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Are we Geocaching snobs ?


rojanich
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My husband and I have been caching now for just over two years. We’re both retired and not very fit so we don’t tend to go for high Terrain starred caches but we do enjoy being lead to places of scenic, historic or architectural etc. interest. We’ve decided we’re not into trying to reach high numbers of caches just for the sake of it although we do watch our number of finds with interest and not a little pride ! We also enjoy the fun of sending our own trackables on their way or helping other people’s little travellers on theirs.

 

Here’s the thing though. We’ve been very lucky to be able to cache in the UK, France, Spain and the USA and while we’ve been to some great places and found, and sometime not found, some great caches we’re getting fed up with being sent to places with absolutely nothing to recommend them to be visited except the fact that there is a cache there; usually a micro or a nano so not even a chance for trading or trackable exchange.

 

Sometimes we can suss this out before hand by using Google Maps but a few times we’ve been to places where to ‘Trash Out’ we’d have needed a mega-skip or a bulldozer and there's not even a view to cheer us up.

 

Our least favourite so far was the lamp post (aka dog pee tree :o ) on a walkway through an industrial estate.

 

So, this isn’t a question with a right/wrong answer I guess but are we becoming Geocaching snobs and can anyone else relate to our feelings ? B)

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Honestly? Yeah...kinda.

 

It's not necessarily a bad thing. It's a personal preference. Me, I try to find value in how caching encourages me to explore this city I call home...the good and the ugly. But I know many people don't look at it the same as me. Best you can do is research ahead of time and ignore the ones that don't appear to have much scenery to recommend them.

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A friend of mine used to say (in another context) that "despite what they say about beggars, if you are not choosy you end up with a bunch of ____." I have found the same to be true in this game. At one point, I came across a nano hidden on a landscaping trellis in a busy shopping center in front of the windows of at least two businesses and realized that I did not need to look for it. I have followed that practice since then.

 

So of course I am a snob. I tend not to do most of the caches" that are placed in my area. No matter where I am I will pay close attention to virtuals, earthcaches, letterbox hybrids, or wherigos. But in planning for an upcoming trip, only one traditional has caught my eye.

 

At one point, I thought that most people placed caches to take you to interesting places. That was a long time ago. I have enjoyed many different areas that I would not have discovered but for this game, and still find that caching can help lead me to these spots. But if the area does not immediately stand out, and I am not there for other reasons, there has to be something to convince me to go there. The title. The description. A nearby roadside america listing. History. A photo op. A good trail. As I have told my wife, I can always get a smiley. I have enough of them. So I guess that indeed makes me a snob.

Edited by geodarts
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Are you Geocaching snobs? Maybe so, but that's not a bad thing. I'd say continue trying to do the type of caches you like and ignore the ones you don't like.

 

When we travel, I try to pick caches that are larger than micro, are at a location with a great view or historical interest, or (best of all) all of the above.

 

In my home town, I try to find just about everything, because there aren't that many here.

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Around my area, I've learned not to get too excited about anything with "March Of The Prnguins" (stuck to an ice vending machine) or "Drug Wars" (pharmacy parking lot) in the title. I might grab it if I happen to be passing right by it but I won't go much out of my way for it or spend a lot of time searching. Likewise obvious guardrail caches....really, you thought there was something very special about this particular highway guardrail that everyone simply must see? 😳

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I'm happy to get some numbers while I stay local, but if I'm on a trip, I plan my caching pretty carefully. What I do to get a good experience is try to find one or two highly recommended caches -- lots of favorites, lots of good photos in the logs -- and plot a hike around those. If there are some micros or less awesome caches on the way, that's okay and I'll certainly grab those, too.

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You are not becoming snobs by being selective, or only doing certain types of caches, or liking some kinds of caches better than others. That is entirely your prerogative. You are being a snob when you look down upon those who do not share your point of view or otherwise show them disdain. It's one thing to not find certain kinds of caches (or find them and sadly shake your head to yourself), it's another to find them and then write mean spirited posts about it or otherwise try to make the people that like said caches feel worthless.

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Are you Geocaching snobs? Maybe so, but that's not a bad thing. I'd say continue trying to do the type of caches you like and ignore the ones you don't like.

 

When we travel, I try to pick caches that are larger than micro, are at a location with a great view or historical interest, or (best of all) all of the above.

 

 

Ditto. I am not a numbers hounds locally and even less so when I travel (20 different countries so far). I usually hand pick a few caches that I want to find, usually located in ares that I'd want to visit even if there wasn't a cache there.

 

 

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Yep. Coming here to start a thread about your preferences just to look down your nose at others and find others of a like mind definitely makes you a snob. Just going out and caching, enjoying your way and letting others enjoy theirs, then coming to start threads about adventures or cool containers, etc.--if you did that, you wouldn't be a snob. But starting this thread--yeah, you're a snob.

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... we do enjoy being lead to places of scenic, historic or architectural etc. interest.

 

 

At one time, you could use geocaching to find the nice places in town. These days, it's turned around. You have to find the nice places first, then check to see if there are any geocaches around.

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... we do enjoy being lead to places of scenic, historic or architectural etc. interest.

 

 

At one time, you could use geocaching to find the nice places in town. These days, it's turned around. You have to find the nice places first, then check to see if there are any geocaches around.

Agreed.

We've hiked and gone sightseeing well before we knew of caching.

We were facinated by the idea that others were sharing cool spots for us to investigate through geocaching.

For a while now that hasn't been the case, but my other 2/3rds still kept with it for some time.

We now hike and sightsee, sometimes revisiting areas we enjoyed, but not neccessarily to cache.

- If a cache happens to be there too, great.

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I don't think the word "snob" fits, as that would imply that you feel you are better than others. The correct words would probably be "selective", "careful", "choosy", and "normal".

I'm not sure. They try to be "selective", "careful", and "choosy" when sussing out caches to search for, yet they still find they are "being sent" to places with "absolutely nothing to recommend them to be visited except the fact that there is a cache there."

 

Either they are not being choosy enough or there is a real problem in determining which caches to search for and which to skip. I would think if you are not into numbers and have time to decide where to cache you could spend a bit more time picking out caches you are more likely to enjoy. We now have the favorite points to help find caches that stand out as more memorable or rewarding. And you can look at the logs and cache description to see if the cache has any purpose beside being just another cache to find. And if the GPS still leads you to a place where you would rather not be searching for a cache, you always have the choice to not search and simply move on to the next cache.

 

When I see a soft-serve ice cream machine, I order a different dessert :mmraspberry:

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I don't think the word "snob" fits, as that would imply that you feel you are better than others. The correct words would probably be "selective", "careful", "choosy", and "normal".

I'm not sure. They try to be "selective", "careful", and "choosy" when sussing out caches to search for, yet they still find they are "being sent" to places with "absolutely nothing to recommend them to be visited except the fact that there is a cache there."

 

Either they are not being choosy enough or there is a real problem in determining which caches to search for and which to skip. I would think if you are not into numbers and have time to decide where to cache you could spend a bit more time picking out caches you are more likely to enjoy. We now have the favorite points to help find caches that stand out as more memorable or rewarding. And you can look at the logs and cache description to see if the cache has any purpose beside being just another cache to find. And if the GPS still leads you to a place where you would rather not be searching for a cache, you always have the choice to not search and simply move on to the next cache.

 

When I see a soft-serve ice cream machine, I order a different dessert :mmraspberry:

You forgot the Puritan word. <_<

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Yes, you are snobs. I say that not because you like what you like, or because you seek out a particular experience, but because when the experience doesn't live up to your dreams because the location isn't fabulous and the cache isn't huge, it seems as if you consider the entire experience ruined. It's as if you're outraged to be shown that the place you're visiting for the lovely scenery or the old world ambiance nevertheless has industrial estates.

 

By all means, pick and choose all you want, but don't blame the CO for choosing to put a cache somewhere that doesn't live up to your standards when you selection process fails.

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When I see a soft-serve ice cream machine, I order a different dessert :mmraspberry:
Sometimes, when I see a soft-serve ice cream machine, I have a root beer float for dessert. That's really the way to do it. Those people who have chocolate cake or apple pie for dessert... What are they thinking?!! :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
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Closely-related to the unattractive cache is the dangerous cache - great scenery, but you might walk over the cliff if you're staring at your GPS.

 

In April, 2004 (yes, not quite 10 years ago!), the Rockhounders said:

 

How do you know his GPSr said 25' to go? It went over the cliff with him while he was hiking.

 

No the cache owner does not have to tell him about the cliff. Mr.

X should look up from his GPSr now and then to see what is in store for him. If he doesn't he might miss some fantastic scenery.

 

Funny thing about being out in the back-country, you never know what's just around the bush. It may have been a Grizzly Bear that got him and dragged him over to the edge and dropped him (just tenderizing his supper).

 

John

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we’re getting fed up with being sent to places

For me, that's where you're going wrong. Nothing at all wrong with being selective about what caches you want to seek out. In fact, every single geocacher is individually selective about the caches they seek (just that some choose to select every cache, and others have vastly differing selection criteria). This game is a lot of different things to a lot of different people - what may be a lame non-scenic industrial *location* to you might be a really interesting and fun *contraption cache hide* for someone else.

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Yes, you are snobs. I say that not because you like what you like, or because you seek out a particular experience, but because when the experience doesn't live up to your dreams because the location isn't fabulous and the cache isn't huge, it seems as if you consider the entire experience ruined. It's as if you're outraged to be shown that the place you're visiting for the lovely scenery or the old world ambiance nevertheless has industrial estates.

 

By all means, pick and choose all you want, but don't blame the CO for choosing to put a cache somewhere that doesn't live up to your standards when you selection process fails.

 

I disagree with you and Dame Deco. We snobs prefer to be referred to as selective. :ph34r:

 

I do agree their selection process has failed in many cases. This selective cacher has to research pretty much every cache he goes for. True, sometimes this process is very easy; a local cache along a trail in a park, takes me about 10 seconds to determine that. Of course there's the extremely rare trash strewn area in the woods, or a homeless person living near Ground Zero. :)

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I know your feeling. We spent a long time qualifying for some interesting challenges and solving some high difficulty mysteries. They were all situated between two places relatively close to the place we used to live. We took the local train to the furthest away location and cycled one or two stations closer to home. Afterwards we felt like giving up geocaching, at least this type. We started out in a boring suburb, nothing to see, some caches behind small utility boxes. The majority were placed in an industrial area between both places, some hiding spots rather yucky, others just plain boring. Then another suburb. At least two caches were hidden in small wooded areas, but by that time we were so annoyed that those didn't get our spirits up anymore. Oh well...

 

Mrs. Terratin

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I wouldn't say you are a snob, but choosy, as others had said. I have often had high expectations of a cache, only to get there and do more CITO than caching - sometimes recording a DNF for the cache. hikers say "hike yourenjoy own hike", and I think caching is the same way. Look for what you want to look for, and enjoy the game. I tend to remember the drive to the cache, the scenery, etc. For every boring cache I've found, I can think of 5 that have given me some good memories, stories, and sometimes scars.

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...are we becoming Geocaching snobs...?

I would say no. You are simply exercising your personal preferences. Not unlike going through a buffet lne. Those folks who pass on the puréed beet pudding aren't snobs. They just have working taste buds. When I think "snob", especially within this hobby, I picture someone who is exercising their preferences, and being a real jerk about the process.

Edited by Clan Riffster
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Hi everyone !

 

I’m so pleased I posed this question and am honoured by the number of responses.

 

In considering the responses, I think/hope I was wrong in using the word ‘snob’. It’s not so much that we think we’re better than others it’s just that some of the different types of caching aren’t for us. We can understand the one on every mile post for miles and miles type although it’s not for us but we’re still struggling with what appears to be the ‘no apparent reason’ type of cache.

 

We would never be disparaging in our logs and would only ever just say TFTC if we couldn’t think of anything pleasant to say.

 

So, I hope I can use a suggestion and say we’re selective but despite doing the research we do sometimes feel a bit let down; that’s life though.

 

Just to respond to a few posts though.

Dame Deco – post #13 - I’m sorry if it appeared that I implied we look down our noses at others. That certainly was not my intention and I think by posing the question I wasn’t just trying to find others of a like mind. I take on board what you say about staring threads about adventures though and will post a thread about our recent adventures in Spain where our holiday was enhanced a great deal by one particular cache owner and their caches. Thanks for the idea.

 

Tozainamboku – post #16 - I think we’re still evolving our style of caching which is probably one of the reasons behind the original post. We are definitely ‘giving up’ and moving on quicker now on the few occasions when we find ourselves not enjoying the hunt. At first it was almost a matter of honour to try our hardest to make a find if we’d got to a location.

 

Dprovan – post #18 – Whoa ! Please don’t use emotive words like ‘ruined’ and ‘outraged’ to escalate my expression of ‘getting fed up’. I have said that we’re trying to be selective and I have not blamed any cache owner for anything – I may have used an example of a cache we didn’t like but at no time did I criticise any cache owner - we hope to become cache owners soon ourselves and we understand the work involved in setting and caring for a cache properly.

 

Funkymunkyzone – post #22 – Yup, understand where you’re coming from. We do ‘get’ the fun ‘contraption’ hides but I think we must just try harder to refine our selection process !

 

Manville-Possum Hubters – post #24 – OK, this is where I show my ignorance…….. Please, what are ‘PMO listings’ and what is a ‘known Waymarker’ ?

 

Mrs. Terratin – post #25 – yup, it seems to come down to research, research, research. Oh, and understanding what you personally want out of Geocaching. As I said previously, we’re still evolving; maybe one day we’ll develop into number chasers, I don’t think so but can’t rule it out.

 

Thanks to everyone for your thoughts. My conclusion is some more analysis to understand what we want out of Geocaching then more focused research and cutting our losses quicker if we get it wrong. We’ve already had so much out of this new hobby we just want it to get better.

 

Happy for more thoughts………………….

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I would say no. You are simply exercising your personal preferences. Not unlike going through a buffet lne. Those folks who pass on the puréed beet pudding aren't snobs. They just have working taste buds.

 

Good analogy. Some expect to put out anything and others will eat anything. When the varieties to choose from feature different versions of steaming dog poo you have to wonder. Hmm, should I take the dry gritty ones or the moist textured version? Unfoetunately saying thanks will often encourage more, and being honest will insult the chef who has all of 30 seconds invested. :rolleyes:

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I would say no. You are simply exercising your personal preferences. Not unlike going through a buffet lne. Those folks who pass on the puréed beet pudding aren't snobs. They just have working taste buds.

 

Good analogy. Some expect to put out anything and others will eat anything. When the varieties to choose from feature different versions of steaming dog poo you have to wonder. Hmm, should I take the dry gritty ones or the moist textured version? Unfoetunately saying thanks will often encourage more, and being honest will insult the chef who has all of 30 seconds invested. :rolleyes:

So be like CR when he gets to the buffet line and finds only puréed beet pudding, he passes on it. No requirement that he even taste it.

 

Some people think that once you hit "go" on the GPS you have to make an attempt to find the cache. They will spend hours searching a smelly dumpster and then reluctantly post a DNF when they finally give up (or a post a TFTC to thank the hider if they find the cache).

 

:mmraspberry: If there a soft-serve ice cream machine, order a different dessert. If you find only puréed beet pudding at the buffet, go somewhere else to eat. If you find yourself at a smelly dumpster, just move on.

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Manville-Possum Hubters – post #24 – OK, this is where I show my ignorance…….. Please, what are ‘PMO listings’ and what is a ‘known Waymarker’ ?

 

PMO is Premium Member Only listings, and Waymarking is a type of virtual geocaching that Groundspeak offers. Many of the moderators here are also Waymarkers, and I am VERY selective with my Waymarks, even more so than with geocaches.

On all geocache pages there is a link to nearest Waymarks, ect. It may be of interest to you. :) Now, off to go seek two geocaches that I have selected today. :D

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We can understand the one on every mile post for miles and miles type

 

If getting irritated by carpet-bomb hides makes one a snob then so be it.

 

Hiders that take up a whole trail system are greedy. I don't buy their argument that they are giving back to the community by getting people out on the trails, lured by the pill bottle behind every trail marker. Especially when they carpet bomb with cheap leaky containers that rarely if ever get maintained. A more inclusive, giving approach is to plant quality containers with a variety of hide styles, with room in between for others to hide and share the fun of cache ownership. Nope, I don't understand hiders who carpet bomb a trail or area, except that it's a promotion of the numbers game (or some type of land acquisition in an attempt to exclude other hiders).

 

We would never be in our logs and would only ever just say TFTC if we couldn't think of anything pleasant to say.

I wouldn't be disparaging but I would be critical if I feel the hider wasted my time and gas money. Especially if it feels like they tried to get past the micro filterers by posting a travel-size aspirin bottle/magnetic key holder/film canister as a "small" instead of a micro.

 

Instead of TFTC, I might write "I filter out micros because I don't enjoy log-only caches anymore. I was surprised to find a magnetic key holder listed as small." The filters are one of the ways I try to make the game more enjoyable for myself. When hiders don't play fair and ignore the size examples when filling out the cache listing form, I consider it rude. There are a lot of folks who try to get finders to visit their micro by deception, otherwise why is it that most hiders do not change the cache size when it's pointed out to them that the size is wrong? If someone's going to make people work hard to figure out a puzzle or accomplish a challenge, only to take them to a pill tin listed as a small, in a woodlot filled with garbage from the nearby apartment tenants, I'm going to say something in the log about the location and size. If speaking out is snobbish, so be it. If we don't speak out, or we imply thanks when we don't mean it, we encourage more of these.

Edited by L0ne.R
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If the fact that I won't get on my back and look up into the bowels of a newspaper rack make me a "Snob", I'll proudly wear the label. I also pass on wet stinky ivy hides. I don't mind LPCs, but will just keep driving if there is a car parked next to one. I have done many guardrail hides where the particular spots at the guardrails wasn't very appealing, but the 30 mile drive up the spectacular mountain road made it one of my more memorable geocaching experiences.

Edited by Don_J
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Selecting the type of cache you prefer to find is your right. I know that some people don't like my caches, and there are some types of caches I am not as fond of as well. Geocaching is a hobby, not a human right.

 

I suggest using the favorite points as a way to distinguish the wheat from the chaff. You do have to be a premium member to do so I believe.

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I suggest using the favorite points as a way to distinguish the wheat from the chaff. You do have to be a premium member to do so I believe.

Certainly around here that wouldn't necessarily work for the OP I'm afraid.

 

I'm fairly certain the large cache I found on Friday would be one they'd want to go and find. It's been there since 2005 and has 1 Favourite Point - nice bit of a walk and a nice hiding place and with an old log book that people have actually written whole paragraphs in.

 

The same number as a micro cache I found at the end of January that's hidden at a location where the sign prohibiting fly tipping <translation: dumping rubbish by the side of the road> has been ignored completely.

 

I find in general that favourite points in this part of the world tend to be given for the "cleverness" of the hiding spot rather than for the location of the geocache. That's fine - and I can understand it - but you have to appreciate that in order to use them effectively as a filter.

Edited by Blue Square Thing
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My husband and I have been caching now for just over two years. We’re both retired and not very fit so we don’t tend to go for high Terrain starred caches but we do enjoy being lead to places of scenic, historic or architectural etc. interest. We’ve decided we’re not into trying to reach high numbers of caches just for the sake of it although we do watch our number of finds with interest and not a little pride ! We also enjoy the fun of sending our own trackables on their way or helping other people’s little travellers on theirs.

 

Here’s the thing though. We’ve been very lucky to be able to cache in the UK, France, Spain and the USA and while we’ve been to some great places and found, and sometime not found, some great caches we’re getting fed up with being sent to places with absolutely nothing to recommend them to be visited except the fact that there is a cache there; usually a micro or a nano so not even a chance for trading or trackable exchange.

 

Sometimes we can suss this out before hand by using Google Maps but a few times we’ve been to places where to ‘Trash Out’ we’d have needed a mega-skip or a bulldozer and there's not even a view to cheer us up.

 

Our least favourite so far was the lamp post (aka dog pee tree :o ) on a walkway through an industrial estate.

 

So, this isn’t a question with a right/wrong answer I guess but are we becoming Geocaching snobs and can anyone else relate to our feelings ? B)

 

My type of geocaching almost mirrors yours. I've been called a snob and I've been ridiculed for my low find count (and I'm not including friends who good naturedly joke about it), but I don't care. I enjoy the sort of caches I enjoy and have no interest in the others.

 

I share some of your frustration. I try to filter out caches that don't interest me, but sometimes they get through. A misleading cache page write-up, misclassified sizes, maps and sat photos that don't tell the whole story.

 

When I started geocaching things were much different. Most caches brought you to someplace interesting because many of the early cache hiders used geocaching to show off their favorite locations. All you needed to do was load up your unit and follow your GPS to interesting and sometimes fascinating places. Once in a while there were clunkers, but they were rare enough that they were not an issue. Today finding the nuggets among the chaff takes work. Unfortunately, sometimes more work than I care to get involved with, so I don't geocache nearly as much as I used to.

Edited by briansnat
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I suggest using the favorite points as a way to distinguish the wheat from the chaff. You do have to be a premium member to do so I believe.

Certainly around here that wouldn't necessarily work for the OP I'm afraid.

 

I'm fairly certain the large cache I found on Friday would be one they'd want to go and find. It's been there since 2005 and has 1 Favourite Point - nice bit of a walk and a nice hiding place and with an old log book that people have actually written whole paragraphs in.

 

The same number as a micro cache I found at the end of January that's hidden at a location where the sign prohibiting fly tipping has been ignored completely.

 

I find in general that favourite points in this part of the world tend to be given for the "cleverness" of the hiding spot rather than for the location of the geocache. That's fine - and I can understand it - but you have to appreciate that in order to use them effectively as a filter.

 

I can't be the only American who had to Google "Fly Tipping". Before Googling it, I had no clue whatsoever what it was going to mean. :P

 

Eh, I'm pretty much on board with favorite points, I don't think you're going to find too many clunkers. Minor complaints I've had over the years are that most "evil micros" are going to get loaded up with fav's. And a "clever container" is always going to rack them up, regardless of location. For example, a birdhouse in a totally mundane (or even crappy) location. In an extreme case there, I'm familiar with someone who has hidden a lot of roadside park-n-grabs in store bought novelty containers; Star Wars, Lord of the rings, Looney Toons cartoons etc., who racks up the fav's. But in general, I'm quite happy using the favorite points system.

Edited by Mr.Yuck
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Geocaching is one of the only activities I can think of where a simple insistence on quality can be equated with snobbishness.

 

I don't mind a micro (or even, gasp! a nano) if it's done right. But all too often it seems that nowadays the micro is the standard go-to container preferred by many hiders, which is just sheer laziness in too many cases.

 

I mean, when you go out to a restaurant for dinner, you aren't a snob for feeling it's within your rights to expect your steak to be properly grilled instead of simply tossed in the microwave.

 

There are those who are fond of pointing out that the hider is doing you, as a cacher, a favor. They invest their time, money and effort (however minimal) for your benefit without asking anything but a simple "thank you" when you find the cache. But really, it's just like I invest my time, money, and effort in raising my dog, and if he happens to dump a load on my neighbor's lawn, my neighbor should thank me for helping to fertilize his grass, right? Right?

 

Now, I'll admit that the above example may not be perfect, but the underlying point remains true: a turd is a turd, and nobody is a snob for not being overjoyed when they find one, whether it's under a lamp post or on their front lawn.

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I can't be the only American who had to Google "Fly Tipping". Before Googling it, I had no clue whatsoever what it was going to mean. :P

 

Eh, I'm pretty much on board with favorite points, I don't think you're going to find too many clunkers... <snippage>

Ah - translation added for fly tipping :-)

 

I can see the advantages of favourites. They can help to uncover some interesting caches - certainly anything with >30 or so round here is likely to be interesting in itself. I just find I need to use other criteria most of the time as well - age and size tend to factor into things for me.

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I can't be the only American who had to Google "Fly Tipping". Before Googling it, I had no clue whatsoever what it was going to mean. :P

 

Eh, I'm pretty much on board with favorite points, I don't think you're going to find too many clunkers... <snippage>

Ah - translation added for fly tipping :-)

 

I can see the advantages of favourites. They can help to uncover some interesting caches - certainly anything with >30 or so round here is likely to be interesting in itself. I just find I need to use other criteria most of the time as well - age and size tend to factor into things for me.

 

I think FPs are the greatest thing since PQs, but I totally get what you're saying BST. I really enjoy a swag size, well-maintained, water tight container, preferably in a nice forest setting. But those caches usually get a couple of favorite points, maybe 3 tops, one of them being mine. But if you put a bison tube in a dollar store plastic frog and place it in a tree, bingo every third PM cacher will give it a point. Still, I'm glad for FPs. Especially when I set my filters to remove most of the stuff I don't like or don't want to do (micros, tree climbs), open the list, float the FPs to the top, then take time to read the comments. It's still requires some work, but nothing like what it use to be before favorite points.

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'GeoSnob' - I like the sound of that. Count me in. I like Rifster's analogy of the buffet. There have been a couple of times I have walked the line and sat down with only one or two items on my plate - of course, I never went back to that restaurant. Nobody says you have to look for, or find, every cache.

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We would never be disparaging in our logs and would only ever just say TFTC if we couldn’t think of anything pleasant to say.

 

No matter what you think of the cache, I would hope you would write more than just 'TFTC'. Even the lowliest of LPCs deserves more. You don't even have to write about the cache itself, but maybe what you are doing that day that brought you to the cache...like "found while out running errands nearby" or something to that effect. Writing "TFTC" is about the laziest thing you can write and if I could do so without making folks angry or getting a wrist slap from GS, I would delete any log like that from my cache pages.

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