 😀 

 

While camping in Alaska a long time ago, my mother requested that my brothers and I go pick nettles and fern shoots for lunch. We got a bunch, and I was pretty sure I was gonna die from eating stinging nettles. But she boiled the leaves with fern shoots and fresh green beans she brought, and added butter. Fresh, tender nettle leaves are fine after being boiled. We didn't use the woody stalks that have thorns, just the leaves.

 

I've recently found places locally where there are patches of nettles. I was surprised to be stung while retrieving a cache, not realizing what the plants were. But they only affect direct skin contact, not if you brush against them with your clothes. The “sting” doesn't remain on clothes like poison ivy oils. But some nettle stalks have long sturdy thorns, so it there could be issues with thorns penetrating clothes, depending on clothing thickness.

 

 

Edited by kunarion
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15 hours ago, Goldenwattle said:

I am surprised you don't have stinging nettle. It's not native to Australia, but it has made its way here, but it's not as common in most places, as in the UK. It was a well remembered part of my caching experience in the UK.

We have stinging trees in the tropical and sub-tropical areas, and even bordering temperate regions. I used to live in a temperate area (because of altitude), with the lower regions being sub-tropical, and the local rainforest had stinging trees. I knew what to look for and avoid, and a reason why I wore shoes in the forest, because of the fear of walking on fallen leaves. I have heard of people being so badly stung they have gone into shock and died.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendrocnide_moroides

 

Added: This is the variety of stinging tree where I used to live:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendrocnide_excelsa

Should we talk about Waitawhile? 

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3 hours ago, Bundyrumandcoke said:

Should we talk about Waitawhile? 

Wait a while, I'll have to get back to you on that. I'm a bit caught up at present :laughing:.

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12 hours ago, kunarion said:

 

While camping in Alaska a long time ago, my mother requested that my brothers and I go pick nettles and fern shoots for lunch. We got a bunch, and I was pretty sure I was gonna die from eating stinging nettles. But she boiled the leaves with fern shoots and fresh green beans she brought, and added butter. Fresh, tender nettle leaves are fine after being boiled. We didn't use the woody stalks that have thorns, just the leaves.

 

I've recently found places locally where there are patches of nettles. I was surprised to be stung while retrieving a cache, not realizing what the plants were. But they only affect direct skin contact, not if you brush against them with your clothes. The “sting” doesn't remain on clothes like poison ivy oils. But some nettle stalks have long sturdy thorns, so it there could be issues with thorns penetrating clothes, depending on clothing thickness.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Goldenwattle said:

Wait a while, I'll have to get back to you on that. I'm a bit caught up at present :laughing:.

Well, I wouldnt want to get my hooks into you. 

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On 9/12/2020 at 12:28 AM, Max and 99 said:

I said I had never heard of it before, but it is found in North America!  (I looked it up). But I'm not going to try and find it or make a soup out of it. 😀 

 

This discussion reminded me of Rockville Stinger, a cache hidden in a local hiking park, popular for earthcaches and other hides.  I've hiked it a few times, lots of "hazards" like poison oak, rattlesnakes, other critters and yes, stinging nettles!

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On 9/25/2014 at 8:32 PM, jackman1955 said:

Maybe a silly question, but many of the places I do caching, you can come out with your clothing covered with burrs. Any clothing or material that eliminates those pesky things?

 

A great question as I had some on my capris recently. As someone suggested, nylon is probably the best material. But in my humble opinion...it's another "battle wound" of geocaching! lol 

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If people are really serious about not getting burrs, then the best clothing is a full body latex suit. The smooth surface ensures there is nothing for the burrs to get hold of and it's usually thick enough that most thorns brushing up against the wearer won't tear a hole. Mind you, trying this outfit in 98F heat with 90% humidity may result in ... other issues. :D

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