Jump to content

Looking for the best strategy for tackling a power trail


Followers 2

Recommended Posts

Have food and drink handy.

If all or most of the caches are on one side of the road proceed down the trail so those are to your right so you don't have to buck traffic every time you pull off.

Many trails instruct you to bring a micro/log with you ....place it for the first one you find picking up the CO's cache......someone can sign the log on the way and the swap continues.

Bring a bag full of containers and logs to assist in maint.

Link to comment

We're looking for the best strategy for tackling a power trail. What suggestions do you have?

 

Thanks!

 

GeoMeerkats

I think you're experienced enough to know exactly what it's all about.

If not, walk upstairs, look in the mirror, ask yourself is this really what it is all about. If the answer is yes then just load with food and water and get it over with.

Edited by Legochugglers
Link to comment

We're looking for the best strategy for tackling a power trail. What suggestions do you have?

 

Thanks!

 

GeoMeerkats

I think you're experienced enough to know exactly what it's all about.

If not, walk upstairs, look in the mirror, ask yourself is this really what it is all about. If the answer is yes then just load with food and water and get it over with.

 

If I knew all about power trails, why would I need to ask about them? The rest of your response makes no sense.

Link to comment

Do you really need 3 of the same thread in 3 different forums?

 

B.

 

I don't know about you but I only have a watch on one forum. Posting on more than one forum ensures that more people see my posts, will respond and I will get more useful responses from a wider audience than I would otherwise.

 

If you have nothing useful to post about the topic don't waste your time responding.

Link to comment

Do you really need 3 of the same thread in 3 different forums?

 

B.

 

I don't know about you but I only have a watch on one forum. Posting on more than one forum ensures that more people see my posts, will respond and I will get more useful responses from a wider audience than I would otherwise.

 

If you have nothing useful to post about the topic don't waste your time responding.

 

Forum Guidelines

http://forums.Groundspeak.com/GC/index.php?app=forums&module=extras&section=boardrules

 

8. Spam: Posting the same message, or an unsolicited commercial message, to one or many topics or boards is considered spamming and may result in a restriction on future forum posting privileges. Duplicate messages may be deleted or consolidated by our moderators. Please do your best to post new topics to the appropriate forum board. Moderators can take action when a thread should be moved to a more appropriate section.

 

B.

Link to comment

We're looking for the best strategy for tackling a power trail. What suggestions do you have?

 

Thanks!

 

GeoMeerkats

I think you're experienced enough to know exactly what it's all about.

If not, walk upstairs, look in the mirror, ask yourself is this really what it is all about. If the answer is yes then just load with food and water and get it over with.

 

If I knew all about power trails, why would I need to ask about them? The rest of your response makes no sense.

Apologies... after caching for 6 years I assumed you would have a reasonable understanding of what a trail of identical Micros 0.1 mile apart along a roadside would be like. If you want to give it a go (and I may do at some point) then I suggested that you ask yourself if this is what you think geocaching is all about and if the answer is yes, then great, go for it and just make sure you have plenty of food and water and petrol.

Edited by Legochugglers
Link to comment

Do you really need 3 of the same thread in 3 different forums?

 

B.

 

I don't know about you but I only have a watch on one forum. Posting on more than one forum ensures that more people see my posts, will respond and I will get more useful responses from a wider audience than I would otherwise.

 

If you have nothing useful to post about the topic don't waste your time responding.

 

You forgot to tell him about the mirror thing.

Link to comment

Sign the log in the first cache.

Watch the caches.

When the first cache is found by another cacher they will take that container to the next cache.

At this point your signature is now in the second cache.

Log it

When the next cacher comes through they will move it to the third position.

It is now time to log that cache.

Keep repeating the process until your signature finds its way into the last cache on the trail.

You are now finished and your signature has been in every cache.

Link to comment
I don't know about you but I only have a watch on one forum. Posting on more than one forum ensures that more people see my posts, will respond and I will get more useful responses from a wider audience than I would otherwise.

It's not just about you.

 

Posting the same question on three forums makes three times as many people take the time to respond. Three times the cost, one times the benefit.

 

Don't forget to revisit all three and thank everybody.

Link to comment

We're looking for the best strategy for tackling a power trail. What suggestions do you have?

 

Thanks!

 

GeoMeerkats

 

Just some feedback (never powertrailed so not an answer to your question). When I read the subject line I almost stayed away because I knew the responses you would get (but I had to click). Power trail threads are just a hot button here...It's not you...but it won't change.

Link to comment

Make sure you really like the other people in the car. Because doing power trails is really about having a lot of silly fun with some like minded friends for a long period of time more than finding the caches. Make up a silly team name, have some rubber stamps made with the name. Pack plenty of food and water; most of the power trails are out in the middle of nowhere.

Bring extra gas if you are doing one that far out there.

Link to comment

Thank you to those who responded positively.

 

We are driving from Alberta down to Arizona and back. Hence posting in the forums for those areas. Who better to give advice on the power trails in those areas than the cachers that live in those areas and have probably done them? There are several power trails that we could try on the trip, we just aren't sure which one(s) we will try yet.

 

We are also thinking of doing The Iron Horse Power Trail in Alberta later in the year, which needs to be done on foot, biking, horseback, ATV or snowmobile.

Link to comment

Are you going to actually slow down to find the containers or will you be driving and tossing out pre-signed film cans? I ask because it makes all the difference in the world as far as planning.

 

Also, will you all be in one car or recklessly racing multiple cars down a public road? Again, big difference in regards to planning.

Edited by Castle Mischief
Link to comment

Depends on your scruples / personal choices..ie leapfrogging, container swapping, etc.

 

If me, I would just do a part of it so you can understand a little of the experience, the idea of doing the same exact cache over and over and over and over and over does not appeal to me. I have more found finding a variety of caches which take me to various places, not 1000 piles of identical rocks.

Link to comment

Well I Highly recommend a couple days in Medicine Hat. We have 3 regular power trails and one geo-art trail-all easy puzzles(It's in the shape of a teepee. Medicine Hat has the worlds largest teepee)

 

With roughly 100 caches each. We have over 1000 caches in the city and I would be more than happy to play tourguide.

 

Anyway on topic-I would recommend at least 2 people-one to navigate to the cache. That person will get out and sign the log while the driver sets up the GPSr for the next cache. You could also use 2 people-driver, navigator, and log signer.

Edited by T.D.M.22
Link to comment

When I was planning Route 66 my biggest question was how long would it take, we went at a good clip and were finding 80 caches/hour. I think 50/hour is easily achievable and 100/hour quite possible.

 

If you want to complete the entire PT plan where you will spend the night as accommodations can be quite far from the middle of the PT.

 

Be wary of gas and where to find it enroute or in the case of the ET highway you'll save a lot of time if you get 10-20 gallons extra.

 

Bring lots of food and drink.

 

Bring extra film canisters.

 

Have fun, take pictures.

 

Respect the non PT caches that may be on your route.

Link to comment

ET trail 3 people or more if pushing it maybe 24 hours. My wife and I did 300 in about 7 hrs

we started out at about 50 an hr then slowed down, took pics let our lab check his Pmail had a nice picnic lunch and stopped a couple miles from Rachel Nv. no gas between Alamo and Tonapah

so take extra

 

Route 66 could possibly be done in daylight hrs if pushed, We did it on 2 different trips on our way back from Laughlin Nv.

 

Planes Trains Autos is all dirt roads a few sandy places no speed there, we have yet to finish it.

 

REMEMBER those are all desert caches take plenty of water and watch out for the desert critters.

I'm not sure if any of those are on your lists, but remember try and have fun, it does get boring :D

Link to comment

Sign the log in the first cache.

Watch the caches.

When the first cache is found by another cacher they will take that container to the next cache.

At this point your signature is now in the second cache.

Log it

When the next cacher comes through they will move it to the third position.

It is now time to log that cache.

Keep repeating the process until your signature finds its way into the last cache on the trail.

You are now finished and your signature has been in every cache.

 

Now that made me laugh! Classic answer :lol:

Link to comment

Sign the log in the first cache.

Watch the caches.

When the first cache is found by another cacher they will take that container to the next cache.

At this point your signature is now in the second cache.

Log it

When the next cacher comes through they will move it to the third position.

It is now time to log that cache.

Keep repeating the process until your signature finds its way into the last cache on the trail.

You are now finished and your signature has been in every cache.

 

:lol: Thanx for the giggle!

Link to comment

Sign the log in the first cache.

Watch the caches.

When the first cache is found by another cacher they will take that container to the next cache.

At this point your signature is now in the second cache.

Log it

When the next cacher comes through they will move it to the third position.

It is now time to log that cache.

Keep repeating the process until your signature finds its way into the last cache on the trail.

You are now finished and your signature has been in every cache.

 

Considering that this is likely to take several days, wouldn't that make the CO suspicious? :unsure:

 

Log them all with the same date, nobody is going to give a rat's rectum if you actually signed the logs or not.

 

Well, with the possible exception of yourself. ;)

Link to comment

I have done parts of a few power trails, by parking in a mid point, then the dog and I leap out and with a backpack filled with supplies, we march in one direction, exploring and grabbing caches, then round trip it back to the car nabbing a few random caches off the track, before heading back down the other way. for me it's like a mega exercise session. I'd do it with a bicycle, but the geobeast would very quickly turn that into a disastrous tangle of leash, spokes and legs! I think doing a power trail by car would need a few people to leap out as the driver cruises on, otherwise the stopping and starting might get dull.

Link to comment

Wow... Reading through the topic makes me sad. Geocaching is a great sport and there is something for everyone and cache styles for everyone. That said. We have done several power trails and will do some more.

 

We enjoy having a group that goes together. We go to every cache ourselves and sign every log. Some pick up the first cache and drop a new one then carry the first one to the next signing it in the rig as they go. Then they drop it at the second and grab that one carrying it to the third and so on.. Others leap frog when they have several cars together only going to every second or third or fourth cache depending on how many rigs they have in the group.

 

Trip Planning should include looking at the route - know if there are towns in between where you can get gas and food. If not, prepare ahead of time. Plan you motel at the start and end or even in the middle if possible. Some of the trails you might have to travel as far as you can in the day and then backtrack to a motel. If the cache page doesn't give you info - contact the cache owner and ask them some questions - like is it easy to approach from one direction or if it doesn't matter. Some trails criss cross back and forth on which side of the road they are on making it harder to safely doing the trail. Always pull off the road as far as you can and close the door on the road side of the car. Think safety for you and other people using the road. I've seen cachers stop in the middle of the road on a hill and leave their doors open to get the cache. It made it very unsafe for us to go around. Be considerate.

 

Rent a rig to save wear and tear on your own. Buy the insurance just in case. Be prepared to have to take it to get it cleaned before returning it to the rental company. (This we speak from experience - ET Hwy)

 

Stock your rig with lots and lots of water and snacks.

 

If the cache page says you need to walk to the cache, then don't drive to them, walk...

 

Most important - Use a stamp to log the cache. They are very inexpensive. The one we like best is an Ideal and cost us about $14 at a local shop. It just has both our caching names on it and is small enough that we can sign on nano's sideways. Stickers make it hard to re-roll the log and put it back into the cache. Some have just pre-written their name on a tiny piece of paper and when they next cacher comes along and pulls the log out, they fall on the ground. Then you are having to pick their log up too.

 

The most important thing about doing power trails is not the caches themselves since they are micros every 520 feet apart but the friends you go with and the time you spend together. They can be the best memories.

 

Enjoy your trip!

Link to comment

Power trails are not our thing, but common sense does come in useful.

 

Like others have said, food, water and gas.

 

Always bring a First Aid kid, especially for desert caching.

 

Bring a flashlight if you plan to be out at night. Bring extra batteries, and then bring some more.

 

Quit when you are tired. Don't risk an accident just for a few more numbers. Those same containers will still be there tomorrow. If you got them all today, then what would you have to look forward to?

 

Leave a route plan with someone not in your party. Some PTs are in remote regions. Having someone not with you whom you can check in with can save you a lot of trouble in case something unfortunate happens and you don't have cell service.

 

BTW, this same advice also pertains to most family trips and trips out of town. Much of it is just common sense.

 

Have fun. If numbers are your thing, make sure you enjoy the company you are with.

Link to comment

Wow... Reading through the topic makes me sad. Geocaching is a great sport and there is something for everyone and cache styles for everyone. That said. We have done several power trails and will do some more.

 

***major snip***

 

The most important thing about doing power trails is not the caches themselves since they are micros every 520 feet apart but the friends you go with and the time you spend together. They can be the best memories.

I don't want to make you sad, but the bolded part is what many don't understand. Personally I would spend time in another way, but I am giving FTF hounding a try (very unsuccessfully) this month so who knows.

Link to comment

Wow... Reading through the topic makes me sad. Geocaching is a great sport and there is something for everyone and cache styles for everyone. That said. We have done several power trails and will do some more.

 

***major snip***

 

The most important thing about doing power trails is not the caches themselves since they are micros every 520 feet apart but the friends you go with and the time you spend together. They can be the best memories.

I don't want to make you sad, but the bolded part is what many don't understand. Personally I would spend time in another way, but I am giving FTF hounding a try (very unsuccessfully) this month so who knows.

 

What's hard to understand, read through the logs on the E.T. highway or Route 66, it's the power trails themselves that bring people together and to the location to do them. If they weren't there then neither would geocachers. There's very few single caches that can do this on such a large scale.

I am going to Idaho next month to do the jet and start on the train with someone I only met once before, If not for the power trails we wouldn't be going.

 

I did route 66 with my kids in January, I let my son (2 days short of his 16th birthday) drive about 30 miles in my brand new car on Route 66, a memory he'll cherish for ever amongst others we created during the trip, I am so thankful those caches were there.

Edited by Roman!
Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 2
×
×
  • Create New...