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az_pistolero

Category proposal - Brick Roads

18 posts in this topic

I see no category exists to capture Brick Roads.

 

But as they are not a single point, how would they be located?

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Brick roads?

Could you please explain. Do you mean a street with cobblestones?

Do you have a sample pic?

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Brick roads are very rare where I live, so when I come across one, I'm a little afraid to drive on it.

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OK I asked Google ...

You're looking for streets made of bricks - not cobblestones. Right?

OK not too common.

Are pedestrian areas allowed?

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It depends on the definition of "brick."

And, as raised above, it depends on the definition of "road." Motorized traffic, pedestrian way?

 

And, it is also true, as you mention, that Waymarking something that is not a single point or well defined area is problematic. I faced this when creating a category for rivers. So, I settled on three possible points to waymark - where the river begins, ends, or joins another river. I can't think of a similar solution for a brick road which could be a few meters of preserved roadway, or many miles. So, my opinion is that his probably is not workable as a Waymarking category. But, someone else may have some better ideas.

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I will try posting a photo of an example, but the one I found is about one mile of road paved with bricks. This particular stretch of road is open to vehicular traffic, and is labeled as an historic location.

 

BTW, What would be the distinction between brick and cobblestone? Any masons in the house? :)

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If you guys accept a remark from me as a newbie: I'm not much in favor of it.

 

All brick roads that I know are in fact pedestrian zones like this one here. I have never seen such a "street" be in use for motorized traffic like regular cars. Does such thing exist? Where? Examples?

 

Cobble-stone "paved" streets exist many in Germany, for example (<- nice one!). But do we really need a catgory for that? Hm. And it was said in the first reply already: Where would you set the coordinates in a maybe long street?

 

Just my two Euro :anibad: cents ...

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If you guys accept a remark from me as a newbie: I'm not much in favor of it.

 

All brick roads that I know are in fact pedestrian zones like this one here. I have never seen such a "street" be in use for motorized traffic like regular cars. Does such thing exist? Where? Examples?

 

Cobble-stone "paved" streets exist many in Germany, for example (<- nice one!). But do we really need a catgory for that? Hm. And it was said in the first reply already: Where would you set the coordinates in a maybe long street?

 

Just my two Euro :anibad: cents ...

What about making it "Historic Brick Roads"? That would eliminate ones like in the first photo which are paved with modern bricks.

 

Another question would be whether they have to be clay bricks. There's a historic road in my city that's paved with wooden blocks, making it very unique. Would that be included?

 

I'd be in favour of this category and would love to be part of it, but something would have to be decided on the coordinate matter. That would take some more thought and discussion.

 

Edit to add: For anyone interested, here's a page that shows and talks about the above-referenced wood block road.

Edited by The A-Team
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Nacogdoches, TX - Quite a few brick roads in this town. And yes, you drive on them. The link below doesn't talk about the brick roads, there are just pictures of them.

 

Nacogdoches TX

 

I've seen quite a few in my travels, but I really can't remember the names. Most of them are in small towns in the downtown area. As for how you would waymark it, I would have to say that it would be one entry per town. Unless there are a LOT of brick paved roads.

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Brick or cobblestone roads are just ubiquitous in historic European town centers. They are rare in rural areas, but all in all there's a prevalence problem.

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Many brick raods in my town as well. Perhaps of some interest to the category is that many of the bricks used are marked by the manufacturer so age could be reasonably determined or at least the period could be defined.

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Far too rare in global terms. I wouldn't vote for it, I would vote against such category. Perhaps, and even so, I would hesitate, a more global category including roads with unusual pavement (non asphalt, non cobblestone).

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We still have one or two brick roads downtown where I live. They're only a block or two long, and they're slowly being patched over time with asphalt so I'm sure they'll disappear after a while, which makes me sad.

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Far too rare in global terms. I wouldn't vote for it, I would vote against such category. Perhaps, and even so, I would hesitate, a more global category including roads with unusual pavement (non asphalt, non cobblestone).

 

I have to disagree with you on a more basic level. Where does it say that all Waymarking categories must be accessible to all waymarkers within a certain distance? Waymarking was born out of Groundspeak's need to deal with locationless caches. The best of which were not ubiquitous retail chains or even more ubiquitous "Final Resting Places" but unique groups of objects or locations that took some work/planning/luck to find. I will reference the Toynbee Tiles category, one of the first approved. Several hundred total located in less than 30 cities. I am much more in favor of smaller, more interesting categories like this, than the man hole cover everyone has within two blocks of their house.

 

I would vote for a category like this if there was a way to establish location. Is it possible to require two locations when listing? One from each end of the street? and then to log a visit one location that falls somewhere in between the two?

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I have a habit of checking a person's Waymarking statistics to get an idea of how familiar they are with Waymarking: its peculiarities and current purposes (granted that those may have changed from Groundspeak's original intent). It's a natural habit. To me that is more important than how long someone has been a member of the Groundspeak sites, since someone could be a member since 2001 but really only understand the geocaching game. Just saying...

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