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Do you guys enable WAAS with your Garmin 60CSX and 62S?


Sgt_Strider
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I have both the Garmin 60CSX and the Garmin 62S. I didn't even know about WAAS until earlier today. Do you guys all turn it on?

 

I mainly use my handheld units for geotagging purposes. I don't even know if WAAS is turned on by default so I'm not sure if I have ever used it in the past. Does enabling WAAS improve accuracy? Will satellite lock speed increase?

 

How do I turn on WAAS for both the 60CSX and the 62S?

 

Thanks!

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Should be in Setup, System, GPS ...

 

I never use it though, where I am in the UK GPS + GLONASS is very accurate, and you can hardly ever get a WAAS/EGNOS signal.

 

When I could get one and did some experimentation it didn't help.

 

I forgot to mention that I live in North America. If I remember correctly, WAAS only works in North America? Neither the 60CSX or the 62S have GLONASS...

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Yes, if you can lock onto a WAAS satellite, your accuracy will increase a substantial amount.

 

Thanks for the information. So is WAAS located in Setup, System, GPS?

 

Anything else that I can enable to improve accuracy?

 

What if I fly over to China tomorrow? I know WAAS won't work over there and I know Japan have its own WAAS-equivalent. Should I turn it off in that case or I can just leave it on by default? If so, will it affect the accuracy of the unit?

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I have both the Garmin 60CSX and the Garmin 62S. I didn't even know about WAAS until earlier today. Do you guys all turn it on?

 

I mainly use my handheld units for geotagging purposes. I don't even know if WAAS is turned on by default so I'm not sure if I have ever used it in the past. Does enabling WAAS improve accuracy? Will satellite lock speed increase?

 

How do I turn on WAAS for both the 60CSX and the 62S?

 

Thanks!

I think the majority of users of those GPSes, at least in North America use the WAAS function, unless they're in a specific situation where they're trying to squeeze every last second out of a set of batteries...or they don't know about it. I've used a 76CSX and now a 62s and have enabled WAAS on both and never changed that setting. IIRC, WAAS is turned off as a factory default setting. For the 62s, from the Main Menu > Setup > System > GPS > WAAS/EGNOS.

 

Yes, it improves accuracy; no, it does not shorten satellite lock speed. Hope this helps.

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Yes, as I posted ... in Setup, System, GPS.

 

EGNOS is the EU WAAS equivalent, I still don't use it ... Red90's comment is worth commenting on. As he says, IF you can lock on ... often you won't get a signal. Second, my experimentation with EGNOS showed no noticeable difference, I guess it's possible WAAS may be different but I'm not aware of any reason why it would be better than EGNOS.

 

Some interesting comments here http://www.gpsreview.net/waas/

Edited by sussamb
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I have both the Garmin 60CSX and the Garmin 62S. I didn't even know about WAAS until earlier today. Do you guys all turn it on?

 

I mainly use my handheld units for geotagging purposes. I don't even know if WAAS is turned on by default so I'm not sure if I have ever used it in the past.

 

Does enabling WAAS improve accuracy?

 

Yes, but it also typically shortens battery life.

 

The WAAS specification requires it to provide a position accuracy of 25ft or better at least 95% of the time. If your EPE is constantly less than 25ft then your GPS is already preforming within the specifications of WAAS. However, many people get EPEs as good as 3ft with WAAS turned on and under the right conditions. At this point it's a judgment call based on your current needs.

 

Will satellite lock speed increase?

 

It really depends on a lot of changing factors but mostly no because that isn't a function of the WAAS system.

 

How do I turn on WAAS for both the 60CSX and the 62S?

 

I don't own either devices so I don't know off the top of my head but you can download the manuals from the Garmin support site. I'm sure the instructions are in there.

 

Thanks!

 

Your welcome!

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I think the majority of users of those GPSes, at least in North America use the WAAS function,

 

I forgot to add that WAAS is a location based service. It only works in North America because the WAAS satellites are in geostationary orbit only in the western hemisphere. Also the only ground stations, which are an important part of the system, are located in North America.

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Yes, if you can lock onto a WAAS satellite, your accuracy will increase a substantial amount.

 

Thanks for the information. So is WAAS located in Setup, System, GPS?

 

Anything else that I can enable to improve accuracy?

 

Make sure you are holding the GPS properly so that you are not blocking the antenna. If the GPS has an external antenna port buy and use an external antenna. Position the antenna as that it has a clear view of the sky.

 

What if I fly over to China tomorrow? I know WAAS won't work over there and I know Japan have its own WAAS-equivalent. Should I turn it off in that case or I can just leave it on by default? If so, will it affect the accuracy of the unit?

 

Once you leave North America you won't be close enough to any Reference Stations for WAAS corrections to matter even if you can receive a WAAS satellite. It won't improve accuracy but it won't degrade accuracy either. Leaving WAAS turned on could shorted the battery life.

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I have both the Garmin 60CSX and the Garmin 62S. I didn't even know about WAAS until earlier today. Do you guys all turn it on?

 

I mainly use my handheld units for geotagging purposes. I don't even know if WAAS is turned on by default so I'm not sure if I have ever used it in the past. Does enabling WAAS improve accuracy? Will satellite lock speed increase?

 

How do I turn on WAAS for both the 60CSX and the 62S?

 

Thanks!

I think the majority of users of those GPSes, at least in North America use the WAAS function, unless they're in a specific situation where they're trying to squeeze every last second out of a set of batteries...or they don't know about it. I've used a 76CSX and now a 62s and have enabled WAAS on both and never changed that setting. IIRC, WAAS is turned off as a factory default setting. For the 62s, from the Main Menu > Setup > System > GPS > WAAS/EGNOS.

 

Yes, it improves accuracy; no, it does not shorten satellite lock speed. Hope this helps.

 

+1.

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Keep in mind that turning WAAS on will also turn on EGNOS -- the European equivalent for those of you who live on the other side of the pond.

 

Is that a bad thing though? I thought it's already been said that there are no detrimental effect besides the additional loss of battery power?

 

On modern GPS units (which both referenced units are) there is no loss of battery life. The WAAS corrections are no longer done by the CPU but by an ASIC, which means that power-wise they are basically free.

 

There is never any reason not to turn WAAS/EGNOS on for a modern GPS unit.

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On modern GPS units (which both referenced units are) there is no loss of battery life. The WAAS corrections are no longer done by the CPU but by an ASIC, which means that power-wise they are basically free.

 

Really?

 

I did some testing when I got my Etrex 20 and with WAAS/EGNOS enabled battery life reduced by over 2 hours.

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On modern GPS units (which both referenced units are) there is no loss of battery life. The WAAS corrections are no longer done by the CPU but by an ASIC, which means that power-wise they are basically free.

 

Really?

 

I did some testing when I got my Etrex 20 and with WAAS/EGNOS enabled battery life reduced by over 2 hours.

 

I find fizzymagic's statement way too general. That work is done by an external component rather than the general CPU does not mean that battery life is unaffected.

Generally LESS affected though, yes; that's much of the point with releasing work from the CPU.

 

Running an eTrex 20/30 with a Glonass lock increases current draw with about 15% from running GPS-Only. I have verified this with a multimeter.

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I am very surprised that no one mentions an external antenna.The 60's series can use one,so can 76 series.My wife and I hike all the national forests and believe me,the external antenna is a must for drawing in the sats signals.Try one and you will see for yourself.They are relatively inexpensive,we use gillson antennas,but,there are others.Many gpsr's don't have the connection and that is unfortunate.

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I am very surprised that no one mentions an external antenna.The 60's series can use one,so can 76 series.My wife and I hike all the national forests and believe me,the external antenna is a must for drawing in the sats signals.Try one and you will see for yourself.They are relatively inexpensive,we use gillson antennas,but,there are others.Many gpsr's don't have the connection and that is unfortunate.

 

The 62/78 and Montana also have external antenna connectors. We used the connector on my wife's Montana when her internal antenna broke off the circuit board.

Edited by Dr Jeckyl and Mr Hide
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On modern GPS units (which both referenced units are) there is no loss of battery life. The WAAS corrections are no longer done by the CPU but by an ASIC, which means that power-wise they are basically free.

 

Really?

 

I did some testing when I got my Etrex 20 and with WAAS/EGNOS enabled battery life reduced by over 2 hours.

 

I find fizzymagic's statement way too general. That work is done by an external component rather than the general CPU does not mean that battery life is unaffected.

Generally LESS affected though, yes; that's much of the point with releasing work from the CPU.

 

Running an eTrex 20/30 with a Glonass lock increases current draw with about 15% from running GPS-Only. I have verified this with a multimeter.

 

Hmm. I am surprised by that. Of course, the ETrex was not mentioned in the OP, but I would think even for a low-end GPS like it the WAAS would not use that much power. But I can't argue with measurements.

 

I still see no reason to not have it enabled, even outside the US and Europe, as some of the corrections are global.

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I still see no reason to not have it enabled, even outside the US and Europe, as some of the corrections are global.

 

Don't you have be in the footprint of one of the WAAS satellites to get WAAS corrections. I'm not sure how EGNOS works. Are they not geostationary like WAAS?

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I still see no reason to not have it enabled, even outside the US and Europe, as some of the corrections are global.

 

Don't you have be in the footprint of one of the WAAS satellites to get WAAS corrections. I'm not sure how EGNOS works. Are they not geostationary like WAAS?

 

Afaik, it's exactly the same setup and radio interface as WAAS albeit with different satellites.

 

Re increased current consumption with WAAS, I haven't checked that on my receiver. I know though, that many show significantly increased current consumption during the acquisition phase. And since in northern Europe it's very hard to get an EGNOS lock (in 60ºN Stockholm nearly impossible, unless one sees the low southern horizon perfectly, on a boat one might have some luck), it will just stay in acquisition all the time... (probably not nearly as bad as staying in GPS acquisition mode though).

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I still see no reason to not have it enabled, even outside the US and Europe, as some of the corrections are global.

 

Don't you have be in the footprint of one of the WAAS satellites to get WAAS corrections. I'm not sure how EGNOS works. Are they not geostationary like WAAS?

 

Afaik, it's exactly the same setup and radio interface as WAAS albeit with different satellites.

 

Re increased current consumption with WAAS, I haven't checked that on my receiver. I know though, that many show significantly increased current consumption during the acquisition phase. And since in northern Europe it's very hard to get an EGNOS lock (in 60ºN Stockholm nearly impossible, unless one sees the low southern horizon perfectly, on a boat one might have some luck), it will just stay in acquisition all the time... (probably not nearly as bad as staying in GPS acquisition mode though).

 

I was talking specifically about the satellite or space component. If you routinely have trouble obtaining the signal at high latitudes then that is an indication that the satellites are geostationary because geostationary satellites are typically placed above the equator.

 

I've always though of the receiver in the GPSr as passive very passive. Now I wonder if it isn't doing something to boost the signal. The problem with increasing the gain on any receiver is that you not only get an increase in signal strength but you also get an increase in overall noise. Maybe there is little DSP (Digital Signal Processing) going on. Something like that would create some extra current draw.

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I was talking specifically about the satellite or space component. If you routinely have trouble obtaining the signal at high latitudes then that is an indication that the satellites are geostationary because geostationary satellites are typically placed above the equator.

 

I've always though of the receiver in the GPSr as passive very passive. Now I wonder if it isn't doing something to boost the signal. The problem with increasing the gain on any receiver is that you not only get an increase in signal strength but you also get an increase in overall noise. Maybe there is little DSP (Digital Signal Processing) going on. Something like that would create some extra current draw.

 

Yep, I understood that; that's what I meant with "same setup". And yes the satellite is geostationary. It is not many degrees over the horizon here.

 

There is not only a "little" DSP going on, but a lot of it these days for sure! As I have understood it, the noise can actually often overpower the GPS signal by many many times after even after exiting the analog receiver/filter part. However, a modern GPS runs time-correlation over hundreds or thousands of received data blocks if necessary to pick out a "position message" - therefore increasing the effective SNR by tens of times artificially. I would guess the ASIC in a modern GPS receiver contains those time correlator structures in hardware.

Edited by tr_s
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I still see no reason to not have it enabled, even outside the US and Europe, as some of the corrections are global.

 

Don't you have be in the footprint of one of the WAAS satellites to get WAAS corrections.

 

No. Only the ionospheric delay corrections require being in the footprint. The ephemeris and clock corrections work globally. Of course, you have to be able to see the GEO satellite, but with EGNOS and WAAS you can see them from the majority of the Earth.

Edited by fizzymagic
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WAAS is helpful in getting a better signal. While considering the topics in this discussion I happened to discover the dark side of WAAS:

 

http://www.gpsfaqs.org/faqs/magellan/explorist/exploristxl/usage.html

 

WAAS killed the Magellan XL. I ran across someone trying to sell one on Ebay and he was clueless as to why he could not get a signal. As our GPS's age and technology progresses there may be future victims of WAAS.

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Should be in Setup, System, GPS ...

 

I never use it though, where I am in the UK GPS + GLONASS is very accurate, and you can hardly ever get a WAAS/EGNOS signal.

 

When I could get one and did some experimentation it didn't help.

The EGNOS satellites in the UK are about 25 degrees above the horizon and it's not difficult to get a signal at all. Only if your southern horizon is obscured with mountains/buildings/trees will there be a problem. For more info about EGNOS in the UK (and the description also applies to WAAS in the the continental USA) see my resource site here.

 

Don't forget by the way. If the guy who placed the cache had poor accuracy it won't matter if your GPS is pinpoint accurate to 1 inch... it will only show you where the other guys GPS thought it was!

 

Chris

Graculus

Volunteer UK Reviewer for geocaching.com

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UK Geocaching Wiki

Geocaching.com Help Center

UK Geocaching Information & Resources website

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Should be in Setup, System, GPS ...

 

I never use it though, where I am in the UK GPS + GLONASS is very accurate, and you can hardly ever get a WAAS/EGNOS signal.

 

When I could get one and did some experimentation it didn't help.

The EGNOS satellites in the UK are about 25 degrees above the horizon and it's not difficult to get a signal at all. Only if your southern horizon is obscured with mountains/buildings/trees will there be a problem.

 

Well I guess I could change where I walk/cache, but then again I'm not prepared to, simply to get an EGNOS signal when tests I did in the Isle of Wight, where I was able to get a signal, showed no discernible improvement over only having GPS + GLONASS enabled :)

 

You also say in the article you link to "it may be difficult to get a clear view of them" and that's exactly my experience :)

Edited by sussamb
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I still see no reason to not have it enabled, even outside the US and Europe, as some of the corrections are global.

 

Don't you have be in the footprint of one of the WAAS satellites to get WAAS corrections.

 

No. Only the ionospheric delay corrections require being in the footprint. The ephemeris and clock corrections work globally. Of course, you have to be able to see the GEO satellite, but with EGNOS and WAAS you can see them from the majority of the Earth.

 

I think I see what you are saying now. You are combining WAAS and EGNOS because they have the same function. I wasn't considering EGNOS. I still stand by comment that you need to be in the footprint of a WAAS satellite to get WAAS corrections but I'll add that you need to be in the footprint of an EGNOS satellite to get EGNOS corrections.

 

I understand that the ephemeris and clock corrections work globally but is that information being transmitted from all GPS satellites are just the WAAS/EGNOS satellites? There is a distinct difference between the information working globally and having global access to the information. I suppose if you had a high enough antenna...

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