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Puzzle solved but not found


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I just got a message from a fellow geocacher in Ottawa. The person told me that she solved one of my puzzle caches but can't come out to Calgary to find it. As a result she informs me she is going to log my cache as "Found".

 

Personally I think this is bad form as the sport of geocaching is the find.

 

As I am still considered a "noob" to geocaching I would like some input on this matter.

Edited by Ogislookin
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I would most likely delete the log. Then I would email the person and invite them to log a 'note' on my cache, that they solved it but can't come find it.

That's what I do. If I'm cruising non local to me areas for puzzle ideas, I always log a solved note. I see no problems in that.

 

Brian

*GeoPunx*

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I just got a message from a fellow geocacher in Ottawa. The person told me that she solved one of my puzzle caches but can't come out to Calgary to find it. As a result she informs me she is going to log my cache as "Found".

 

Personally I think this is bad form as the sport of geocaching is the find.

 

As I am still considered a "noob" to geocaching I would like some input on this matter.

 

I'd delete the find in a heartbeat but would email them to let them know about the write note function especially if they are relatively new to the hobby as well.

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I sometimes write a note on a cache when I've solved the puzzle, but never "found" until I've actually found the cache. If someone logged "found" on my cache just because they solved the puzzle, I'd have to delete the log, or at least ask them to change it to a note.

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I just got a message from a fellow geocacher in Ottawa. The person told me that she solved one of my puzzle caches but can't come out to Calgary to find it. As a result she informs me she is going to log my cache as "Found".

 

Personally I think this is bad form as the sport of geocaching is the find.

 

As I am still considered a "noob" to geocaching I would like some input on this matter.

 

That's pretty nervy, as far as I'm concerned.

 

I bet it's someone with thousands of "finds" logged.

 

No sig in the logbook = not a find to be logged online.

 

I would do as the others suggested: delete the online "found it" log, email her to invite her to post a "write note" log about solving the puzzle.

 

 

B.

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I just got a message from a fellow geocacher in Ottawa. The person told me that she solved one of my puzzle caches but can't come out to Calgary to find it. As a result she informs me she is going to log my cache as "Found".

 

Personally I think this is bad form as the sport of geocaching is the find.

 

As I am still considered a "noob" to geocaching I would like some input on this matter.

 

Suggest she post a note if she likes, but under no circumstances should she log a Find. :blink:

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As I am still considered a "noob" to geocaching I would like some input on this matter.

Your reaction is correct: the idea is outrageous. It would be no different than logging a find on a traditional cache because she liked the description. I'm thinking it's the other cacher that's the newbie.

 

By the way, personally I find it kinda silly to post a note just because you solved a puzzle, but at least it's not vulgar.

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I bet it's someone with thousands of "finds" logged.

That was my first thought. It sounds like one of those entitled cachers that thinks they should be able to log a find on a missing cache because they spent a bunch of time looking. They've probably got a ton of questionable "finds".

 

@Ogislookin: You don't need to give us the cacher's name, but are they a new cacher with only a few finds, or a more "experienced" cacher with lots of finds? Just curious.

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By the way, personally I find it kinda silly to post a note just because you solved a puzzle

 

I've done this a number of times, usually with a new puzzle that came out and usually on a friend's puzzle, although not always. If the puzzle's old, there's really no point in it, but if the puzzle's new, I think the cache owner would be interested to know you solved it, even if you can't go get it right away.

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That's worse than dropping a container because they couldn't find it and claiming a find on the cache. I find that repulsive too. How can you claim a find on a cache that you placed? LOL

 

I too would inform the person that the log would be deleted if they don't sign the log. How dare her. You can accumulate a lot of caches by figuring out the puzzles and logging the caches. Only one rule to geocaching and that is find it and sign the log. Hope this person is a newbie and hasn't made a practice of this. However, its really not hurting anyone except them. As they didn't experience the find.

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I just got a message from a fellow geocacher in Ottawa. The person told me that she solved one of my puzzle caches but can't come out to Calgary to find it. As a result she informs me she is going to log my cache as "Found".

 

Personally I think this is bad form as the sport of geocaching is the find.

 

As I am still considered a "noob" to geocaching I would like some input on this matter.

One cacher who can't get to my cache (lives 800 miles away) and one cacher who can, each left a Note log when they solved it. That was very cool, especially since 16 of the 34 finders didn't even mention the puzzle. :ph34r:

 

But it's not a find until they find it.

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I just got a message from a fellow geocacher in Ottawa. The person told me that she solved one of my puzzle caches but can't come out to Calgary to find it. As a result she informs me she is going to log my cache as "Found".

 

Personally I think this is bad form as the sport of geocaching is the find.

 

As I am still considered a "noob" to geocaching I would like some input on this matter.

 

I'm not sure if the last 4 finders actually found it either. Right after you replaced it, the next day it was reported empty with 2 different visitors reportedly adding a log sheet. Sometimes when that happens people find litter and assume its a cache.

Edited by 4wheelin_fool
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By the way, personally I find it kinda silly to post a note just because you solved a puzzle, but at least it's not vulgar.

 

We worked our way through a series of puzzles that got progressively more difficult. For the one we felt that we had truly conquered with a lot of effort, we posted a note thanking the CO for exercising our brains that way. We still haven't gotten around to finding the physical caches because we want to make a full day of it, but we were just so thrilled when the geochecker came back "Success!" that we had to share it! :D

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By the way, personally I find it kinda silly to post a note just because you solved a puzzle, but at least it's not vulgar.

 

We worked our way through a series of puzzles that got progressively more difficult. For the one we felt that we had truly conquered with a lot of effort, we posted a note thanking the CO for exercising our brains that way. We still haven't gotten around to finding the physical caches because we want to make a full day of it, but we were just so thrilled when the geochecker came back "Success!" that we had to share it! :D

 

I like to post solved notes - especially on newly published puzzles - and can think of a number of good reasons for doing so.

 

1. Puzzle setters make mistakes sometimes - a solved note lets them know that their puzzle works as intended - or not as the case may be - in which case the error can be identified and fixed for the benefit of all

 

2. It lets the wider community know that the puzzle is solvable too so those who might have given up or incorrectly branded the puzzle as impossible can look again - if they like

 

3. It's a fun little side game to see who solved it first

 

4. Puzzle caches get found less often - solved notes let the CO know there is still interest in their puzzle

 

5. People who enjoy puzzles often solve puzzles they will never find, because they are too far away - but it's nice to let the CO know that their puzzle has drawn interest from afar, and that a person has solved and enjoyed it - even if they will never find the cache.

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By the way, personally I find it kinda silly to post a note just because you solved a puzzle, but at least it's not vulgar.

 

We worked our way through a series of puzzles that got progressively more difficult. For the one we felt that we had truly conquered with a lot of effort, we posted a note thanking the CO for exercising our brains that way. We still haven't gotten around to finding the physical caches because we want to make a full day of it, but we were just so thrilled when the geochecker came back "Success!" that we had to share it! :D

 

I've done the same for a 5 star difficulty puzzle that took over a month to solve. Since the cache is 700 miles from home I may never get a chance to find the container but the note seemed like the proper way to thank the cache owner for creating an elaborate and very enjoyable puzzle. I wouldn't, however, post a solved it note on a sudoku puzzle cache.

 

 

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I like to post solved notes - especially on newly published puzzles - and can think of a number of good reasons for doing so.

I guess we've strayed off topic, but I'd like to discuss this more. First of all, I agree that solving a puzzle might be one of many reasons for posting a note. But I don't think the general practice of posting a note for every cache you solve is reasonable. I guess that's mainly because I've solved hundreds of puzzles that I haven't found yet, many of them in places I will never visit. And I think my numbers are probably pretty low among puzzle aficionados. Don't get me wrong, though: I don't find a posted solve note offensive or anything, it just tells me that the person probably doesn't solve many puzzles...or doesn't find many caches. But let's discuss specifics:

 

1. Puzzle setters make mistakes sometimes - a solved note lets them know that their puzzle works as intended - or not as the case may be - in which case the error can be identified and fixed for the benefit of all

If your concern is really that the CO is worried it won't be solved, then you can send the CO a private message. You post a note because you want everyone else to know you've solved it, so this argument is really more of a rationalization.

 

2. It lets the wider community know that the puzzle is solvable too so those who might have given up or incorrectly branded the puzzle as impossible can look again - if they like

Apparently you cache in an area with different standards. The puzzles in my area are typically solved and found within a day. If it takes longer to be found, then someone will tend to post a note saying they've solved it. Problems are normally sorted out behind the scenes, although sometimes in these cases of delayed satisfaction, someone will post a note about it. But if everyone that solved a puzzle but wasn't going to look for it anytime soon posted a note, there'd typically be 30 notes posted before the first find later that same day.

 

3. It's a fun little side game to see who solved it first

I have to admit, most puzzles in my area use Certitude, which nullifies most of these arguments, particularly this one. But without Certitude, this declaration only works if there's a widespread local standard. Since most puzzle solvers I know don't post such claims, around here claiming to be the first to solve in a log would be laughable in most cases.

 

4. Puzzle caches get found less often - solved notes let the CO know there is still interest in their puzzle

Yeah, this reason makes sense, particularly if there's been little recent activity. Personally, I like to surprise the CO by actually finding it, but I can imagine cases where I'd want to post a note about it if I was planning to seek it at some finite point in the future. I'd be more likely to send a private note to the CO, though.

 

5. People who enjoy puzzles often solve puzzles they will never find, because they are too far away - but it's nice to let the CO know that their puzzle has drawn interest from afar, and that a person has solved and enjoyed it - even if they will never find the cache.

This is probably the practice I'm most interested in discouraging. Again, I'm not actually objecting to it, I'm just saying it strikes me as silly when it happens to a cache in my area. I solve puzzles all over the place, and I bet lots of other people do, too. If you want to thank a CO for a fun puzzle, you can do that privately. If the puzzle is really fabulous, and you don't think its quality it obvious from the other logs, then perhaps it would make sense to glow about it in a note. But most of the ones I see strike me more as people glowing about their own wonderful puzzle solving skills...and typically on puzzles that weren't all that difficult.

 

I've done the same for a 5 star difficulty puzzle that took over a month to solve. Since the cache is 700 miles from home I may never get a chance to find the container but the note seemed like the proper way to thank the cache owner for creating an elaborate and very enjoyable puzzle. I wouldn't, however, post a solved it note on a sudoku puzzle cache.

This is the kind of thinking I'm suggesting. If there's a good reason, a note is perfectly reasonable. I just assume someone's solving any given puzzle regularly, so posting a note just because is something like posting a note saying, "I just read your traditional cache's description. Wish I lived there!" (Which, of course, could also be reasonable in some very special case.)

Edited by dprovan
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I like to post solved notes - especially on newly published puzzles - and can think of a number of good reasons for doing so.

Don't get me wrong, though: I don't find a posted solve note offensive or anything, it just tells me that the person probably doesn't solve many puzzles...or doesn't find many caches.

 

I can't see how note posting, in and of itself, tells you how many puzzles a person might solve or how many caches they might find.

 

1. Puzzle setters make mistakes sometimes - a solved note lets them know that their puzzle works as intended - or not as the case may be - in which case the error can be identified and fixed for the benefit of all

If your concern is really that the CO is worried it won't be solved, then you can send the CO a private message. You post a note because you want everyone else to know you've solved it, so this argument is really more of a rationalization.

 

A private message to the CO wouldn't convey to others that the puzzle was solvable or otherwise. In fairness though, if I found what I believed to be an error / omission / ambiguity or something I was uncertain of, I wouldn't post a note - I would contact the CO directly to give them the opportunity to take a look at things to see if anything needed fixing/changing or, as is entirely possible - let me know that I'm talking a load of twaddle :D

 

2. It lets the wider community know that the puzzle is solvable too so those who might have given up or incorrectly branded the puzzle as impossible can look again - if they like

Apparently you cache in an area with different standards. The puzzles in my area are typically solved and found within a day. If it takes longer to be found, then someone will tend to post a note saying they've solved it. Problems are normally sorted out behind the scenes, although sometimes in these cases of delayed satisfaction, someone will post a note about it. But if everyone that solved a puzzle but wasn't going to look for it anytime soon posted a note, there'd typically be 30 notes posted before the first find later that same day.

 

There are puzzles around here that are solved and found within a day. There are others which take weeks or months, some which take years and others which have never been solved.

 

I agree that problems are best solved behind the scenes - provided nobody is wasting time trying to solve a flawed puzzle. Generally if the CO needs to fix / change anything I would though expect them to post a note to that effect to the cache page.

 

3. It's a fun little side game to see who solved it first

I have to admit, most puzzles in my area use Certitude, which nullifies most of these arguments, particularly this one. But without Certitude, this declaration only works if there's a widespread local standard. Since most puzzle solvers I know don't post such claims, around here claiming to be the first to solve in a log would be laughable in most cases.

 

Use of Certitude might nullify some or even all of my arguments in your area. In my area Certitude is a rarity. Laughable? Maybe - I certainly laugh quite often when having fun :lol:

 

4. Puzzle caches get found less often - solved notes let the CO know there is still interest in their puzzle

Yeah, this reason makes sense, particularly if there's been little recent activity. Personally, I like to surprise the CO by actually finding it, but I can imagine cases where I'd want to post a note about it if I was planning to seek it at some finite point in the future. I'd be more likely to send a private note to the CO, though.

 

I can see the value / fun in surprising the CO by finding the cache, especially if it's not been found for a while - always nice to know people are still enjoying it and it's worth maintaining it.

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The forum rejected the number of embedded quotes in my post - so here's the rest - you'll have to forgive my clumsy use of the available tools :rolleyes:

 

5. People who enjoy puzzles often solve puzzles they will never find, because they are too far away - but it's nice to let the CO know that their puzzle has drawn interest from afar, and that a person has solved and enjoyed it - even if they will never find the cache.

This is probably the practice I'm most interested in discouraging. Again, I'm not actually objecting to it, I'm just saying it strikes me as silly when it happens to a cache in my area. I solve puzzles all over the place, and I bet lots of other people do, too. If you want to thank a CO for a fun puzzle, you can do that privately. If the puzzle is really fabulous, and you don't think its quality it obvious from the other logs, then perhaps it would make sense to glow about it in a note. But most of the ones I see strike me more as people glowing about their own wonderful puzzle solving skills...and typically on puzzles that weren't all that difficult.

 

I'm struggling to understand why a person would invest energy in discouraging a practice they didn't object to? As we're indicating what we find silly or laughable then for me this would be one of those things, as in this practice doesn't really bother me one way or another - but I'm thinking of discouraging people from engaging in it anyway :blink:

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Apparently you cache in an area with different standards. The puzzles in my area are typically solved and found within a day. If it takes longer to be found, then someone will tend to post a note saying they've solved it. Problems are normally sorted out behind the scenes, although sometimes in these cases of delayed satisfaction, someone will post a note about it. But if everyone that solved a puzzle but wasn't going to look for it anytime soon posted a note, there'd typically be 30 notes posted before the first find later that same day.

 

 

And that's the thing. The reason why a practice like posting solved it notes on puzzle caches doesn't work everywhere is because there's a significant disparity in the the cache environments around the world.

 

I took a look at the 10 closest puzzle caches in my area that I haven't found, with a few that were over a year old, and only one of them had more than 30 logs total posted on it. I doubt that there are more than 20 active geocachers within 20 miles of here. There are probably some areas where there are 200 cachers within a 20 mile radius, and a lot of places there there are only 2 (or fewer).

 

There is no right or wrong answer to "is it okay to post a solved it note on a puzzle cache" because the areas where puzzle caches can be found are not the same.

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I think we pretty much all agree that logging "found" when you just solved the puzzle is not right. Whether to log a note or not isn't really the topic of this thread, though it does make for an interesting discussion.

 

Has the note not become part of the discussion because so many posters have suggested it as an acceptable or even preferred course of action?

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I can't see how note posting, in and of itself, tells you how many puzzles a person might solve or how many caches they might find.

OK, let me explain, then. First of all, I said "tells me", but what I really meant was "makes me suspect". The reason it makes me suspect they don't solve many puzzles is that someone that solves lots of puzzles would think that lots of other people probably solve lots of puzzles, too, and realize that if they all posted notes every time they solve a puzzle, those notes wouldn't be that interesting and would clog up the logs. Or, otherwise, they solve lots of puzzles, but don't find many caches, so they feel a need to post notes as ersatz finds.

 

There are puzzles around here that are solved and found within a day. There are others which take weeks or months, some which take years and others which have never been solved.

Yeah, it's different. Around here, if a cache isn't not merely solved but also found within a couple days, it's unusual, no matter how hard the puzzle is. And I suppose that's part of the point: if you just routine post "I solved it logs", you might want to consider that the culture might be different where you're posting to. Specifically, I'm pointing out that in the San Francisco Bay Area, just about everyone will be thinking, "So what?", even as many are simultaneously thinking and saying, "Good job!"

 

Generally if the CO needs to fix / change anything I would though expect them to post a note to that effect to the cache page.

Yes, certainly if there's a problem of this type, that would be a very good reason to post a note.

 

I'm struggling to understand why a person would invest energy in discouraging a practice they didn't object to?

OK, that's a reasonable question. I don't object to them because it doesn't matter to me. I discourage them because they're embarrassing.

 

And that's the thing. The reason why a practice like posting solved it notes on puzzle caches doesn't work everywhere is because there's a significant disparity in the the cache environments around the world.

I think you're right. I don't think I understood how unusual my area was in this regard before we had this conversation.

 

I took a look at the 10 closest puzzle caches in my area that I haven't found, with a few that were over a year old, and only one of them had more than 30 logs total posted on it. I doubt that there are more than 20 active geocachers within 20 miles of here. There are probably some areas where there are 200 cachers within a 20 mile radius, and a lot of places there there are only 2 (or fewer).

I think there might be 200 cachers that regularly solve puzzles within 20 -- well, 30 -- miles of me, and probably thousands of active cachers overall. Definitely a different world. How cool is that?

 

I think we pretty much all agree that logging "found" when you just solved the puzzle is not right. Whether to log a note or not isn't really the topic of this thread, though it does make for an interesting discussion.

Has the note not become part of the discussion because so many posters have suggested it as an acceptable or even preferred course of action?

Kinda, but I think it's more that we all agreed on the original question, so we -- well, frankly, I think it's all my fault -- expanded the conversation to cover this related topic.

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As I am still considered a "noob" to geocaching I would like some input on this matter.

Your reaction is correct: the idea is outrageous. It would be no different than logging a find on a traditional cache because she liked the description. I'm thinking it's the other cacher that's the newbie.

 

By the way, personally I find it kinda silly to post a note just because you solved a puzzle, but at least it's not vulgar.

 

-- Definitely not a 'find' but i have posted 'solved' logs . with comments..and to be found later ..at least CO's know their puzzles

are getting action - i dont see any issue with that. then others can see its solvable ..

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I can't see how note posting, in and of itself, tells you how many puzzles a person might solve or how many caches they might find.

OK, let me explain, then. First of all, I said "tells me", but what I really meant was "makes me suspect". The reason it makes me suspect they don't solve many puzzles is that someone that solves lots of puzzles would think that lots of other people probably solve lots of puzzles, too, and realize that if they all posted notes every time they solve a puzzle, those notes wouldn't be that interesting and would clog up the logs. Or, otherwise, they solve lots of puzzles, but don't find many caches, so they feel a need to post notes as ersatz finds.

 

I think you're right about one thing - the notes themselves aren't that interesting - but they can be informative and certainly not harmful - a least not to a degree that's worth campaigning against them or people's right to post them if they like - IMHO :)

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You know what would be cool? A log type of "solved" that would would not affect you find count. You could armchair solve puzzles all over the world and boost your "solved" count, while not going anywhere at all. I know it would be popular.

It would also be great so that the ones you've already cracked are easy to identify, to include in your PQs & such... Also, is there a way to include personal cache notes in our PQs? So many puzzles have detailed hints included in the geochecker, which I copy to the cache notes. But often, I don't get to hunt a solved puzzle immediately & only look for it when I happen to be in the area & can't remember the hint from Geochecker.

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I just got a message from a fellow geocacher in Ottawa. The person told me that she solved one of my puzzle caches but can't come out to Calgary to find it. As a result she informs me she is going to log my cache as "Found".

 

Personally I think this is bad form as the sport of geocaching is the find.

 

As I am still considered a "noob" to geocaching I would like some input on this matter.

 

Solving the puzzle is NOT finding the cache..... it's solving the puzzle ... no smiley for that!

Delete the log, or ask them to.

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I distinctly remember a Groundspeak rule stating that all that was needed to log a find was to sign the logbook. So no sig, no log. Of course you get the occasional ones where a pen is forgotten and a photo is taken instead.

 

I've worked out several puzzles but haven't even thought of logging them. Heck, I solved one, forgot the answer and now can't solve the darned thing. It happens!

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Of course logging a find just because you've solved the puzzle is bogus. It's not a find. You should delete the log. However, you can also discourage this behavior, thus taking the onus off yourself for being the "bad guy", by putting a coordinates checker on the cache page. Certitudes and geochecker are two options for that. Certitudes has the advantage of (or disadvantage according to some) of listing the solvers' geocaching names so that anyone can see who solved it and in what order. The person in this case who wants to claim a find may be satisfied with getting the recognition there without having to log the find, or at least may not take it quite so bad if her log is deleted as long as she can see her name up on the certitudes log.

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Certitudes has the advantage of (or disadvantage according to some) of listing the solvers' geocaching names so that anyone can see who solved it and in what order.

 

This is excellent, although it doesn't really prove people solved it. They can just easily enter the coordinates their friend gave them.

Edited by The_Incredibles_
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I can't see how note posting, in and of itself, tells you how many puzzles a person might solve or how many caches they might find.

OK, let me explain, then. First of all, I said "tells me", but what I really meant was "makes me suspect". The reason it makes me suspect they don't solve many puzzles is that someone that solves lots of puzzles would think that lots of other people probably solve lots of puzzles, too, and realize that if they all posted notes every time they solve a puzzle, those notes wouldn't be that interesting and would clog up the logs. Or, otherwise, they solve lots of puzzles, but don't find many caches, so they feel a need to post notes as ersatz finds.

 

I think you're right about one thing - the notes themselves aren't that interesting - but they can be informative and certainly not harmful - a least not to a degree that's worth campaigning against them or people's right to post them if they like - IMHO :)

 

Disagree. Just got eight notes that someone has solved some of my mystery caches. That's just clutter on the cache page. Cachers who download five logs now have this clutter on the cache page. Four 'found it' which might provide some useful information. And "Hey. I solved the puzzle. Whoopee for me!" Boring, useless clutter.

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Personally, I wouldn't delete the log. Is it bad form to log a find simply because you solved a puzzle? Of course it is. Whilst Groundspeak does not have an absolute requirement that the log be signed in order to claim a find, it's still pretty much a given that log signing is a fundamental part of this hobby. Would you be we'll within your rights to delete it? Again, of course. The poster's only recourse would be to ask Groundspeak to restore their log, and I doubt they would do so if the person admitted hat they never visited ground zero.

 

But for me, it's not worth burning bridges over.

 

Anyone who reads the log will know that the poster didn't find the cache.

 

That's good enough for me.

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Certitudes has the advantage of (or disadvantage according to some) of listing the solvers' geocaching names so that anyone can see who solved it and in what order.

 

This is excellent, although it doesn't really prove people solved it. They can just easily enter the coordinates their friend gave them.

They can get the coords from their friend, find the cache, and log "found" on it, too. There is no way to prove someone actually went to the work of solving a puzzle.

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Certitudes has the advantage of (or disadvantage according to some) of listing the solvers' geocaching names so that anyone can see who solved it and in what order.

Certitude also has the option for the solver of remaining anonymous, if it bothers someone to have their name on the page.

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But for me, it's not worth burning bridges over.

 

Anyone who reads the log will know that the poster didn't find the cache.

 

 

I've not yet had an issue where I've had to consider deleting a log. And I am one who doesn't want to burn bridges. But in this case, if the log makes it clear that the person actually didn't find the cache (they didn't even look for it), that would motivate me to want to delete it. Otherwise it looks like I am allowing arm chair logging on my cache, and not doing my job as a cache owner to delete "bogus" logs.

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But for me, it's not worth burning bridges over.

 

Anyone who reads the log will know that the poster didn't find the cache.

 

 

I've not yet had an issue where I've had to consider deleting a log. And I am one who doesn't want to burn bridges. But in this case, if the log makes it clear that the person actually didn't find the cache (they didn't even look for it), that would motivate me to want to delete it. Otherwise it looks like I am allowing arm chair logging on my cache, and not doing my job as a cache owner to delete "bogus" logs.

I think you would be perfectly within your rights as a cache owner to delete the find. I'm just describing what my response would be. I find the term 'bogus', as used in the guidelines to be a bit too subjective for my liking. Whilst I have horribly rigid standards which I apply to myself regarding logging, (no signature = no smiley), when it comes to folks logging caches on my hides, my standards are utterly contradictory. If BillyBobNosePicker does something, which he feels equates to a find, I don't view there efforts as bogus, regardless of what the totality of those efforts might be.

 

Just how I feel. :unsure:

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If BillyBobNosePicker does something, which he feels equates to a find, I don't view there efforts as bogus, regardless of what the totality of those efforts might be.

Does this extend to a pure armchair find of a traditional cache? Or would Mr. Picker have crossed some line somewhere in that case?

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If BillyBobNosePicker does something, which he feels equates to a find, I don't view there efforts as bogus, regardless of what the totality of those efforts might be.

Does this extend to a pure armchair find of a traditional cache? Or would Mr. Picker have crossed some line somewhere in that case?

 

That's what bothers me - it would look like I'm allowing an armchair find; which Groundspeak frowns upon. My interpretation of the guidelines tells me I should delete the log.

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If BillyBobNosePicker does something, which he feels equates to a find, I don't view there efforts as bogus, regardless of what the totality of those efforts might be.

Does this extend to a pure armchair find of a traditional cache? Or would Mr. Picker have crossed some line somewhere in that case?

 

That's what bothers me - it would look like I'm allowing an armchair find; which Groundspeak frowns upon. My interpretation of the guidelines tells me I should delete the log.

 

Yeah...I lean towards first asking them to change it to a note instead of a find, but deleting it if they don't respond within a certain amount of time. You can't control whether a person solves a puzzle himself (or herself), but you CAN control whether they claim actually finding the cache. Remember, it's a "Puzzle Cache"...cache being the operative word here. If you just want to post puzzles for people to solve, create a puzzle blog or something. This is still geocaching and while the guidelines aren't really enforced, they do exist to help define the game/hobby/pastime/activity.

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If BillyBobNosePicker does something, which he feels equates to a find, I don't view there efforts as bogus, regardless of what the totality of those efforts might be.

Does this extend to a pure armchair find of a traditional cache?

I'm not sure. I've never experienced an armchair log on any of my caches, either traditional or otherwise.

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