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Temporary caches (Not a Mega Event)


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We run a small geocaching event every year at a local conservation area. The area is about 62 acres and is already populated with as many caches as will fit. Each year we look for ways to attract geocachers who have already attended the event or have found the caches already placed there.

 

Know of any plans to allow smaller events to place temporary caches?

 

Any ideas on attracting repeat geocachers back to an event every year?

 

Thanks

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Archive some of the older caches so new caches can be placed.

 

I'd go with that idea.

 

Does anyone know if new caches are a must at events. Do they really attract cachers? Without new caches are the number of attenders generally quite low?

 

Would advertised workshops and displays attract geocachers?

 

Example: Workshops: How to carve a stamp for a letterbox; Puzzle caches - how to solve them (without giving away specific caches); GSAK - how to create a macro; Caches along a route - how to; How to build a birdhouse cache; How to handle a trackable; When, why, how to ask for permission. Displays: cache sizes (with emphasis that a button nano falls under the micro category); water tight container examples; geocoins & trackables; signature items (maybe get folks to pin their signature item on a board); etc.

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I don't know if you want to go there, and I'll bet it's the reason Great Scott's post was "edited by moderator", but you can place all the temporary caches you want for the day of the event. And Groundspeak doesn't even care if people log that they attended the event 125 times if they found 125 temporary caches. HOWEVER, this practice has died out to the point where it's pretty much unheard of outside of parts of Ohio, Pa., and West Virginia. The key word there being PARTS of those States, I might add. :lol:

 

I have been an event a couple times that's going to be up to it's 11th or 12th annual gathering this summer (but not big enough for Mega status), and they always have temporary caches "just for the fun of it". And ultimately, world wide, most events that have temporary caches are "just for the fun of it.

 

A Poker run is a good use of temporary caches, where people can have fun, and earn prizes.

Edited by Mr.Yuck
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Archive some of the older caches so new caches can be placed.

 

I'd go with that idea.

 

Does anyone know if new caches are a must at events. Do they really attract cachers? Without new caches are the number of attenders generally quite low?

 

Would advertised workshops and displays attract geocachers?

 

Example: Workshops: How to carve a stamp for a letterbox; Puzzle caches - how to solve them (without giving away specific caches); GSAK - how to create a macro; Caches along a route - how to; How to build a birdhouse cache; How to handle a trackable; When, why, how to ask for permission. Displays: cache sizes (with emphasis that a button nano falls under the micro category); water tight container examples; geocoins & trackables; signature items (maybe get folks to pin their signature item on a board); etc.

 

Thanks

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I don't know if you want to go there, and I'll bet it's the reason Great Scott's post was "edited by moderator", but you can place all the temporary caches you want for the day of the event. And Groundspeak doesn't even care if people log that they attended the event 125 times if they found 125 temporary caches. HOWEVER, this practice has died out to the point where it's pretty much unheard of outside of parts of Ohio, Pa., and West Virginia. The key word there being PARTS of those States, I might add. :lol:

 

I have been an event a couple times that's going to be up to it's 11th or 12th annual gathering this summer (but not big enough for Mega status), and they always have temporary caches "just for the fun of it". And ultimately, world wide, most events that have temporary caches are "just for the fun of it.

 

A Poker run is a good use of temporary caches, where people can have fun, and earn prizes.

 

I was hoping that LAB caches would have been the answer. It would be nice to have the ability to place temporary caches (just for the event) and be able to change them up each year. It would also allow attendees to log them as finds on geocaching.com. I do like the idea of the poker run. Thanks

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We run a small geocaching event every year at a local conservation area. The area is about 62 acres and is already populated with as many caches as will fit. Each year we look for ways to attract geocachers who have already attended the event or have found the caches already placed there.

 

Know of any plans to allow smaller events to place temporary caches?

 

Any ideas on attracting repeat geocachers back to an event every year?

 

Thanks

 

Make it good. Our annual event has a few things going for it. Lots of new caches 80-100. Lots of events. Welcome event, midnight meal, flashmob, BBQ/Voting/get together, and a CITO. Last year we had an "amazing race" where you had to go to certain places to get info to find the final. These places are historical, tourist friendly, interesting places. We had prizes for all who completed it. We have our BBQ at a public park, with playground equipment, and a waterpark, for the kids. Some simple games like closest to the pin. All over three days.

 

So what is all of that? Well it's fun if you're alone, caching with a friend, taking new cachers out, in a group of 15 people, or with your wife and kids. Everybody has fun. It's spread out-if you miss one thing, you only miss one thing, not everything. It has things to do. Aside from the actual events, and between them, you can go geocaching. With 80-100 new caches and almost 1000 existing ones, there's enough for everyone to find caches year after year. But you can go shopping, visit a museum, the farmers market, the drag races, or even visit some family if you have any in town. You don't have to cache for three straight days, and the events are spread out to allow you to do your own thing. You can make every event, get some caches, and still have time to do other stuff if you so feel like.

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Archiving old caches may make it worthy for some cachers to come to the event and rack up the numbers again, but for some, like me, if its the same areas and caches are just archived and then brought back for the sake of events, it usually just turns me off from coming to the whole area again. The odd cache gets archived but if they all just spring back up just for the sake of springing back up, I will pass.

 

Either way, that is not what you are talking about most likely, I was just responding to some folks who suggested this as an idea. It is an idea.

 

Hopefully lab caches will count in the statistics some day.

Edited by lamoracke
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For my annual summer event, I used to hide a couple or three new caches in the park where I held it. I stopped doing that a couple of years ago.

 

Roughly the same number of people kept showing up.

 

I moved it from its usual location last year (and will now keep moving it) and the same number of people showed up. Moving it keeps things fresh, and may get people out caching in areas that they usually do not cache in.

 

A few years back I moved it to be in the mid afternoon, and serve as a meet-up after a day of caching.

 

I haven't really done anything out of the ordinary to attract cachers. People just want to come out and hang out with fellow cachers, and maybe make some new friends.

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See Guideline 6.6.4. I think some Reviewers might steer one away from the idea that people are coming to an event to find more caches.

 

I think that, for the most part, people use the temporary caches at events as a game, not as a way to log more finds than just an "Attended" smilie. It's those cachers who want to boost a find count (yes, yes, or to harmlessly and simply keep track of what they've found in this lovely game of geocaching) that log multiple "Attended" logs to track the temporary caches they found as well.

 

The use of "scavenger hunts" or the like with temporary caches has certainly proven to be a popular game at extended-length outdoor events. One will have seen this done enough times that one might think it is a necessary inclusion at an Event. The attendees likely have grown accustomed to seeing this game played at events. Most have likely found joy in creating and participating. But, things get muddled when one expects that it would be a part of an event, and would/would not attend based soley on that game being part of the event.

 

Let people find the caches in the area if they like. Many will have already been planning to do so before, during, or after. Feel free to place or not place temporary caches for the event. But you shouldn't feel like you have to do it, or that you have to provide more "fun" than just a gathering of geocachers in one place.

 

The idea that people expect there to be Lab Caches at Megas, Temporary caches at events, or a way to log more than just the one "Attended" log for any event is troublesome to me. And, therein is why I think the guideline exists. As far as guidelines go, this one has been bent quite a bit...and with enough continued bending may break off. Some will utter a polite, "Meh...", but I don't like to think that any event I would have to create in the future would have to also place temporary or permanent caches to lure in attendees. The events should be able to stand on their own, and create a way for geocachers to get together and have fun whether there are Lab, standard, or temporary caches or not.

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See Guideline 6.6.4. I think some Reviewers might steer one away from the idea that people are coming to an event to find more caches.

 

I think that, for the most part, people use the temporary caches at events as a game, not as a way to log more finds than just an "Attended" smilie. It's those cachers who want to boost a find count (yes, yes, or to harmlessly and simply keep track of what they've found in this lovely game of geocaching) that log multiple "Attended" logs to track the temporary caches they found as well.

 

The use of "scavenger hunts" or the like with temporary caches has certainly proven to be a popular game at extended-length outdoor events. One will have seen this done enough times that one might think it is a necessary inclusion at an Event. The attendees likely have grown accustomed to seeing this game played at events. Most have likely found joy in creating and participating. But, things get muddled when one expects that it would be a part of an event, and would/would not attend based soley on that game being part of the event.

 

Let people find the caches in the area if they like. Many will have already been planning to do so before, during, or after. Feel free to place or not place temporary caches for the event. But you shouldn't feel like you have to do it, or that you have to provide more "fun" than just a gathering of geocachers in one place.

 

The idea that people expect there to be Lab Caches at Megas, Temporary caches at events, or a way to log more than just the one "Attended" log for any event is troublesome to me. And, therein is why I think the guideline exists. As far as guidelines go, this one has been bent quite a bit...and with enough continued bending may break off. Some will utter a polite, "Meh...", but I don't like to think that any event I would have to create in the future would have to also place temporary or permanent caches to lure in attendees. The events should be able to stand on their own, and create a way for geocachers to get together and have fun whether there are Lab, standard, or temporary caches or not.

 

Thanks for the feedback. I'm not concerned with cachers padding there stats. I'm more interested in giving the ones who have already attended previous events (and found the caches that are preeminently placed) something new and fresh to do. We are working on a letterboxing program for the property. We could incorporate the letterbox hides into a scavenger hunt and use coords instead of written clues to find the hides. Keep the ideas flowing. Thanks.

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Archiving old caches may make it worthy for some cachers to come to the event and rack up the numbers again, but for some, like me, if its the same areas and caches are just archived and then brought back for the sake of events, it usually just turns me off from coming to the whole area again. The odd cache gets archived but if they all just spring back up just for the sake of springing back up, I will pass.

 

Either way, that is not what you are talking about most likely, I was just responding to some folks who suggested this as an idea. It is an idea.

 

Hopefully lab caches will count in the statistics some day.

 

Didn't consider that. Yes, archiving and then just re-publishing the same old cache in the same old location would be very disappointing.

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See Guideline 6.6.4. I think some Reviewers might steer one away from the idea that people are coming to an event to find more caches.

 

I think that, for the most part, people use the temporary caches at events as a game, not as a way to log more finds than just an "Attended" smilie. It's those cachers who want to boost a find count (yes, yes, or to harmlessly and simply keep track of what they've found in this lovely game of geocaching) that log multiple "Attended" logs to track the temporary caches they found as well.

 

The use of "scavenger hunts" or the like with temporary caches has certainly proven to be a popular game at extended-length outdoor events. One will have seen this done enough times that one might think it is a necessary inclusion at an Event. The attendees likely have grown accustomed to seeing this game played at events. Most have likely found joy in creating and participating. But, things get muddled when one expects that it would be a part of an event, and would/would not attend based soley on that game being part of the event.

 

Let people find the caches in the area if they like. Many will have already been planning to do so before, during, or after. Feel free to place or not place temporary caches for the event. But you shouldn't feel like you have to do it, or that you have to provide more "fun" than just a gathering of geocachers in one place.

 

The idea that people expect there to be Lab Caches at Megas, Temporary caches at events, or a way to log more than just the one "Attended" log for any event is troublesome to me. And, therein is why I think the guideline exists. As far as guidelines go, this one has been bent quite a bit...and with enough continued bending may break off. Some will utter a polite, "Meh...", but I don't like to think that any event I would have to create in the future would have to also place temporary or permanent caches to lure in attendees. The events should be able to stand on their own, and create a way for geocachers to get together and have fun whether there are Lab, standard, or temporary caches or not.

 

Thanks for the feedback. I'm not concerned with cachers padding there stats. I'm more interested in giving the ones who have already attended previous events (and found the caches that are preeminently placed) something new and fresh to do. We are working on a letterboxing program for the property. We could incorporate the letterbox hides into a scavenger hunt and use coords instead of written clues to find the hides. Keep the ideas flowing. Thanks.

Right on. I just wanted to share the related guideline, and my thoughts on the ethics of it.

 

A letterbox set would be new and different--not all cachers know what a letterbox is, and you'll provide a good way to teach them about it. (Nice thought, that!)

 

You may not be worried about "padding stats", but some cachers are. That's the part where I don't want to see a future where events must have lab or "new" caches to be found for people to want to come.

 

There are many other fun event iteas that make for a good time:

-A "Micro Toss", where people stand outside a designated area and try to toss a film can to a bullseye. Closest wins.

-An "Accuracy Challenge", where you give surveyor flags to people, and have them place their flags where their GPS tells them "ground zero" is. You record a spot before this all happens, and the closest person to your spot wins.

-Cache container contest, where awards are given for categories of cache containers. Best Camo, Best Creative Design, and a kid's category, of course!

-Use of temporary caches to complete a worksheet/scavenger hunt. First done, or other criteria apply

-Coordinate Hangman: Have a blank sheet with N/W coordinate blanks for your area. (N_ _ _ degrees _ _._ _ W _ _ degrees _ _._ _ _) Start entering numbers at a set time. Add a number one at a time at set intervals (Every half hour, or whatever makes sense) throughtout the event. First person to find the cache at those coordinates wins.

 

Enjoy. These are just a few of the games I found to be successful, and a lot of fun.

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See Guideline 6.6.4. I think some Reviewers might steer one away from the idea that people are coming to an event to find more caches.

 

I think that, for the most part, people use the temporary caches at events as a game, not as a way to log more finds than just an "Attended" smilie. It's those cachers who want to boost a find count (yes, yes, or to harmlessly and simply keep track of what they've found in this lovely game of geocaching) that log multiple "Attended" logs to track the temporary caches they found as well.

 

The use of "scavenger hunts" or the like with temporary caches has certainly proven to be a popular game at extended-length outdoor events. One will have seen this done enough times that one might think it is a necessary inclusion at an Event. The attendees likely have grown accustomed to seeing this game played at events. Most have likely found joy in creating and participating. But, things get muddled when one expects that it would be a part of an event, and would/would not attend based soley on that game being part of the event.

 

Let people find the caches in the area if they like. Many will have already been planning to do so before, during, or after. Feel free to place or not place temporary caches for the event. But you shouldn't feel like you have to do it, or that you have to provide more "fun" than just a gathering of geocachers in one place.

 

The idea that people expect there to be Lab Caches at Megas, Temporary caches at events, or a way to log more than just the one "Attended" log for any event is troublesome to me. And, therein is why I think the guideline exists. As far as guidelines go, this one has been bent quite a bit...and with enough continued bending may break off. Some will utter a polite, "Meh...", but I don't like to think that any event I would have to create in the future would have to also place temporary or permanent caches to lure in attendees. The events should be able to stand on their own, and create a way for geocachers to get together and have fun whether there are Lab, standard, or temporary caches or not.

 

Thanks for the feedback. I'm not concerned with cachers padding there stats. I'm more interested in giving the ones who have already attended previous events (and found the caches that are preeminently placed) something new and fresh to do. We are working on a letterboxing program for the property. We could incorporate the letterbox hides into a scavenger hunt and use coords instead of written clues to find the hides. Keep the ideas flowing. Thanks.

Right on. I just wanted to share the related guideline, and my thoughts on the ethics of it.

 

A letterbox set would be new and different--not all cachers know what a letterbox is, and you'll provide a good way to teach them about it. (Nice thought, that!)

 

You may not be worried about "padding stats", but some cachers are. That's the part where I don't want to see a future where events must have lab or "new" caches to be found for people to want to come.

 

There are many other fun event iteas that make for a good time:

-A "Micro Toss", where people stand outside a designated area and try to toss a film can to a bullseye. Closest wins.

-An "Accuracy Challenge", where you give surveyor flags to people, and have them place their flags where their GPS tells them "ground zero" is. You record a spot before this all happens, and the closest person to your spot wins.

-Cache container contest, where awards are given for categories of cache containers. Best Camo, Best Creative Design, and a kid's category, of course!

-Use of temporary caches to complete a worksheet/scavenger hunt. First done, or other criteria apply

-Coordinate Hangman: Have a blank sheet with N/W coordinate blanks for your area. (N_ _ _ degrees _ _._ _ W _ _ degrees _ _._ _ _) Start entering numbers at a set time. Add a number one at a time at set intervals (Every half hour, or whatever makes sense) throughtout the event. First person to find the cache at those coordinates wins.

 

Enjoy. These are just a few of the games I found to be successful, and a lot of fun.

 

SWEET!!! Thanks for taking the time to share these ideas.

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Does anyone know if new caches are a must at events.
Most of the events I've attended haven't had any new caches.

 

One exception was an event where attendees were given the letterbox-style clues for an unpublished LBH. More than half the group tromped off to follow the parade to the container location. The rest of us stayed put and kept socializing.

 

Another exception was a themed event, where someone other than the event organizer placed a similarly themed cache near the event venue. But by the time the event started, FTF was long gone, and the cache had been found dozens of times. I found the cache after the event.

 

Would advertised workshops and displays attract geocachers?
For certain cachers, yes. The Little Shop of Horrors events around here have been very well attended, but there's a "come see what everyone else is working on" aspect to those events, in addition to a "come use the workshop" aspect. Other workshop/class type events (e.g., polymer clay workshops, puzzle workshops) have been fairly well attended, filling up the available spaces in advance, and in some cases, prompting the organizer to schedule another event for the people who were on the waitlist for the first workshop/class.
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I'm not crazy about events where there are a bunch of caches nearby. I've spent entire days at events where I didn't see a significant portion of the attendees because they came, signed the logbook and went caching. It's sad that the event itself and the opportunity to meet and socialize with other geocachers isn't enough these days. People have to be coaxed to attend by the promise of a bunch of smileys.

 

I really don't see what new caches in the area actually accomplish, because the only thing a a lot of the attendees contribute to the event is a signature in the logbook. I'd rather only 20 people showed up at one of my events and everyone spent the time chatting and getting to know each other than have 120 attendees, where 100 of them were MIA all day.

 

Now that my rant is over, to answer the OP, the common practice around here is to churn the caches by archiving the old ones (even if only a year old) and submitting new ones.

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See Guideline 6.6.4. I think some Reviewers might steer one away from the idea that people are coming to an event to find more caches.

 

I think that, for the most part, people use the temporary caches at events as a game, not as a way to log more finds than just an "Attended" smilie. It's those cachers who want to boost a find count (yes, yes, or to harmlessly and simply keep track of what they've found in this lovely game of geocaching) that log multiple "Attended" logs to track the temporary caches they found as well.

 

The use of "scavenger hunts" or the like with temporary caches has certainly proven to be a popular game at extended-length outdoor events. One will have seen this done enough times that one might think it is a necessary inclusion at an Event. The attendees likely have grown accustomed to seeing this game played at events. Most have likely found joy in creating and participating. But, things get muddled when one expects that it would be a part of an event, and would/would not attend based soley on that game being part of the event.

 

Let people find the caches in the area if they like. Many will have already been planning to do so before, during, or after. Feel free to place or not place temporary caches for the event. But you shouldn't feel like you have to do it, or that you have to provide more "fun" than just a gathering of geocachers in one place.

 

The idea that people expect there to be Lab Caches at Megas, Temporary caches at events, or a way to log more than just the one "Attended" log for any event is troublesome to me. And, therein is why I think the guideline exists. As far as guidelines go, this one has been bent quite a bit...and with enough continued bending may break off. Some will utter a polite, "Meh...", but I don't like to think that any event I would have to create in the future would have to also place temporary or permanent caches to lure in attendees. The events should be able to stand on their own, and create a way for geocachers to get together and have fun whether there are Lab, standard, or temporary caches or not.

+1

have agree totally

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There are many other fun event iteas that make for a good time:

-A "Micro Toss", where people stand outside a designated area and try to toss a film can to a bullseye. Closest wins.

-An "Accuracy Challenge", where you give surveyor flags to people, and have them place their flags where their GPS tells them "ground zero" is. You record a spot before this all happens, and the closest person to your spot wins.

-Cache container contest, where awards are given for categories of cache containers. Best Camo, Best Creative Design, and a kid's category, of course!

-Use of temporary caches to complete a worksheet/scavenger hunt. First done, or other criteria apply

-Coordinate Hangman: Have a blank sheet with N/W coordinate blanks for your area. (N_ _ _ degrees _ _._ _ W _ _ degrees _ _._ _ _) Start entering numbers at a set time. Add a number one at a time at set intervals (Every half hour, or whatever makes sense) throughtout the event. First person to find the cache at those coordinates wins.

 

Enjoy. These are just a few of the games I found to be successful, and a lot of fun.

Thanks. I've added some of these to the Cacheopedia article:

http://www.cacheopedia.com/wiki/Event_cache#Games_and_Activities_for_Events

 

There are other ideas for event games/activities there as well.

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The events should be able to stand on their own, and create a way for geocachers to get together and have fun whether there are Lab, standard, or temporary caches or not.

 

This! If the only reason people are coming to my event is so they can rack up a bunch of numbers, I really don't need them there.

Link to comment
There are many other fun event iteas that make for a good time:

-A "Micro Toss", where people stand outside a designated area and try to toss a film can to a bullseye. Closest wins.

-An "Accuracy Challenge", where you give surveyor flags to people, and have them place their flags where their GPS tells them "ground zero" is. You record a spot before this all happens, and the closest person to your spot wins.

-Cache container contest, where awards are given for categories of cache containers. Best Camo, Best Creative Design, and a kid's category, of course!

-Use of temporary caches to complete a worksheet/scavenger hunt. First done, or other criteria apply

-Coordinate Hangman: Have a blank sheet with N/W coordinate blanks for your area. (N_ _ _ degrees _ _._ _ W _ _ degrees _ _._ _ _) Start entering numbers at a set time. Add a number one at a time at set intervals (Every half hour, or whatever makes sense) throughtout the event. First person to find the cache at those coordinates wins.

 

Enjoy. These are just a few of the games I found to be successful, and a lot of fun.

Thanks. I've added some of these to the Cacheopedia article:

http://www.cacheopedia.com/wiki/Event_cache#Games_and_Activities_for_Events

 

There are other ideas for event games/activities there as well.

 

You did?!?!?!!?!?!?!? Were you aware of the fact that Cacheopedia was offline for about 2 months, including the last time I looked about 5 days ago? I sent the guy an email, and he never answered, but I'd like to now think I'm responsible for it's reappearance. :ph34r:

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Were you aware of the fact that Cacheopedia was offline for about 2 months, including the last time I looked about 5 days ago? I sent the guy an email, and he never answered, but I'd like to now think I'm responsible for it's reappearance. :ph34r:
Yeah, I've been in touch with Rich over that. I don't have the details, but he's been having issues with the hosting service. But it's back again.
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The events should be able to stand on their own, and create a way for geocachers to get together and have fun whether there are Lab, standard, or temporary caches or not.

 

This! If the only reason people are coming to my event is so they can rack up a bunch of numbers, I really don't need them there.

Exactly. I host events, and attend events, so I can schmooze with old friends and new ones, chatting about this quirky hobby, and occasionally playing games such as those listed by Never Summer. Not to boost my smilie count. If you do opt to archive/replace all the caches in some bid to attract the numbers crowd, please, for the love of Giai, put the new ones somewhere other than where the old ones were.

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Were you aware of the fact that Cacheopedia was offline for about 2 months, including the last time I looked about 5 days ago? I sent the guy an email, and he never answered, but I'd like to now think I'm responsible for it's reappearance. :ph34r:
Yeah, I've been in touch with Rich over that. I don't have the details, but he's been having issues with the hosting service. But it's back again.

 

Don't know him, just pulled his email address out of the ol' WHOIS lookup. So even though I emailed him like 5 days ago, it's probably just a coincedence that he got it back up. :) Poor Cacheopedia gets blown away in Google searches by this free Geocaching wikia thing anyways. I have no idea why someone felt the need to start that 5 years after Cacheopedia, but whatever. Perhaps we could get the Frog to go after them for copyright infringement? :laughing:

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The events should be able to stand on their own, and create a way for geocachers to get together and have fun whether there are Lab, standard, or temporary caches or not.

 

This! If the only reason people are coming to my event is so they can rack up a bunch of numbers, I really don't need them there.

 

+1

 

I was always under the impression that Geocaching events were supposed to be "About Geocaching", not "for geocaching".

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