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What Irks you most?


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The other day, while I was on a caching tour, I got a message (via GC "Message Center") from a cacher I've never heard of, that they can't find a stage of one of my multis, and if I could give them a hint. There is a spoiler photo for that stage, so I asked if they had seen it and also added a short description of the hide. No success at first, but after a bit of back-and-forth messaging, they finally wrote "Found it. Thanks". All this took 15-20 minutes in total, while I was in the woods, interrupting my own hiking and caching every few minutes to type on the phone. But that's not what irked me - support for finders of owned caches is, at least to some extent, part of the job as a CO.

 

What did irk me, were the logs I received for the multi (a 7-stage,  5 km, T3 affair with several "interesting" locations) and the bonus. The multi got two words + an emoji, while the bonus got only an emoji. Nothing about the experience, and not a single word mentioning, let alone thanking for, the "live support".

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3 hours ago, baer2006 said:

What did irk me, were the logs I received for the multi (a 7-stage,  5 km, T3 affair with several "interesting" locations) and the bonus. The multi got two words + an emoji, while the bonus got only an emoji. Nothing about the experience, and not a single word mentioning, let alone thanking for, the "live support".

 

I'm so sorry you received those lousy logs.  The same has happened to me when I've responded instantly to questions from unknown cachers out in the field.  The descriptive logs that reward cache owners are becoming a lost art.  That irks me, regardless of whether I helped the finder via the message center.

 

In contrast, on the few occasions when my partner and I have reached out to a CO for help, it instantly becomes a memorable part of the cache hunt and thus a vital part of my log.  I offer this example, and you are welcome to pretend that you received this log (it's actually from a 5/3 gadget cache halfway up a mountain):

 

Quote

Team Irish Gold finally succeeded in opening this cache and signing the logbook after spending around an hour in two different visits, separated by a much easier visit to another of your gadget caches nearby. We also met one other group of muggle hikers, plus a neighboring landowner enjoying the area on his Quad.

While it turned out we found all we needed to find, and we had some good ideas for the cache's final secret, it took some coaching and encouragement via messaging with the helpful CO to boost us to final success. This is one of the most difficult caches I've ever found, and it's deserving of all its stars for both difficulty and terrain. It's also deserving of not just a favorite point, but also a spot on my "Top 5% Greatest Caches" bookmark list. We had a great day of geocaching to take our minds off the pandemic, and most of that was thanks to you.

 

 

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4 hours ago, baer2006 said:

What did irk me, were the logs I received for the multi (a 7-stage,  5 km, T3 affair with several "interesting" locations) and the bonus. The multi got two words + an emoji, while the bonus got only an emoji. Nothing about the experience, and not a single word mentioning, let alone thanking for, the "live support".

I like to write good logs on 'proper' caches, so a multicache would be a 'proper' cache and you would more than likely get a descent log from me. Where I am failing to write decent logs (any log in fact) is for ALs. One because I have heard that COs don't get notifications of 'finds' and the other reason is my annoyance that these are taking over from 'proper' caches, and I simply can't be bothered to write a nice log for them. I mostly only find ALs within cycling distance of my house, because that gives me exercise, and I am more motivated to get this exercise, if I have a destination. If I travel to other places I mostly ignore them, unless I have already cleaned out other caches from that area. Or if I am with other people and they want to do the AL. I had to do one AL, because I collect SideTracked caches, and the bonus cache was the SideTracked cache, so to find the coordinates for that, I had to complete the AL. Late in the day, I was running late for dinner and the AL was taking me all over the place and I was grumbling :anibad:, as all I wanted was the bonus cache to get my SideTracked score up one more. Finally got the coordinates to the real cache :laughing:.

You would get a decent log from me for a 5 km multi. To do otherwise, would trivialise the effort of both parties.

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12 minutes ago, WendeeP said:

Geocachers who log finds online but don't sign the logbook.

How do I know they have really found the cache.

Should I delete their online logs?

 

Most CO's (who care) will reach out to them once, asking for an explanation and some proof that they were really there, such as a description of the hide, position, container, etc., and if there's no response in a month or the response sounds bogus, delete.

 

Just be prepared to answer questions from HQ if they try to get their log reinstated.

 

Also, there's the nasty question of retribution, but oh, I'm not going there.

 

Thanks for thinking this is import. I think so, too.

 

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13 minutes ago, WendeeP said:

Geocachers who log finds online but don't sign the logbook.

How do I know they have really found the cache.

Should I delete their online logs?

I would contact them first and ask for an explanation. Are you sure they did not sign the log? Were they with a group of people who all signed one name? I would ask first before deleting the online log. 

This is just my personal opinion. When I get a bunch of logs from the same geocacher saying they found the cache but didn't sign the log cuz they didn't have a pen, I will send them a friendly note letting them know I'm giving them one free pass but in the future they need to bring a writing utensil with them. But this is assuming they can provide some kind of evidence that they were actually at the geocache. If they can describe it to me or something unique about it then I'll give them a free pass. But only one. 😁

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18 minutes ago, WendeeP said:

Geocachers who log finds online but don't sign the logbook.

How do I know they have really found the cache.

Should I delete their online logs?

 

That bugs us too.     You go to your cache and look ?     If you've looked, their signature's not there, and you feel you need to.

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I'm having trouble with  new cache I just placed.

 

Its a magnetic stuck to the bottom of a bridge.

 

First FTF cacher found it on the ground and put it back.

 

--I went and maintenance

 

2nd cacher found it and placed it and "made it more hidden"

 

3rd cacher with 1 find found it no problem

 

after the 3rd cacher I went to the bridge and the cache is nowhere to be seen..

 

I think there must be a gang of kids or something that like to hang out at the bottom of the bridge. As soon as I placed it and made it "live" the FTF found it on the ground..I don't get it..

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17 hours ago, The Leprechauns said:

I'm so sorry you received those lousy logs.  The same has happened to me when I've responded instantly to questions from unknown cachers out in the field.  The descriptive logs that reward cache owners are becoming a lost art.  That irks me, regardless of whether I helped the finder via the message center.

 

There's a cacher in my area who knows I believe the reward for a well-placed cache is reading the logs and that I use online logs as a critique to improve my cache design and hiding.  He only gives me logs with the word "Found".  We both know that irks me.  It wouldn't be as bad if he wasn't one of the area's major players.  For if you're a major player, you're responsible for setting an example to the other players.

 

Oh, and these newer cachers irk me.  A decade ago, everyone would find a cache I hid without intention of making it difficult to find.  These days, a noticeable percentage of newer cachers frequently post DNFs on caches that are hidden and don't have hints telling you exactly where to look.  I then waste my time going out to check on it only to find it's still there.  What's worse is when someone posts a DNF on a mystery cache with two physical stages and doesn't even tell me which stage he or she couldn't find or if the person had trouble with assembling the coordinates.  That wastes even more of my time.  Since I'm also a major player in the area, I try to be nice about it and state in an online log which stage I checked and ask if that was the stage the person had trouble finding.  A reply never came.

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I've been getting irked lately with the number of new geocachers who post dnf on puzzle caches that they didn't solve. As others have stated this has happened quite frequently in the past year. 

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20 hours ago, WendeeP said:

Geocachers who log finds online but don't sign the logbook.

How do I know they have really found the cache.

Should I delete their online logs?

I photograph the paper log and add it to my OM (owner maintenance) log which I make when I check one of my caches. Then I contact any geocachers whose signatures I can't find, telling them I can't see their signature there, but saying perhaps I missed seeing it (I did actually once not recognise the scribble as someone's signature) and could they please point out their signature to me. If they haven't signed it, could they please supply photographic proof or describe the cache and hide. I used to give them a fortnight, but after an increase of unsigned logs, I reduced that to one week. I don't believe one week has made any difference, because from my experience, those with proof of find will get back to me fairly quickly. Many with no proof, never reply, or get all vague. One got very vague and keep asking me what proof I wanted. I kept repeating the same thing. I deleted her log. She's still doing this. If she finds the cache she will sign the log and log her find, but if she can't find the cache she still logs the find. She thinks visiting a place, even if she has never managed to find the cache, is good enough. She will log a find in the middle of a long list of DNFs. She isn't a beginner.

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23 hours ago, Max and 99 said:

I've been getting irked lately with the number of new geocachers who post dnf on puzzle caches that they didn't solve. As others have stated this has happened quite frequently in the past year. 

 

You could probably cull a few DNFs like that occasionally without any major issue (other than some irking on the geocachers' side, relative to how 'friendly' you make the process). It's not like deleting find logs. You could post a note explaining the dnf deletions that weren't related to the container at all. I mean, if DNFs could count as "couldn't solve the puzzle" then the puzzle-caching realm could be overloaded with them legitimately, which is just dumb.  If a DNF moreso implies trouble finding a container, cleaning them up from your own listings I think is actually a good thing towards a more accurate impression of the cache state... :) 

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13 hours ago, sernikk said:

I think I got a new one:

Lack of response for reported bugs

 

:unsure:

I reported something last year.  When you make an email address your main one, it disappears from the list of email addresses to which you can send pocket queries and notifications.  Because of that, I don't have any email addresses listed for either of those features.  Fortunately, I can still reuse old pocket queries and I don't need to be involved in the FTF game anymore.  I thought about using my moderator privileges to contact someone inside Groundspeak directly, but that's not fair to everyone else who has problems, so I must instead follow the normal process.

 

10 hours ago, Goldenwattle said:

I photograph the paper log and add it to my OM (owner maintenance) log which I make when I check one of my caches. Then I contact any geocachers whose signatures I can't find...

When I do maintenance on a cache that matters, I also audit the online logs.  I give people a couple weeks to let me know what team name they used if I don't see a date with a team name on the log, then I delete the log a few months later when I get around to doing so.  I might find a cache a day, but the logging thing happens whenever I feel like it, and so will getting around to deleting those logs.  On the other hand, if it's a cache I don't care about--one of the few park and grabs I've hidden--I don't even bother auditing.  When I get around to doing maintenance, I just archive the cache to decrease the number of caches I have to the ones I still care about these days.  And there's one cache in particular that would take me weeks to maintain--my 42 or 43 mile hiking cache--so I only check on a quarter to a third of its stages every year (but due to how I've hidden the stages, not a single one has ever needed maintenance in its eleven and a half year life--but due to the hike's length, I still make sure to check).

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16 minutes ago, Ranger Fox said:

team name on the log

There is the occasional team log, but they are not common here. Most people log individually, even when part of a team. The only time I have been part of a team log, was when a group of about 30 of us tackled a difficult cache (underground), and it would also have been a 'job' for the CO to go change the log, if we all signed and filled it up. Besides standing in the dark holding torches, with water about our feet and passing around a bit of paper would not have been a good idea. The person who organised this group outing, had us write down our names and she listed all the attendees in her log.

A group that size is very rare here. Most groups have less than ten people.

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25 minutes ago, Goldenwattle said:

There is the occasional team log, but they are not common here. Most people log individually, even when part of a team. The only time I have been part of a team log, was when a group of about 30 of us tackled a difficult cache (underground), and it would also have been a 'job' for the CO to go change the log, if we all signed and filled it up. Besides standing in the dark holding torches, with water about our feet and passing around a bit of paper would not have been a good idea. The person who organised this group outing, had us write down our names and she listed all the attendees in her log.

A group that size is very rare here. Most groups have less than ten people.

I remember doing underground caches.  There was one that had over a dozen different underground sections.  Once the cache was archived, the cache owner told me I was the only one to ever attempt his cache completely solo.  I was surprised.  (Not like I had a choice: no one else was interested in driving three hours away to do something like that.)

 

I don't have too many teams come through my area as well, but I have the occasional log that said a couple friends grouped together and signed all logs using parts of everyone's handles.

 

I'm on the fence about doing team cache runs.  I don't mind as long as there are four or fewer people on a team.  Any more than that and I get nervous about people wanting to split up and claim everything.  I was once invited to do a number run in France, but backed out when I heard around twenty people were going to go.  Sure enough, they split apart and claimed everything, rightfully upsetting the French cache owners.  After being involved once in divide and conquer by accident, I made sure other runs I'd be on wouldn't do that.  Now, because of my morality, I find myself having to do trips alone--and that's no fun.  I'm not sure what lesson I learned.

 

Here's another think that irks me: people not doing what you agree upon.  I was in the desert with someone--not even on a road.  She lost her phone the day before.  We split up to do a rectangle of about a dozen caches total because of the terrain (she wasn't able to walk to those, so had to drive around).  We started at the northwest point and I said I'd walk south and meet her at the southwest point, then head west.  We'd only be apart for about forty-five minutes, if at that.  I'll be brief because this is a whole story.  Five hours later, I still hadn't seen the person.  I only had one bottle of water and that had been exhausted.  I finally had to call some other cachers to pick me up.  What happened was she decided to go east instead.  That wasn't the plan.  And it upset me even more that later I had to comfort HER, saying it was okay she broke our agreement and left me stranded in the desert as everything turned out fine.  No apology.

 

I could go on, but I have to put in more uncompensated overtime at work now.  Ay, Hamlet, there's another thing that rubs.

Edited by Ranger Fox
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3 minutes ago, Ranger Fox said:

underground

We did two caches on that day.  The two caches were both close together. The first leg (there were other sections) was about a km along an underground storm water pipe. We had checked the weather carefully.

Entering the under world.

1947767113_UndergroundCanberra4.thumb.jpg.c24b4de441f4e434566538527fdc8191.jpg

 

Looking for one of the caches

971616352_UndergroundCanberra6.thumb.jpg.9592aa4651f99e8e64ec902fa712cbbc.jpg

 

Amazing where shopping trolleys can be found

359816350_UndergroundCanberra19.thumb.jpg.7b61728f9573ae65456edc5bdc155d1d.jpg

 

There were areas of light.

1692133107_UndergroundCanberra8.thumb.jpg.aad3232b4f24c6e790ab7c6a67d5dd12.jpg

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1 minute ago, Goldenwattle said:

We did two caches on that day.  The two caches were both close together. The first leg (there were other sections) was about a km along an underground storm water pipe. We had checked the weather carefully.

Thank you for sharing the photos.  A lot of the drain tunnels I've had to enter involve either crawling or duck walking (knees bent to the extreme and hunched over).

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6 minutes ago, Ranger Fox said:

Thank you for sharing the photos.  A lot of the drain tunnels I've had to enter involve either crawling or duck walking (knees bent to the extreme and hunched over).

Another tunnel did get like that. One cache involved three tunnels. Most of those photographs are from the first tunnel; the big one. We followed that for about a km. Information was worked out for the multi (local knowledge) which meant we could miss doing the second tunnel. Some still insisted on doing it though and they came back muddy. I think the end of that tunnel involved crawling, low through mud. The third tunnel involved wading under a shopping centre. We started singing, and it must have been weird above, as I imagined our ghostly choir sounds would have filtered up through the grids above. How much people had to bend also depended on height. Some people did a lot more bending than others.

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1 hour ago, on4bam said:

Getting a notification on this thread only to find out the post is not there anymore.

 

 

 

Sorry about that, I realised after posting it that it was something I previously irked about in this thread so decided to axe it rather than go back over old ground.

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50 minutes ago, barefootjeff said:

 

Sorry about that, I realised after posting it that it was something I previously irked about in this thread so decided to axe it rather than go back over old ground.

You are forgiven.... ;)

 

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4 hours ago, barefootjeff said:

Sorry about that, I realised after posting it that it was something I previously irked about in this thread so decided to axe it rather than go back over old ground.

It really irks me when people do that...

 

;)

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On 4/1/2021 at 2:21 PM, baer2006 said:

What did irk me, were the logs I received for the multi (a 7-stage,  5 km, T3 affair with several "interesting" locations) and the bonus. The multi got two words + an emoji, while the bonus got only an emoji. Nothing about the experience, and not a single word mentioning, let alone thanking for, the "live support".

I certainly understand your irk, but your intro made me think of a much lesser irk. When someone asks me for help -- whether it's a puzzle or a search, whether I'm the owner or just their PAF, whether it's a major cache or just a random micro -- I'm kinda disappointed when I'm not thanked for the assist in their log. I try to at least tip my cap when someone gives me a hand in one way or another, but I never see anyone else doing it for me. I feel unappreciated!

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It looks like I'm more accepting of Adventure Labs than many around here, but they have given rise to one relatively trivial irk I rarely seen mentioned:

 

They cause serious bloating of the Hides tally on one's profile.

 

For many, that's a bigger distortion, proportionately, than 5-rather-than-1 finds. And unlike finds, you can't delete these. (Nor even put them up for adoption!)

 

I seem to almost daily find myself thinking "I haven't hidden that many caches, surely?" :)

 

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21 minutes ago, BendSinister said:

It looks like I'm more accepting of Adventure Labs than many around here

I don't think it's Adventure Labs as per say, but rather the fact they do count as five finds. If they only counted as one find, I think there would be very few gripes. Just another fun type of cache to do. They do bloat the tally.

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25 minutes ago, BendSinister said:

It looks like I'm more accepting of Adventure Labs than many around here, but they have given rise to one relatively trivial irk I rarely seen mentioned:

 

They cause serious bloating of the Hides tally on one's profile.

 

For many, that's a bigger distortion, proportionately, than 5-rather-than-1 finds. And unlike finds, you can't delete these. (Nor even put them up for adoption!)

 

I seem to almost daily find myself thinking "I haven't hidden that many caches, surely?" :)

 

 

Yes, I've been startled a couple of times by the same thing as my profile says I have 65 hides when I've only created 55 (3 of them adopted) and 2 ALs. Creating each of the ALs probably took less time and effort than many of my other hides yet they each count as 5. But even though they're enumerated in the profile, you can't actually click on them to see what they are. That's kept secret.

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This isn't something that Irks me, but could hardcore troll/irk others, I will never do this: Daft distances travelled from posted coordinates for a cache.
So Puzzle caches need to have their final within 2 miles of the posted coordinates but could a troll have intermediate stages further away? If so it could be a pricey journey internationally back and forth across countries.
A multi cache or letterbox cache at the moment doesn't have that 2 mile distance rule as far as I can research so you could totally do that long distance punishment across countries. This wouldn't be so bad as part of a teamwork cache but is still a special type of evil.

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7 minutes ago, CheekyBrit said:

This isn't something that Irks me, but could hardcore troll/irk others, I will never do this: Daft distances travelled from posted coordinates for a cache.
So Puzzle caches need to have their final within 2 miles of the posted coordinates but could a troll have intermediate stages further away? If so it could be a pricey journey internationally back and forth across countries.
A multi cache or letterbox cache at the moment doesn't have that 2 mile distance rule as far as I can research so you could totally do that long distance punishment across countries. This wouldn't be so bad as part of a teamwork cache but is still a special type of evil.

They still have to convince the reviewer they can maintain it if it's far from home.

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39 minutes ago, CheekyBrit said:

This isn't something that Irks me, but could hardcore troll/irk others, I will never do this: Daft distances travelled from posted coordinates for a cache.
So Puzzle caches need to have their final within 2 miles of the posted coordinates but could a troll have intermediate stages further away? If so it could be a pricey journey internationally back and forth across countries.
A multi cache or letterbox cache at the moment doesn't have that 2 mile distance rule as far as I can research so you could totally do that long distance punishment across countries. This wouldn't be so bad as part of a teamwork cache but is still a special type of evil.

You don't have to find every cache.

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Write at least a single complete sentence in your log, dangit!

What also irks me is people that reply to a forum topic with an opinion that probably has been mentioned 1000 times already. ;)

Edited by Lostboy1966
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7 hours ago, CheekyBrit said:

This isn't something that Irks me, but could hardcore troll/irk others, I will never do this: Daft distances travelled from posted coordinates for a cache.
So Puzzle caches need to have their final within 2 miles of the posted coordinates but could a troll have intermediate stages further away? If so it could be a pricey journey internationally back and forth across countries.
A multi cache or letterbox cache at the moment doesn't have that 2 mile distance rule as far as I can research so you could totally do that long distance punishment across countries. This wouldn't be so bad as part of a teamwork cache but is still a special type of evil.

I would certainly want to know ahead of time if the multicache was only going to take me a few miles or 100 miles. 

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8 hours ago, CheekyBrit said:

This isn't something that Irks me, but could hardcore troll/irk others, I will never do this: Daft distances travelled from posted coordinates for a cache.
So Puzzle caches need to have their final within 2 miles of the posted coordinates but could a troll have intermediate stages further away? If so it could be a pricey journey internationally back and forth across countries.
A multi cache or letterbox cache at the moment doesn't have that 2 mile distance rule as far as I can research so you could totally do that long distance punishment across countries. This wouldn't be so bad as part of a teamwork cache but is still a special type of evil.

 

There's a 6-stage multi (GCK2GM) with its first location in Sydney's Royal Botanical Gardens. A couple of years ago I was in Sydney doing some other caches around the harbour and included this one on my list, printing out the description so I'd have the formulas for the coordinates of the later waypoints. I should have paid closer attention to what I was printing out, though, for the first line of the description says, "The ideal cache to break the monotony of an interstate road trip." Yes, the subsequent waypoints are spread down the coast with the final in Melbourne's gardens some 1000km away. I twigged after I'd found the first waypoint and stuck the numbers into the coordinates for the second. Nothing wrong with the cache and nothing trollish about its owner, it was my own fault for not paying close enough attention, and if I ever decide to drive down the coast road to Melbourne I'll certainly be doing it along the way.

 

I own a couple of caches that involve some degree of travelling (tens of kilometres) but their virtual waypoints are visible so that should be apparent from just looking at the small map on the cache page. One, a multi, has its three waypoints on railway stations spread along some 18km of track, with the final a T4 hike up from one of those stations, and the other, a field puzzle mystery, has its bogus coordinates less than a hundred metres from the final but the six waypoints that have to be visited to solve the puzzle are scattered around a 5km radius, with a couple requiring a boat. Reading the description before you set out is always a good idea with my caches.

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12 hours ago, CheekyBrit said:

So Puzzle caches need to have their final within 2 miles of the posted coordinates but could a troll have intermediate stages further away? If so it could be a pricey journey internationally back and forth across countries.

What has a troll to do with this? Not one of the definitions of a troll that I know. I have done several multicaches just like that, although all in Australia. I drove 12,000kms for one. They were some of the most fun multicaches that I have done. As long as it is explained where this multi will take you, as the ones I did explained, there is no problem. You don't have to do them. Your choice, but let those of us who enjoy doing such multicaches, have our fun. I completed one recently, which I began in 2016.

 

The FTF finder for one of them even took a plane flight to get FTF. Locally, that's still talked about at times :laughing:.

 

If you really think a 'troll' (call them by their proper names, armchair geocachers) published this cache and it isn't real, ignore the cache. Only do caches by geocachers you know and trust. I do know of an armchair logger who after making a long list of armchair finds, published an armchair cache. Amazing :rolleyes:, no-one ever found it! Who would have ever imaged that :drama:.

Edited by Goldenwattle
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5 hours ago, Lostboy1966 said:

Write at least a single complete sentence in your log, dangit!

What also irks me is people that reply to a forum topic with an opinion that probably has been mentioned 1000 times already. ;)

Well, they don't know this has been mentioned "1000times already", and they are entitled to their irk :laughing:.

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6 hours ago, barefootjeff said:

the final a T4 hike up from one of those stations

I'm guessing that's up from Wondabyne Station. On my last trip to Sydney I visited that station and walked up the track to find SideTracked - Wondabyne. I logged the Earth cache too while there. It was the first time I had visited a request only station and found that a bit of an adventure. I wasn't the only person getting off there. A railway employee got off too to put up new posters and a local got off with his shopping and wheeled that to the attached wharf and his moared boat. I was the only person to catch the train when I left, and waved at the train to stop. The driver honked to let me know I had been seen. The only station in Australia without road access. How did that fare in the recent floods, do you know?

 

Wondabyne Rail Station.jpg

Wondabyne walking track.jpg

Edited by Goldenwattle
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6 minutes ago, Goldenwattle said:

How did that fare in the recent floods, do you know?

 

Yes, that's the station (the cache is The Great Train Heist GC6JMDK). The final is at the top of the climb and then a few hundred metres of bush-bashing along the ridgeline to a vantage point overlooking the waterway. Mullet Creek is a tidal estuary near the mouth of the Hawkesbury with very little catchment upstream, so the floods didn't bother it apart from the water now having a decided brownish tinge.

 

 

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2 things. First of all, I hate private yard caches. I always look at the attributes on a cache site if it's on a private property. If it is, I'm not going into that direction. I hate the 30KM bike rides to find out that it's just another annoying yard cache and the owner didn't bother using the correct attribute. 

 

Second, I'm not as active anymore as I used to. The reason why I started Geocaching was the learning factor. I always enjoyed the places it took me to and enjoyed reading the descriptions of it. I learned a lot about places near my home I never knew the existence of. And while travelling it was a nice way to learn something about the place, other than the normal touristy stuff. But nowadays, at least here in the Netherlands, there are too many caches which have a site that's starts with: My kid enjoys caching, so we've hidden one ourselves near our home. Enjoy!

 

No story about an object or place nearby, no brain teaser, nothing what enriches the mind. Just we like caching, so here's one....

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I am not sure why this irks me so much but I hate micros or nanos in the woods.  I mean come on, if I had to hike a trail to get to it then it shouldn't be any smaller than small size size cache and regular with a real logbook is better.  They are great for urban or neighborhood hides, but take some time to make a good cache if it is going off the beaten path into the woods, unless it is something right off a worn or paved pathway.  You are already digging around the forest floor, decaying logs, etc you don't need to be searching for a micro under the leaves and soil, probably going to get kicked around and moved by other cachers anyway and not put back where it was.  Just my $.02 :grin:

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Folks ask a question in the forums (sometimes fibbing in the process...), don't like the answers given, then delete their OP.  Vaporized thread.

Though at least they came back...  Many ask a question, get and answer, and never return to see it.  :huh:

A shade worse than the ones who see it with no thanks/response.  Common courtesy used to be a thing...

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On 5/23/2013 at 6:01 PM, fbingha said:

I got a good one..

 

Those who find oodles of caches but don't give back by hiding <and maintaining> their own.

I'm new and don't have oodles of finds (18 right now to be exact) but I know I'll only be living in the same place for another year then moving. Does that make me a jerk or should I suck it up and find someone to adopt my theoretical cache.

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15 minutes ago, adastra25 said:

I'm new and don't have oodles of finds (18 right now to be exact) but I know I'll only be living in the same place for another year then moving. Does that make me a jerk or should I suck it up and find someone to adopt my theoretical cache.

I had found about 800 caches before I felt able to place a cache, so no, don't feel bad about not placing a cache with only 18 finds. (Although chances are you aren't feeling bad about this :laughing:.) I respect you for that. Too many people place a cache before getting enough experience. Also sensible of you if you will be moving soon, as you might then not be able to maintain any caches you leave behind.

Find lots of caches of different types to get experience, and then one day if the situation allows place a cache. That is, if you want to. Welcome to geocaching by the way :).

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1 minute ago, Goldenwattle said:

I had found about 800 caches before I felt able to place a cache, so no, don't feel bad about not placing a cache with only 18 finds. (Although chances are you aren't feeling bad about this :laughing:.) I respect you for that. Too many people place a cache before getting enough experience. Also sensible of you if you will be moving soon, as you might then not be able to maintain any caches you leave behind.

Find lots of caches of different types to get experience, and then one day if the situation allows place a cache. That is, if you want to. Welcome to geocaching by the way :).

Thank you! I'm hoping that they'll let me build an Adventure Lab; was thinking of an area I frequent that's a small town that could use some love after two out of the last three summer seasons were cancelled...

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1 hour ago, Goldenwattle said:

I had found about 800 caches before I felt able to place a cache, so no, don't feel bad about not placing a cache with only 18 finds. (Although chances are you aren't feeling bad about this :laughing:.) I respect you for that. Too many people place a cache before getting enough experience.

In contrast, I hid my first cache before I had 100 finds. I learned a lot trying to maintain that cache, but I wouldn't have learned those things just by finding more caches. Some things you learn by owning and maintaining a cache, so you may as well jump in and hide one once you're familiar enough with the game that you know what kind of cache you'd like to own and maintain.

 

1 hour ago, Goldenwattle said:

Also sensible of you if you will be moving soon, as you might then not be able to maintain any caches you leave behind.

Yes, adastra25, the fact that you're moving is likely to be more of an issue. But the guidelines state, "Temporary caches intended to stay active for fewer than three months will not be published." So if you're planning for your cache to be available for at least 3 months, then you don't really need to worry about archiving it when you move out of the area.

 

1 hour ago, Goldenwattle said:

Find lots of caches of different types to get experience, and then one day if the situation allows place a cache.

On the subject of finding various cache types, I agree with Goldenwattle. Don't worry about the number of caches you've found before you hide one of your own. Finding a variety of different types and styles will teach you more than finding more caches of the types and styles you've already found.

 

But ultimately, you'll never learn everything about hiding caches without actually hiding caches.

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4 minutes ago, TeamRabbitRun said:

 

OK, I'll bite,

 

What'd you do?

My very first cache, GC1CWWA, is a long-ish multi with lots of virtual stages. When I placed it in 2008, it was still somewhat common to also include an English description. However, the listing was long enough as it is, I didn't really expect a lot of interest from foreign cachers anyway, so I just added a short statement, that I could provide an English version of the listing on request.

Fast forward to 2021 ... almost 13 years after publication, the very first request for an English listing came in last week! Of course it hit me unprepared ;). It took me a few hours in the evening, but I had the translation ready in time for the weekend, when the cachers wanted to go for the cache. As a source of the translation, I used an HTML copy of the listing, which I had saved as a "backup" a while ago. What I had totally failed to remember, is that I had moved the final in spring last year and not updated my HTML backup.

So I sent them a really good English version of the listing ... with the wrong formulas to calculate the final :o!

 

No log on my cache yet, because we (the cachers and I) first wanted to sort out what went wrong. Now that we know it, I of course offered that they can log a "find" anyway, if they like. So not really much harm done, but still very embarrassing for me :wacko: .

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1 hour ago, baer2006 said:

My very first cache, GC1CWWA, is a long-ish multi with lots of virtual stages. When I placed it in 2008, it was still somewhat common to also include an English description. However, the listing was long enough as it is, I didn't really expect a lot of interest from foreign cachers anyway, so I just added a short statement, that I could provide an English version of the listing on request.

Fast forward to 2021 ... almost 13 years after publication, the very first request for an English listing came in last week! Of course it hit me unprepared ;). It took me a few hours in the evening, but I had the translation ready in time for the weekend, when the cachers wanted to go for the cache. As a source of the translation, I used an HTML copy of the listing, which I had saved as a "backup" a while ago. What I had totally failed to remember, is that I had moved the final in spring last year and not updated my HTML backup.

So I sent them a really good English version of the listing ... with the wrong formulas to calculate the final :o!

 

No log on my cache yet, because we (the cachers and I) first wanted to sort out what went wrong. Now that we know it, I of course offered that they can log a "find" anyway, if they like. So not really much harm done, but still very embarrassing for me :wacko: .

 

 

Hysterical.

I sympathize - there you are with an awesome SENIOR cache, well respected, being sought by hopeful foreigners, and you stand ready to provide an awesome service, translating a complex listing for them - You're a hero all around!

 

Then..... Ouch.

 

I'm laughing WITH you on this one; we've all made head-smacking mistakes.

 

-------------

I don't know if this kind of stuff shows up over on your side of the planet, but there was a popular newspaper comic strip here in the US called "The Far Side" by Gary Larson. This is one of my favorites, and hangs above my desk at work as a constant warning:

 

Awe.thumb.jpg.a8ae92411f37c967ea3a9ced1a503a71.jpg

 

Wunderbar, einfach wunderbar. Soviel dazu, ihnen Ehrfurcht zu vermitteln.

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