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4.5lb Walleye GCDFB


Stormgren-X
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Man, this is so awesome! I've read every comment in this thread and watched the SPOT diligently along your journey. This is exciting stuff for the world of Geocaching. Congratulations on such an amazing journey. Can't wait to hear and see more of it. I shared this story with our local caching club of over 100 and there are many others who have been pulling for you. Great job!

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Congrats! One small cache for a pair of cachers, one epic smilie for geocaching-kind!!! Great to see the video after watching your spot beacon zig zag all over GZ on Saturday. Neat to finally see what it was like. I look forward to reading more about your adventure. Thanks for bringing us all along for the journey!!

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Well Kougarok is officially the cache that has gone the longest unfound.

 

 

There is going to some drama about this one. Someone just posted a N/A log

 

Yeah, I saw that. I hope that they are in alone in that feeling. There isn't a real reason why someone can't get the same satisfaction out of that cache as they did with this one!

That cache would be archived if it was placed in the last few years. The CO is history and its a throwdown cache. I am willing to bet its MIA again. It just take longer for caches to get archived in situations like this. Archived it and move on. This is one of the reason GS doesn't allow vacation caches anymore.

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Well Kougarok is officially the cache that has gone the longest unfound.

There is going to some drama about this one. Someone just posted a N/A log

:rolleyes:

However, since RyAk DNF'd and hid a replacement cache, I do not believe this should still qualify as a pure unfound cache.

Agreed, but what does being unfound or not have to do with an archive request? The above line being used in the context of an NA log seems to imply that once a cache is found, it should be archived.

 

From the pics showing a simple GZ with limited hiding spot options, we should all be willing to agree that if RyAk and friends spent an hour "scouring", the container is most certainly not there.

I agree that the original container is most likely missing, however, as noted earlier in the NA, RyAk left a replacement, so there is a container there now (or at least there was in June 2008).

 

I believe this cache should be archived until such time that a visit produces the original micro.

This sounds like a complete misunderstanding of what the term "archive" means on this site. Archival is not a temporary measure.

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Stormgren-X, all I can say is CONGRATULATIONS on a epic adventure and Find. You had us literally on the edge of our seats waiting for each SPOT update, especially once you came ashore and near ground zero. I can't wait for the full report.

 

Let's keep this thread about "Stormgren-X vs. the Walleye" and debate the other cache(s) on a different thread.

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A quick look at the gallery for that Kougarok shows that there are options to walking in.

 

'kougarok rock again' photo shows that RyAk managed to FLY in, that is a helicopter shadow, plus the helmets in other photos. There is a quad track (which may not be open to public quad use now). So it is possible to get there and look.

 

I'm willing to bet the helo was on business of some kind and it was on a break, thus time limited. There could still be the original there. Even the replacement. Still people have used such landmarks for caches (not geocaches) for a very long time. It would be normal for a visitor there to look for something left behind. I don't think Geocachers are the first to do that just for fun.

 

People have asked how it got published, but in 2001 things like that were allowed and grandfathered, I don't know what 'rules' were in place exactly since I started in 08, but I know things have changed. 4.5 was sort of similar in that it was placed under those rules, and there was no real reason to shut it down on spec... although the CO is still around. At worst someone should ask RyAk (or someone else) to recreate it under a new number IF they want to post a maintenance plan. It seems like a great location for a cache (or Earthcache?).

 

Anyway I can't see a waiting list of people wanting the location, or threat of building a new mall either.

So what is it hurting other than maybe violating current guidelines which did not apply back then.

Perhaps what is needed is to for people to make 'attempts' to find these more often, rather than settle for lampskirts at Wally World. I don't get out that much, or that far away, but always have some lesser adventure when I can, often for lonely caches. It is what I can attempt, and I do. Found a lot of them and now look after a couple for the owners... not much, but a few are worth the effort to keep going, others not so much.

 

We all need to chip in somehow to raise the bar a wee bit.

 

edit: "Let's keep this thread about "Stormgren-X vs. the Walleye" and debate the other cache(s) on a different thread." This came almost at the same time, and I agree with the thought... new debate about 'oldest cache'.

 

Doug 7rxc

Edited by 7rxc
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I've been looking at the Conch Shell Horn cache (placed 7/2001) and the feasibility of going after it. As far as I can tell, one could a non-stop flight from NYC to Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago (I actually know someone that lives there), a puddle jumper to Margarita Island (or a combination of ferry/bus/ferry) then there is at least one sailboat charter company that does a tour to the islands where the cache is located. If there was some interest in sharing the cost of the sailboat charter from a few people I think I could get there for not much more than it would cost me to go to Seattle for the blockparty and associated events.

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Stormgren-X - Thank you for taking us virtually along on your incredible journey so we didn't have to endure the bugs :lol: It has been great to watch your SPOT progress and see the video. We can't wait to read the whole story and see photos of the trek!

 

And may I add: This thread has been the most positive, supportive, community-building discussion I have seen since I started three years ago. I hope other cachers who have grand adventures planned will share in a similar way and inspire the rest of us to expand our caching horizons. :D

 

Having said that, it's a lovely day today. Time to get outside and cache!

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Tomorrow the biggest challenge will be to properly navigate the delta as they work their way into Fort Albany. But I'm confident that they'll figure it out.

...

 

I'll plead ignorance here. Can someone give a quick explaination why navigatint the delta should be so hard ? The blog of the trip in 1983 (1984?) mentioned that they were concerned but they only had paper maps to guide them. Not a fancy gps like these guys do.

 

The water "fans out" in the delta into numerous streams. There can be odd currents, shallow spots, and other unpredictable issues. Navigation charts are rarely completely up to date. Some of these issues, like shallow spots, are less of an issue for canoes, since they have a shallow draft. However, Stormgren-X does not want to choose the wrong passage, get stuck on a sandbar, and have to resort to portage or paddling upstream.

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Stormgren-X you are an animal. When it comes to FTF hounds/captains of adventure, you are the leader of the pack. I appreciate the way you took this adventure on and congratulations on your find. Truly an epic tale that is worthy of accolades. Well done!

Yes, and he knows it's all about the trip, not just the destination. If numbers mattered most, he could have visited 500 lamppost caches during those two weeks!

:laughing:

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People have asked how it got published, but in 2001 things like that were allowed and grandfathered, I don't know what 'rules' were in place exactly since I started in 08, but I know things have changed. 4.5 was sort of similar in that it was placed under those rules, and there was no real reason to shut it down on spec... although the CO is still around. At worst someone should ask RyAk (or someone else) to recreate it under a new number IF they want to post a maintenance plan. It seems like a great location for a cache (or Earthcache?).

 

 

The CO of "4.5" had a clear maintenance plan from day one. It went as follows:

 

(1) Choose a fairly good container (could have been better, of course, but he's dealing with that in two weeks);

(2) Place it in a protected spot, away from the full brunt of the sun and the weather; and

(3) Place it in an area where careless cachers would not disturb it.

 

Viable plan? It sure is, and we have the photos to prove it!

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A quick look at the gallery for that Kougarok shows that there are options to walking in.

 

'kougarok rock again' photo shows that RyAk managed to FLY in, that is a helicopter shadow, plus the helmets in other photos. There is a quad track (which may not be open to public quad use now). So it is possible to get there and look.

 

I'm willing to bet the helo was on business of some kind and it was on a break, thus time limited. There could still be the original there. Even the replacement.

 

Just a quick comment before we get back on topic. It's obvious what happened to the micro - the helicopter's prop-wash blew it away! That's some powerful wind!

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Stormgren-X you are an animal. When it comes to FTF hounds/captains of adventure, you are the leader of the pack. I appreciate the way you took this adventure on and congratulations on your find. Truly an epic tale that is worthy of accolades. Well done!

Yes, and he knows it's all about the trip, not just the destination. If numbers mattered most, he could have visited 500 lamppost caches during those two weeks!

:laughing:

 

wmpastor, indeed it was about the trip, you nailed it with your comment. This was no simple undertaking, done on a lark. You can bet the trip was planned meticulously, including where to stay in Ft Albany and how to get out. The SPOT wasn't brought just for our benefit, but now that the tech exists it is pretty much necessary on a trip like this; even with the SPOT it may take a day or more to get to you if you run into trouble. Think about this: if you drive from civilization, the closest you can get to the cache is where they put their canoes in. Fort Albany has roads and cars and trucks, but you can't drive there from here. And as for lamp-posts, I'll bet that they didn't even pass 500 lamp-posts from Sudbury to Hearst!! There is a reason for that - this is harsh country, with blackflies and mosquitoes the size of sparrows. I was born in the area almost fifty years ago (my parents met in Moosonee, you can't drive there either) and I had an opportunity to do some caching up there last spring. Nothing like this AT ALL. I felt at times like there wasn't another human within 100 miles, but it does not even compare to this trip, not even close, not even CLOSE, NOT EVEN CLOSE.

 

I have seen accounts of this canoe route over the years and I've considered them romantic but *impossible* for casual adventurers like us. I would have followed a trip like this without the cache just because it is amazing on its own; the fact that the cache was en route makes it more special.

 

And here's a final observation. I noticed the cache container and the logbook in the video, yeah, yeah, both in pretty good condition. Yesterday, we found a cache in a park in Toronto that was placed in July, 2001. There were more people within 2 sq mi of this cache than there were within 500 sq mi of 4.5 lb Walleye I am sure. It has been found by well over 300 cachers since it was placed, and the original container and logbook remain. I was struck by the logbook itself (same type of notepad), with a huge announcement on the cover that the cache was placed on such-and-such a date by such-and-such a cacher and a lot of other blah blah blah. Just like all the other *old* caches that we've found with original logbooks. You don't see that stuff anymore, at least not with the caches that we find.

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People have asked how it got published, but in 2001 things like that were allowed and grandfathered, I don't know what 'rules' were in place exactly since I started in 08, but I know things have changed. 4.5 was sort of similar in that it was placed under those rules, and there was no real reason to shut it down on spec... although the CO is still around. At worst someone should ask RyAk (or someone else) to recreate it under a new number IF they want to post a maintenance plan. It seems like a great location for a cache (or Earthcache?).

 

 

The CO of "4.5" had a clear maintenance plan from day one. It went as follows:

 

(1) Choose a fairly good container (could have been better, of course, but he's dealing with that in two weeks);

(2) Place it in a protected spot, away from the full brunt of the sun and the weather; and

(3) Place it in an area where careless cachers would not disturb it.

 

Viable plan? It sure is, and we have the photos to prove it!

 

Yes in the case of "4.5", the Alaska one didn't apparently, but the rules were different then and things were allowed that are not now. That ends the Kougarok comments since there now exist two discussions on that.

 

As for the track after Ft. Albany... most people would fly to Moosonee and then PBxpress to the southlands.

They probably picked up their vehicle (or were picked up) at the station. We did that on the Missinaibi trip in the 70's but the train name was different I think then. Just a freight/passenger combo. I was looking at one of those links earlier and found one that was an air service and R/T from Ft. Albany to Timmins was 900 plus each. Not counting a canoe. The original blog quoted also flew to Moosonee then trained southward.

 

Doug 7rxc

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Congrats Stormgren-X!!

 

The greatest thing about this find is that unlike the previous oldest FTFs, there is no drama, no arguments that it was or wasn't original, no asking hotel owners for a box they had been asked to hang onto etc. Just a nice tidy (difficult)FTF.

 

Way to go!

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Congrats Stormgren-X!!

 

The greatest thing about this find is that unlike the previous oldest FTFs, there is no drama, no arguments that it was or wasn't original, no asking hotel owners for a box they had been asked to hang onto etc. Just a nice tidy (difficult)FTF.

 

Way to go!

 

+1

.

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Congrats Stormgren-X!! What an adventure!

 

I've loved following it. I've also been fascinated as to how remote the location is. I learned new concepts like "winter roads". I'd love to do the trip.

From my understanding, it's impossible to drive anywhere close from points south. You can arrive by boat using the Albany River or Hudson Bay. A seaplane ($$$) could get you within a short walk to GZ. A powerboat from Fort Albany might take a day - but you need to find a spot to buy or rent a boat. Going in winter? Read Jack London's "To Build a Fire" first. Going in summer? Get Deet, Permethrin & mosquito netting. GL - and please use tracking so we can follow your adventure!

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From my understanding, it's impossible to drive anywhere close from points south. You can arrive by boat using the Albany River or Hudson Bay. A seaplane ($$$) could get you within a short walk to GZ. A powerboat from Fort Albany might take a day - but you need to find a spot to buy or rent a boat. Going in winter? Read Jack London's "To Build a Fire" first. Going in summer? Get Deet, Permethrin & mosquito netting. GL - and please use tracking so we can follow your adventure!

Sorry to get OT Stormgren-X.

Have seen this in a number of posts...

How does a book of fiction published in 1908 have any bearing on how we'd "trek the wilds" today?

Sure it was a good read, like Call of the Wild, but that's about it.

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From my understanding, it's impossible to drive anywhere close from points south. You can arrive by boat using the Albany River or Hudson Bay. A seaplane ($$$) could get you within a short walk to GZ. A powerboat from Fort Albany might take a day - but you need to find a spot to buy or rent a boat. Going in winter? Read Jack London's "To Build a Fire" first. Going in summer? Get Deet, Permethrin & mosquito netting. GL - and please use tracking so we can follow your adventure!

Sorry to get OT Stormgren-X.

Have seen this in a number of posts...

How does a book of fiction published in 1908 have any bearing on how we'd "trek the wilds" today?

Sure it was a good read, like Call of the Wild, but that's about it.

 

Here's why. Without spoiling what you acknowledge is "a good read," the short story deals with the preparation -- mental, equipment-wise, fitness-wise and knowledge-wise -- of undertaking a risky outdoor activity (hiking in Alaska in winter, in that case). A careful read shows the main character falls short in many ways - starting in about the second paragraph, when he is out of breath after climbing a small embankment (i.e., he's not in good enough physical condition to hike many miles through the snow at -75F, if he even grasped what -75F really means, which he doesn't).

 

Equipment is far, far better now, 100 years later -- we don't use wool socks in the most extreme conditions, for example. But the mental side is exactly the same, including the risk of overestimating one's own knowledge and ability. Many people who followed the "4.5 Walleye" saga have the package of skills to do a similar trek. Others, myself included, know we'd have to do some serious prep before tackling something like that. Stormgren-X was thoroughly prepared, and like any pro, he "made it look easy." My fear is for those who "don't know what they don't know" -- someone could undertake an adventure that looks easy, and be "in over their head" in a dangerous way. It's happened before! I heard some over-exuberant talk of tackling either the Canadian cache or the Alaskan cache, seemingly without regard to fundamental issues like time of year.

 

So, I recommended the Jack London story both because it's a fine story and because it highlights the fact that nature is powerful and unforgiving.

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Hi folks, 4.5lb Walleye CO here.

First I'd like to contratulate Stormgren for finding the cache. I was really pleased to hear from him a few days ago and then see his picture with the cache just now. I haven't been to the site in a number of years and was happy to see the cache container survived the elements.

I must apologize to the geocaching community for being an absentee owner, having not participated in the activty since placing this one cache, and not following dicussions other than responding to the 2-3 members per year asking/commenting about the cache.

Stormgren's timing to find the cache is coincidental to my timing in going up (I will be there on Sunday June 16th), a trip I planned after being challenged by another Geocacher that the cache was not legitimate.

My route to the cache site is a little different than Stormgren's. I fly to Fort Albany and take a freighter canoe from the community up the Albany River directly to the site (4hrs +-).

For what it's worth, since I dug out my old Garmin eTrex for my trip this weekend, I decided to place my second cache in another remote part of Canada tomorrow (June 13th).

Regards,

JM

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Hi folks, 4.5lb Walleye CO here.

Welcome to the forums, jmatear. And thanks for placing the cache that has provided so many of us with so much entertainment over the last few weeks! :)

 

I haven't been to the site in a number of years and was happy to see the cache container survived the elements.

I must apologize to the geocaching community for being an absentee owner, having not participated in the activty since placing this one cache, and not following dicussions other than responding to the 2-3 members per year asking/commenting about the cache.

No need to apologize - at least, not to me. You placed this (now famous) cache long ago, at a time when geocaching was new, and nobody knew exactly how this whole thing would eventually pan out. And, speaking for myself, the fact that you've responded to inquiries over the years and posted here today kind of disqualifies you from the "absentee owner" category.

 

Can you please-oh-please-oh-please share with us the details of how you came to place this (now) legendary cache in the first place? :)

 

I decided to place my second cache in another remote part of Canada tomorrow (June 13th).

Awesome! Your new cache might receive more initial attention than your last cache did when you first placed it.

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Hi folks, 4.5lb Walleye CO here.

Welcome to the forums, jmatear. And thanks for placing the cache that has provided so many of us with so much entertainment over the last few weeks! :)

 

I haven't been to the site in a number of years and was happy to see the cache container survived the elements.

I must apologize to the geocaching community for being an absentee owner, having not participated in the activty since placing this one cache, and not following dicussions other than responding to the 2-3 members per year asking/commenting about the cache.

No need to apologize - at least, not to me. You placed this (now famous) cache long ago, at a time when geocaching was new, and nobody knew exactly how this whole thing would eventually pan out. And, speaking for myself, the fact that you've responded to inquiries over the years and posted here today kind of disqualifies you from the "absentee owner" category.

 

Can you please-oh-please-oh-please share with us the details of how you came to place this (now) legendary cache in the first place? :)

 

I decided to place my second cache in another remote part of Canada tomorrow (June 13th).

Awesome! Your new cache might receive more initial attention than your last cache did when you first placed it.

 

Thanks for your note.

 

 

I am a bit of an early adopter and bought a GPS after discovering geocaching.com. I was traveling to Fort Albany a few times per year and thought it might be a good place to hide a cache, thinking only a few people would find it each year. I am friends with a few local folks and would go fishing up river every once in awhile, and took one of those opportunities to place the cache. We were close to the site of the cache one day fishing when my friends son caught a 4 1/2 lb walleye. We had a shore lunch at the site and placed the cache nearby.

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Hi folks, 4.5lb Walleye CO here.

Welcome to the forums, jmatear. And thanks for placing the cache that has provided so many of us with so much entertainment over the last few weeks! :)

 

I haven't been to the site in a number of years and was happy to see the cache container survived the elements.

I must apologize to the geocaching community for being an absentee owner, having not participated in the activty since placing this one cache, and not following dicussions other than responding to the 2-3 members per year asking/commenting about the cache.

No need to apologize - at least, not to me. You placed this (now famous) cache long ago, at a time when geocaching was new, and nobody knew exactly how this whole thing would eventually pan out. And, speaking for myself, the fact that you've responded to inquiries over the years and posted here today kind of disqualifies you from the "absentee owner" category.

 

Can you please-oh-please-oh-please share with us the details of how you came to place this (now) legendary cache in the first place? :)

 

I decided to place my second cache in another remote part of Canada tomorrow (June 13th).

Awesome! Your new cache might receive more initial attention than your last cache did when you first placed it.

 

Thanks for your note.

 

 

I am a bit of an early adopter and bought a GPS after discovering geocaching.com. I was traveling to Fort Albany a few times per year and thought it might be a good place to hide a cache, thinking only a few people would find it each year. I am friends with a few local folks and would go fishing up river every once in awhile, and took one of those opportunities to place the cache. We were close to the site of the cache one day fishing when my friends son caught a 4 1/2 lb walleye. We had a shore lunch at the site and placed the cache nearby.

 

Well, now that your cache has been found after 12 years maybe its also time for you to find a cache. If Stormgren-X hid one during his trip it might be cool for you to find it.

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My route to the cache site is a little different than Stormgren's. I fly to Fort Albany and take a freighter canoe from the community up the Albany River directly to the site (4hrs +-).

 

 

You have something like this? James Bay Freighter

 

Yes. But not so full.

 

Of course not. :lol: Did you ever venture further upstream than the area of 4.5lb Walleye? Obviously you can carry gas cans in that canoe, but there comes a point where it would be an overnite trip.

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I was traveling to Fort Albany a few times per year and thought it might be a good place to hide a cache

You were right! :)

 

thinking only a few people would find it each year

You were wrong! :)

 

I am friends with a few local folks and would go fishing up river every once in awhile, and took one of those opportunities to place the cache. We were close to the site of the cache one day fishing when my friends son caught a 4 1/2 lb walleye. We had a shore lunch at the site and placed the cache nearby.

So that's the story behind the name of the cache and its placement. Thanks for sharing!

 

Why the Mark Osborne card? Just happened to have it with you? Or are you a big Mark Osborne fan? Or was Mark Osborne fishing with you the day you placed the cache? :laughing:

 

By the way, 3 of the 4 NHL teams that Mark Osborne played for during his career made it to the NHL playoffs this year.

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Hello Everyone,

 

Thank you all again for your support and interest. I am about halfway through writing my journal of the adventure from inception, planning, day by day logs and conclusion. I will be sending the story to geocaching blog when it is complete with photos and videos.

 

Also, I just finished a short interview with podcacher podcasts that will air on Sunday evening! More detail will follow in my journal.

 

http://www.podcacher.com/

 

Regards,

 

Stormgren-X

 

Chris Wereley

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Hello Everyone,

 

Thank you all again for your support and interest. I am about halfway through writing my journal of the adventure from inception, planning, day by day logs and conclusion. I will be sending the story to geocaching blog when it is complete with photos and videos.

 

Also, I just finished a short interview with podcacher podcasts that will air on Sunday evening! More detail will follow in my journal.

 

http://www.podcacher.com/

 

Regards,

 

Stormgren-X

 

Chris Wereley

 

Thanks for posting the link, Chris. It was so great to talk to you and hear the story first-hand. I wouldn't say "short" - the interview was about 36 minutes of great stuff!!

 

Look for show 425 to be posted sometime Sunday evening. I'll try to remember to come back to this thread to post a direct link.

 

Sonny & Sandy

Team PodCacher

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Thanks for posting the audio link.

 

This link will take you to the Show Notes page where you can find video links, see photos and more.

 

http://j.mp/11s1TUG

 

Excellent! Listened to the show, and checked out all the links. Don't forget to look at the show Flikr set, where you'll see about 15 photos. The Youtube videos are excellent too, and Ghost River was amazing, you have to see those two videos. And if you listen closely, they did place a cache there. :P

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"Thanks for posting the audio link."

 

Welcome! Enjoyed the podcast... follwed a bunch of the links as well, the youtube videos reminded by of my younger tripping jaunts in that area... I'll continue to forget the blackflys and skeeters though.

 

Inpired a bit by this adventure, I made a halfhearted reconnaisance trip up a local mountain yesterday. Other than starting way to late waiting for a buddy, it went okay, did get further up than my last try, but blowdown on the trail was also slowing us down. Turned back when we ran out of time and into some high level showers. We did do some minor trail work on the way down making it a bit easier to cross the obstructions, but only had a little sierra saw and some rope. May pack a folding saw next trip. Figure I got within a estimated trail distance of 720 metres (horizontal via GE path ruler) however there is a strong vertical component there too. Point is I got of my butt and got up there... so I'm already prepping a better and earlier go soon. Nothing worthy of a podcast though. It's just a personal vendetta. ha!

 

Doug 7rxc

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Awesome videos. Thank You for posting them. I was very curious about what the landscape looked like up there and how fast the river was flowing.

 

I hope that whoever makes the trip to find the caches that you guys placed document their trip just as well.

 

Great job

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