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Ammo boxes should be banned


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:blink:

 

does one lose points for plagiarizing a 10-year-old thread?

 

Will Jeremy make a special appearance to close this thread, too?

 

:omnomnom:

 

This is is one of those "get 'em fired up" threads like the ones by Mr. Controversy, the guy who ends his name with a "!". <_<

Is it? There is nobody fired up in the original, as they can tell its humor. It would rather show how much things have changed.

Edited by 4wheelin_fool
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I've been thinking about making a HUGE geocache and one of the local elementary schools gave me permission to hide one one their property. I'm think about taking an old van, the kind that is big enough to use as a camper, and parking it outside the school and hanging a sign that says "Free Candy". I really think the kids will appreciate it and it should get lot of favorite points.

Dude! That's an awesome idea!

You should paint the windows over so muggles can't see the cache inside...

I'll wear my free candy van caching outfit.

 

2uh1nk0.jpg

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Can anybody here actually afford to buy Tupperware* for their cache containers? For that matter, has anybody here ever found Tupperware in the woods? I know I haven't. :unsure:

 

*Tupperware

My wife sells tupperware, so yes, I have used tupperware. However, I find that finders cant seem to figure out how to close the lid properly, so square loc-n-lock seems to work better.

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I like the W/P Plano boxes that fishers use. They really are water proof and cheaper and more durable for geocache containers than dry boxes of other types. Ammo cans are too often stolen, so I won't hide them as a geocache container anymore. Filling them with ammo and hiding them is a different subject. :laughing:

 

I usually get some braided stainless steel cable and attach my ammo cans to the tree it is hiding behind, haven't had one go missing yet, even after one being under 17 feet of flood water.

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I like the W/P Plano boxes that fishers use. They really are water proof and cheaper and more durable for geocache containers than dry boxes of other types. Ammo cans are too often stolen, so I won't hide them as a geocache container anymore. Filling them with ammo and hiding them is a different subject. :laughing:

 

I usually get some braided stainless steel cable and attach my ammo cans to the tree it is hiding behind, haven't had one go missing yet, even after one being under 17 feet of flood water.

Tethers are wonderful things. They accomplish two things simply by being there. First, they keep critters from wandering off with your cache, and second, (and most important), they make a statement to anyone who discovers the cache that it was placed for a purpose, and that it belongs right where it is. If all you worry about is critters, a tether need not be more than a stout piece of rope. But a muggle with larceny in their hearts may untie or cut a rope, to gain themselves the really neat metal box they found in the woods. For them, a chain or cable is a much better option.

 

In either case, nothing will stop a committed thief. If a person is utterly dedicated to stealing your box, they will do so, every time. The most you can do is make your tether strong enough to make them decide it isn't worth the effort. Cable does this nicely.

 

How do you join the ends of your cable? U shaped clamps?

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How do you join the ends of your cable? U shaped clamps?

 

I needed to secure a large, unusual cache and was able to do it in a relatively simple and inexpensive way by purchasing a cycle lock from the local Pound Shop (equivalent of a US Dollar Store).

 

It's steel cable with a plastic sleeve - strong and comparatively weatherproof.

 

I fixed an eye bolt to the cache itself - in fact the bolt's intended use is as an anchor point for a car seat belt B)

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I like the W/P Plano boxes that fishers use. They really are water proof and cheaper and more durable for geocache containers than dry boxes of other types. Ammo cans are too often stolen, so I won't hide them as a geocache container anymore. Filling them with ammo and hiding them is a different subject. :laughing:

 

I usually get some braided stainless steel cable and attach my ammo cans to the tree it is hiding behind, haven't had one go missing yet, even after one being under 17 feet of flood water.

Tethers are wonderful things. They accomplish two things simply by being there. First, they keep critters from wandering off with your cache, and second, (and most important), they make a statement to anyone who discovers the cache that it was placed for a purpose, and that it belongs right where it is. If all you worry about is critters, a tether need not be more than a stout piece of rope. But a muggle with larceny in their hearts may untie or cut a rope, to gain themselves the really neat metal box they found in the woods. For them, a chain or cable is a much better option.

 

In either case, nothing will stop a committed thief. If a person is utterly dedicated to stealing your box, they will do so, every time. The most you can do is make your tether strong enough to make them decide it isn't worth the effort. Cable does this nicely.

 

How do you join the ends of your cable? U shaped clamps?

 

I use a crimped sleeve to attach it, a lot easier to make sure it isn't going to come free.

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I like the W/P Plano boxes that fishers use. They really are water proof and cheaper and more durable for geocache containers than dry boxes of other types. Ammo cans are too often stolen, so I won't hide them as a geocache container anymore. Filling them with ammo and hiding them is a different subject. :laughing:

 

I usually get some braided stainless steel cable and attach my ammo cans to the tree it is hiding behind, haven't had one go missing yet, even after one being under 17 feet of flood water.

There was an ammo can around here that recently went missing, even though it was chained to a tree to keep it from floating away during high water times.

Partying kids found a way to steal it anyway after it being in place for many years.

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Personally, I like ammo cans. Where can I buy them in the UK though? Any ideas...ebay had some but wondered if anyone can recommend a good supplier?

 

Too bad you don't have Walmart stores over there! I was surprised to see that Walmart here in Austin Tx was selling them. They had whole slew of them in their Sporting Goods Dept! I know where to go if I ever want to set up cache now!

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In either case, nothing will stop a committed thief. If a person is utterly dedicated to stealing your box, they will do so, every time. The most you can do is make your tether strong enough to make them decide it isn't worth the effort. Cable does this nicely.

 

 

I went to find a cache outside of Baker Ca. The description said it was an ammo can chained to a cactus. When I arrived, I found a freshly cut down 8' cactus and no ammo can. The going rate for ammo cans was about $6 back then. Some idiot sacrificed an 8' cactus to save $6.

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Ammo boxes can easily be mistaken as terrorist bombs, etc. They can get rusty and cut your fingers up, and they smell funny sometimes, I think the smell might be toxic or something. This one time a kid found an ammo box and decided to use ammo for other purposes, and this is no good! I also hear that sometimes potheads use ammoboxes to store their weed and that isn't good either because somebody might put weed in a geocache and then kids could also find that, which would be bad because the kids should be out finding regular geocaches, the good kind in tupperware, because those are nice.

 

We don'd need stinky metal boxes stinking up the game, let's stick with tupperware, its what works and it doesn't leak at all.

Ammo cans are the best ammio cans always get a favorite point in my books

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Ammo boxes can easily be mistaken as terrorist bombs, etc. They can get rusty and cut your fingers up, and they smell funny sometimes, I think the smell might be toxic or something. This one time a kid found an ammo box and decided to use ammo for other purposes, and this is no good! I also hear that sometimes potheads use ammoboxes to store their weed and that isn't good either because somebody might put weed in a geocache and then kids could also find that, which would be bad because the kids should be out finding regular geocaches, the good kind in tupperware, because those are nice.

 

We don'd need stinky metal boxes stinking up the game, let's stick with tupperware, its what works and it doesn't leak at all.

Ammo cans are the best ammio cans always get a favorite point in my books

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Personally, I like ammo cans. Where can I buy them in the UK though? Any ideas...ebay had some but wondered if anyone can recommend a good supplier?

 

Too bad you don't have Walmart stores over there!

 

Well, I don't know if I'd go that far...

 

anyway...I'll have to check mine out. I generally avoid Walmart like the plague, but if they have ammo boxes I may have finally found a reason not to.

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Path of least resistance!

 

21969_700x700.jpg

 

(I need some fire wood anyway... ~shrug~ )

 

:anitongue:

C'mon, I thought everyone in this smart group knew that Stihl saws were better! B)

 

Just heard a news story like this. The guy chained his bicycle to a support beam on his porch. Later the bike and the support post were gone. :o

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:blink:

 

does one lose points for plagiarizing a 10-year-old thread?

 

Will Jeremy make a special appearance to close this thread, too?

 

:omnomnom:

 

This is is one of those "get 'em fired up" threads like the ones by Mr. Controversy, the guy who ends his name with a "!". <_<

Is it? There is nobody fired up in the original, as they can tell its humor. It would rather show how much things have changed.

Right, & my comment is light humor also. ;)

 

Haven't heard from Roman! in a few days. Are you filling in for him while he's on vacation? :lol:

Edited by wmpastor
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Personally, I like ammo cans. Where can I buy them in the UK though? Any ideas...ebay had some but wondered if anyone can recommend a good supplier?

 

Too bad you don't have Walmart stores over there!

 

Well, I don't know if I'd go that far...

 

anyway...I'll have to check mine out. I generally avoid Walmart like the plague, but if they have ammo boxes I may have finally found a reason not to.

I treat Target the same way. I get a feeling akin to physical repulsion just driving by.

But they have a $1 aisle up front that has great swag.

Sometimes you just gotta hold your nose and cross the threshold. :lol:

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Personally, I like ammo cans. Where can I buy them in the UK though? Any ideas...ebay had some but wondered if anyone can recommend a good supplier?

 

Too bad you don't have Walmart stores over there!

 

Well, I don't know if I'd go that far...

 

anyway...I'll have to check mine out. I generally avoid Walmart like the plague, but if they have ammo boxes I may have finally found a reason not to.

 

Chinese made ammo boxes? Cool.

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But I thought that those odd bits of wire sticking out of the ammo can made good camo, you know like vines and stuff. And I couldn't make it chirp like a cricket, so I put a clock inside it so that it would tick instead. And then I didn't want anyone who accidentally found it messing with it so I wrote "Danger this is a bomb do not touch" on it. That's ok, right?

Only if you hide it in a highly public spot. Any mechanical clock, with ticking loud enough to be heard from inside an ammo can, is gonna be a battery hog. If you hide this way out in the woods, where the numbers oriented cachers rarely roam, the batteries will die betwixt finds. Put it somewhere that the P&G crowd will appreciate, like under the steps of a courthouse, next to an active rail road track or under a highway overpass and you'll be fine.

I've been thinking about making a HUGE geocache and one of the local elementary schools gave me permission to hide one one their property. I'm think about taking an old van, the kind that is big enough to use as a camper, and parking it outside the school and hanging a sign that says "Free Candy". I really think the kids will appreciate it and it should get lot of favorite points.

Dude! That's an awesome idea!

You should paint the windows over so muggles can't see the cache inside...

 

And put a mattress inside so cachers can rest after they find it...

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It does not matter what you hide somebody will call it a bomb.

I have a number of PVC pipe types made up to look like Wasp nest or bee hive.

HMMM!! Buzz Bomb? some even look like an egg pod from Aliens.

Look out for Sygorney Weaver something might explode from her chest!

Edited by Mn-treker
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Look out for Sygorney Weaver something might explode from her chest!

Great, now you tell me. This morning I hid a Sygorney Weaver shaped cache in the Walmart parking lot.

 

How on earth did you manage to squeeze her under the lamp post skirt? :blink:

Sygorney Weaver is a lot smaller than Sigourney Weaver the actress! They are talking about a reduced size clone.

 

Doug 7rxc

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Ammo boxes can easily be mistaken as terrorist bombs, etc. They can get rusty and cut your fingers up, and they smell funny sometimes, I think the smell might be toxic or something. This one time a kid found an ammo box and decided to use ammo for other purposes, and this is no good! I also hear that sometimes potheads use ammoboxes to store their weed and that isn't good either because somebody might put weed in a geocache and then kids could also find that, which would be bad because the kids should be out finding regular geocaches, the good kind in tupperware, because those are nice.

 

We don'd need stinky metal boxes stinking up the game, let's stick with tupperware, its what works and it doesn't leak at all.

I love the ammo boxes ....great. sway, I hope the keep them

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In all seriousness...almost every ammo box I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- sitting uncovered next to a big tree

- sitting uncovered next to a little tree

- sitting slightly covered in a hollow of a tree

- sitting uncovered in the hollow of a tree

- sitting slightly covered by a plank of tree bark inside a fallen, rotten tree trunk.

 

I understand the size and shape of these things limit what one can do with them...but it's rare to see a truly creative ammo box hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

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Ammo boxes encourage lazy hiders. I have a couple that have been out over ten years and I have never had to do maintenance on them. Leaky Tupperware is much better because it makes the cache owner go out and visit his/her caches more often!

 

Just because nobody's complained or posted a Needs Maintenance doesn't mean your cache is OK. I've found some of mine in bad shape even after previous finders stated the caches were in great shape. One was full of junk and the camo had worn off. Another was covered in sticky sap. Nobody said a word.

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In all seriousness...almost every ammo box I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- sitting uncovered next to a big tree

- sitting uncovered next to a little tree

- sitting slightly covered in a hollow of a tree

- sitting uncovered in the hollow of a tree

- sitting slightly covered by a plank of tree bark inside a fallen, rotten tree trunk.

 

I understand the size and shape of these things limit what one can do with them...but it's rare to see a truly creative ammo box hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

 

In all seriousness...almost every film can I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- stuffed under a lamp post kilt

- stuffed into a guardrail at an uninspired locale

- stuffed into the base of a street sign

- stuffed into a hedge at a fast food joint

- stuffed in electrical equipment

 

I understand the size and shape of these things gives practically limitless opportunities for hiding spots, from the utterly mundane to the amazingly interesting....but it's incredibly rare to see even a drop of creativity in a film can hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

 

Frankly, given the option of an uncreative film can hide in a Burger King hedge, or an uncreative ammo can hide deep in the forest, I'll take the ammo can in the woods every time. If I have a choice on where to spend what little recreational time I have, it won't be in an exhaust laden, sweltering, SUV filled parking lot.

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In all seriousness...almost every ammo box I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- sitting uncovered next to a big tree

- sitting uncovered next to a little tree

- sitting slightly covered in a hollow of a tree

- sitting uncovered in the hollow of a tree

- sitting slightly covered by a plank of tree bark inside a fallen, rotten tree trunk.

 

I understand the size and shape of these things limit what one can do with them...but it's rare to see a truly creative ammo box hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

 

In all seriousness...almost every film can I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- stuffed under a lamp post kilt

- stuffed into a guardrail at an uninspired locale

- stuffed into the base of a street sign

- stuffed into a hedge at a fast food joint

- stuffed in electrical equipment

 

I understand the size and shape of these things gives practically limitless opportunities for hiding spots, from the utterly mundane to the amazingly interesting....but it's incredibly rare to see even a drop of creativity in a film can hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

 

Frankly, given the option of an uncreative film can hide in a Burger King hedge, or an uncreative ammo can hide deep in the forest, I'll take the ammo can in the woods every time. If I have a choice on where to spend what little recreational time I have, it won't be in an exhaust laden, sweltering, SUV filled parking lot.

 

Well, I've seen plenty of creative film can hides far beyond what you describe...but I'm not in any way defending the use of film cans.

 

And I must say it is slightly disappointing to trudge half a mile down a scenic trail only to spot an ammo box laying out in the open next to a rotten stump.

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In all seriousness...almost every ammo box I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- sitting uncovered next to a big tree

- sitting uncovered next to a little tree

- sitting slightly covered in a hollow of a tree

- sitting uncovered in the hollow of a tree

- sitting slightly covered by a plank of tree bark inside a fallen, rotten tree trunk.

 

I understand the size and shape of these things limit what one can do with them...but it's rare to see a truly creative ammo box hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

 

In all seriousness...almost every film can I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- stuffed under a lamp post kilt

- stuffed into a guardrail at an uninspired locale

- stuffed into the base of a street sign

- stuffed into a hedge at a fast food joint

- stuffed in electrical equipment

 

I understand the size and shape of these things gives practically limitless opportunities for hiding spots, from the utterly mundane to the amazingly interesting....but it's incredibly rare to see even a drop of creativity in a film can hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

 

Frankly, given the option of an uncreative film can hide in a Burger King hedge, or an uncreative ammo can hide deep in the forest, I'll take the ammo can in the woods every time. If I have a choice on where to spend what little recreational time I have, it won't be in an exhaust laden, sweltering, SUV filled parking lot.

 

Well, I've seen plenty of creative film can hides far beyond what you describe...but I'm not in any way defending the use of film cans.

 

And I must say it is slightly disappointing to trudge half a mile down a scenic trail only to spot an ammo box laying out in the open next to a rotten stump.

For those who don't love the fascination which Nature brings to every showing, I suppose that might be true. Falling back on personal preference, if I make a half mile hike into the woods, I am quite simply delighted. If there happens to be an ammo can there, even better. I reckon if I were a city guy, who delighted in things like smog, traffic jams and endless concrete, a half mile hike in the woods might be a negative experience.

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In all seriousness...almost every ammo box I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- sitting uncovered next to a big tree

- sitting uncovered next to a little tree

- sitting slightly covered in a hollow of a tree

- sitting uncovered in the hollow of a tree

- sitting slightly covered by a plank of tree bark inside a fallen, rotten tree trunk.

 

I understand the size and shape of these things limit what one can do with them...but it's rare to see a truly creative ammo box hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

 

In all seriousness...almost every film can I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- stuffed under a lamp post kilt

- stuffed into a guardrail at an uninspired locale

- stuffed into the base of a street sign

- stuffed into a hedge at a fast food joint

- stuffed in electrical equipment

 

I understand the size and shape of these things gives practically limitless opportunities for hiding spots, from the utterly mundane to the amazingly interesting....but it's incredibly rare to see even a drop of creativity in a film can hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

 

Frankly, given the option of an uncreative film can hide in a Burger King hedge, or an uncreative ammo can hide deep in the forest, I'll take the ammo can in the woods every time. If I have a choice on where to spend what little recreational time I have, it won't be in an exhaust laden, sweltering, SUV filled parking lot.

 

Well, I've seen plenty of creative film can hides far beyond what you describe...but I'm not in any way defending the use of film cans.

 

And I must say it is slightly disappointing to trudge half a mile down a scenic trail only to spot an ammo box laying out in the open next to a rotten stump.

For those who don't love the fascination which Nature brings to every showing, I suppose that might be true. Falling back on personal preference, if I make a half mile hike into the woods, I am quite simply delighted. If there happens to be an ammo can there, even better. I reckon if I were a city guy, who delighted in things like smog, traffic jams and endless concrete, a half mile hike in the woods might be a negative experience.

 

Your prejudices are showing. I like any cache that takes me any place I had not previously been...any secret park, hidden corner, famous landmark or scenic backwood. A city does not necessarily equal "smog, traffic jams and endless concrete". That's just silliness. Likewise, nature does not necessarily equal automatic beauty and calmness. There is beauty and chaos in either and it's rather sad you discount the city so easily. Sad that anyone does.

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In all seriousness...almost every ammo box I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- sitting uncovered next to a big tree

- sitting uncovered next to a little tree

- sitting slightly covered in a hollow of a tree

- sitting uncovered in the hollow of a tree

- sitting slightly covered by a plank of tree bark inside a fallen, rotten tree trunk.

 

I understand the size and shape of these things limit what one can do with them...but it's rare to see a truly creative ammo box hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

 

In all seriousness...almost every film can I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- stuffed under a lamp post kilt

- stuffed into a guardrail at an uninspired locale

- stuffed into the base of a street sign

- stuffed into a hedge at a fast food joint

- stuffed in electrical equipment

 

I understand the size and shape of these things gives practically limitless opportunities for hiding spots, from the utterly mundane to the amazingly interesting....but it's incredibly rare to see even a drop of creativity in a film can hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

 

Frankly, given the option of an uncreative film can hide in a Burger King hedge, or an uncreative ammo can hide deep in the forest, I'll take the ammo can in the woods every time. If I have a choice on where to spend what little recreational time I have, it won't be in an exhaust laden, sweltering, SUV filled parking lot.

 

Well, I've seen plenty of creative film can hides far beyond what you describe...but I'm not in any way defending the use of film cans.

 

And I must say it is slightly disappointing to trudge half a mile down a scenic trail only to spot an ammo box laying out in the open next to a rotten stump.

For those who don't love the fascination which Nature brings to every showing, I suppose that might be true. Falling back on personal preference, if I make a half mile hike into the woods, I am quite simply delighted. If there happens to be an ammo can there, even better. I reckon if I were a city guy, who delighted in things like smog, traffic jams and endless concrete, a half mile hike in the woods might be a negative experience.

 

Your prejudices are showing. I like any cache that takes me any place I had not previously been...any secret park, hidden corner, famous landmark or scenic backwood. A city does not necessarily equal "smog, traffic jams and endless concrete". That's just silliness. Likewise, nature does not necessarily equal automatic beauty and calmness. There is beauty and chaos in either and it's rather sad you discount the city so easily. Sad that anyone does.

My discounting of the city does not "come easy", contrary to your theory. Rather, it comes from a lifetime of experience with cities, and with natural lands. With that in mind, I have no qualms admitting that I have a preference for natural lands, over concrete. Just a quirk, I suppose. I will commend you for liking any cache which takes you to a place you had not seen before. You are obviously way more tolerant than I am. In reminiscence of past locations caching has brought me, I recall a dumpster behind a Dollar General store which I had never seen before. A porta potty next to a sewer outlet which I had not seen before. A diaper choked alley betwixt two foreclosed buildings, one of which had squatters living in it. The lack of running water apparently led the squatters to use the alley as their latrine, as well as a place to store used diapers and other refuse.

 

I had never seen that alley before.

 

Based on your criteria, I have no doubt you would have loved all three.

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In all seriousness...almost every ammo box I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- sitting uncovered next to a big tree

- sitting uncovered next to a little tree

- sitting slightly covered in a hollow of a tree

- sitting uncovered in the hollow of a tree

- sitting slightly covered by a plank of tree bark inside a fallen, rotten tree trunk.

 

I understand the size and shape of these things limit what one can do with them...but it's rare to see a truly creative ammo box hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

 

In all seriousness...almost every film can I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- stuffed under a lamp post kilt

- stuffed into a guardrail at an uninspired locale

- stuffed into the base of a street sign

- stuffed into a hedge at a fast food joint

- stuffed in electrical equipment

 

I understand the size and shape of these things gives practically limitless opportunities for hiding spots, from the utterly mundane to the amazingly interesting....but it's incredibly rare to see even a drop of creativity in a film can hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

 

Frankly, given the option of an uncreative film can hide in a Burger King hedge, or an uncreative ammo can hide deep in the forest, I'll take the ammo can in the woods every time. If I have a choice on where to spend what little recreational time I have, it won't be in an exhaust laden, sweltering, SUV filled parking lot.

 

Well, I've seen plenty of creative film can hides far beyond what you describe...but I'm not in any way defending the use of film cans.

 

And I must say it is slightly disappointing to trudge half a mile down a scenic trail only to spot an ammo box laying out in the open next to a rotten stump.

For those who don't love the fascination which Nature brings to every showing, I suppose that might be true. Falling back on personal preference, if I make a half mile hike into the woods, I am quite simply delighted. If there happens to be an ammo can there, even better. I reckon if I were a city guy, who delighted in things like smog, traffic jams and endless concrete, a half mile hike in the woods might be a negative experience.

I could take you to a couple of places in the country that you would absolutely hate, active landfill, ODoT dumping grounds for roadkill, rural sewage treatment plants, sulfur springs (shall I continue?).

Link to comment

In all seriousness...almost every ammo box I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- sitting uncovered next to a big tree

- sitting uncovered next to a little tree

- sitting slightly covered in a hollow of a tree

- sitting uncovered in the hollow of a tree

- sitting slightly covered by a plank of tree bark inside a fallen, rotten tree trunk.

 

I understand the size and shape of these things limit what one can do with them...but it's rare to see a truly creative ammo box hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

 

In all seriousness...almost every film can I've found has been one or more of the following:

 

- stuffed under a lamp post kilt

- stuffed into a guardrail at an uninspired locale

- stuffed into the base of a street sign

- stuffed into a hedge at a fast food joint

- stuffed in electrical equipment

 

I understand the size and shape of these things gives practically limitless opportunities for hiding spots, from the utterly mundane to the amazingly interesting....but it's incredibly rare to see even a drop of creativity in a film can hide. None of those above are creative hides, by the way...unless "been done before a million times" counts as creative.

 

Frankly, given the option of an uncreative film can hide in a Burger King hedge, or an uncreative ammo can hide deep in the forest, I'll take the ammo can in the woods every time. If I have a choice on where to spend what little recreational time I have, it won't be in an exhaust laden, sweltering, SUV filled parking lot.

 

Well, I've seen plenty of creative film can hides far beyond what you describe...but I'm not in any way defending the use of film cans.

 

And I must say it is slightly disappointing to trudge half a mile down a scenic trail only to spot an ammo box laying out in the open next to a rotten stump.

For those who don't love the fascination which Nature brings to every showing, I suppose that might be true. Falling back on personal preference, if I make a half mile hike into the woods, I am quite simply delighted. If there happens to be an ammo can there, even better. I reckon if I were a city guy, who delighted in things like smog, traffic jams and endless concrete, a half mile hike in the woods might be a negative experience.

I could take you to a couple of places in the country that you would absolutely hate, active landfill, ODoT dumping grounds for roadkill, rural sewage treatment plants, sulfur springs (shall I continue?).

Of that I have no doubt! :lol:

Icky locations are not limited to the endless concrete of big cities. Though, to be fair, I have yet to see an active landfill, DOT carcass dumping ground or rural sewage treatment plant deep in a forest. I have found some homeless camps back in the woods. These were unpleasant, though a few CITO trips put everything back to rights. Not saying the places you cited couldn't be deep in the forest. I just haven't seen any. As to sulphur springs, I actually like them. I like all springs. I think it's way keel to see water bubbling up out of the ground. Many years ago my smarter half stumbled upon a web page listing GPS coordinates for all the natural springs which feed the St Johns River Water Management District. A few of these are known to the general public, such as Silver Springs in Ocala and Blue Springs in Orange City, but the vast majority require a lot of bush whacking to find. There are no public notifications pointing them out. I've hidden ammo cans at many of these. A couple have a strong sulphur odor.

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But I thought that those odd bits of wire sticking out of the ammo can made good camo, you know like vines and stuff. And I couldn't make it chirp like a cricket, so I put a clock inside it so that it would tick instead. And then I didn't want anyone who accidentally found it messing with it so I wrote "Danger this is a bomb do not touch" on it. That's ok, right?

Only if you hide it in a highly public spot. Any mechanical clock, with ticking loud enough to be heard from inside an ammo can, is gonna be a battery hog. If you hide this way out in the woods, where the numbers oriented cachers rarely roam, the batteries will die betwixt finds. Put it somewhere that the P&G crowd will appreciate, like under the steps of a courthouse, next to an active rail road track or under a highway overpass and you'll be fine.

I've been thinking about making a HUGE geocache and one of the local elementary schools gave me permission to hide one one their property. I'm think about taking an old van, the kind that is big enough to use as a camper, and parking it outside the school and hanging a sign that says "Free Candy". I really think the kids will appreciate it and it should get lot of favorite points.

Dude! That's an awesome idea!

You should paint the windows over so muggles can't see the cache inside...

 

And put a mattress inside so cachers can rest after they find it...

 

And then ask walking by kids to help you find your lost puppy! :rolleyes:

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Hope nobody bans Ammo cans and starts using... (gasp)... Pressure Cookers. :blink:

 

C'mon folks... we're here to have fun. Lighten up a little.

 

(And while I am fully aware that humor & sarcasm can be lost in some folks... I offer this disclaimer... Sorry If I Offended You. Was Just Making A Point The Best Way I Could.)

 

UC3B

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Dang, I guess I've been doing this backwards.

I should leave the can at home and just hide ammo!

That would be far less likely to be mistaken for terrorist activity.

I wouldn't be placing unfashionably green items all over the place, either.

Edited by sir dumil
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I could take you to a couple of places in the country that you would absolutely hate, active landfill, ODoT dumping grounds for roadkill, rural sewage treatment plants, sulfur springs (shall I continue?).

Of that I have no doubt! :lol:

Icky locations are not limited to the endless concrete of big cities. Though, to be fair, I have yet to see an active landfill, DOT carcass dumping ground or rural sewage treatment plant deep in a forest. I have found some homeless camps back in the woods. These were unpleasant, though a few CITO trips put everything back to rights. Not saying the places you cited couldn't be deep in the forest. I just haven't seen any. As to sulphur springs, I actually like them. I like all springs. I think it's way keel to see water bubbling up out of the ground. Many years ago my smarter half stumbled upon a web page listing GPS coordinates for all the natural springs which feed the St Johns River Water Management District. A few of these are known to the general public, such as Silver Springs in Ocala and Blue Springs in Orange City, but the vast majority require a lot of bush whacking to find. There are no public notifications pointing them out. I've hidden ammo cans at many of these. A couple have a strong sulphur odor.

Then there's this one, located in the deep woods. Stage two takes you to the world's first nuclear reactor radioactive dump site. And stage three takes you to where they actually buried the decommissioned reactors. A couple miles into some deep woods. It's actually a VERY cool multi and forest. laughing.gif

 

Not everyone likes a walk in the woods, or getting off trail. There's plenty of urban caches for those who don't. Good thing, too. Keeps 'em in the city so I can enjoy the peace and quiet in the woods. biggrin.gif

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It'id be perfectly fine if so many people weren't so over-proactive to the point of paranoia nowadays! I mean PUHLEEEEZZZZE....when you have kids being suspended from school for holding what appears to be (not even certain) a piece of notebook paper torn (not cut) in the shape of a handgun.....! (Don't laugh -it happened last year!)

If society (at least here) wasn't so paranoid and (re)learned what the phrases "good judgment" and "common sense" and "discretion" mean, no one would have to worry.

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Hope nobody bans Ammo cans and starts using... (gasp)... Pressure Cookers. :blink:

 

Actually, that's not a bad idea. They definitely seal tightly. The only drawback is that the seal can easily come loose.... then again, that hasn't stopped people from hiding matchstick holders with the same problem.

 

Until the Boston marathon bombings, I wouldn't have even thought a pressure cooker could be construed as any kind of weapon (except maybe for a housewife to knock their husband over the head with when they can't find their rolling pin or frying pan).

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Hope nobody bans Ammo cans and starts using... (gasp)... Pressure Cookers. :blink:

 

Actually, that's not a bad idea. They definitely seal tightly. The only drawback is that the seal can easily come loose.... then again, that hasn't stopped people from hiding matchstick holders with the same problem.

 

Until the Boston marathon bombings, I wouldn't have even thought a pressure cooker could be construed as any kind of weapon (except maybe for a housewife to knock their husband over the head with when they can't find their rolling pin or frying pan).

 

No knowing exacts or anything, I'd say a pressure cooker would make a better container for explosive than say light PVC pipe. Of course that's just the structural qualities. Better get back on topic- I'm sure how to make a bomb is frowned upon here...

 

But you may be on to something. I was out last week and ammo cans started at $25, for a 30 cal. I'm sure I can find a used pressure cooker for less than that. And it's only natural progression. Mint/candy tin containers. Pop bottle pre-forms. Lock and Locks. Now pressure cookers. Maybe next year it will be the fridge- that would make a great cache: it seals pretty decently, and there's no complicated way to open it.

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Ammo boxes can easily be mistaken as terrorist bombs, etc.

Maybe, but when I travel by plane why are they more concerned about the micro sized containers than about ammo boxes?

 

They can get rusty and cut your fingers up, and they smell funny sometimes, I think the smell might be toxic or something.

Yes, but this is great, an extra challenge so an extra half star for terrain and difficulty!

 

This one time a kid found an ammo box and decided to use ammo for other purposes, and this is no good! I also hear that sometimes potheads use ammoboxes to store their weed and that isn't good either because somebody might put weed in a geocache and then kids could also find that, which would be bad because the kids should be out finding regular geocaches, the good kind in tupperware, because those are nice.

Not too long ago I found weed in a tupperware cache, so I guess times have changed since the first time this post was posted on this forum :rolleyes: .

 

 

We don'd need stinky metal boxes stinking up the game, let's stick with tupperware, its what works and it doesn't leak at all.

 

Ban everything that leaks!

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