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splashy

Garmin Monterra

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Seems the next Montana model is in the pipeline.

 

GPS device incorporating altimeters, compasses, accelerometers, gyroscope, GLONASS navigation system, video and still image cameras, FM and weather radio receivers, sensors for determination of sun burning portion of the UV spectrum, and a wireless communication device featuring data and image transmission, also functional to obtain software applications over the Internet for downloading to the device.

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http://www.trademarkia.com/monterra-85774909.html

 

Will this be the successor to Montana? 4 ".

Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, FM radio, Android OS, with the possibility of installing programs. Garmin is excited to introduce the new all-in-one adventure device, the Monterra. Now featuring our first Wi-Fi enabled GPS handheld built for the outdoors and powered by the popular Android operating system, the possibilities for the Monterra are endless. Users can access the full suite of apps available from the Android Market store through an available Wi-Fi connection. Additionally, app developers are free to create new outdoor-centric apps-giving the outdoor enthusiast access to favorite apps on Their rugged and waterproof and, go-anywhere handheld device. The Monterra features a large 4-Inch sunlight-readable touchscreen display, 3 axis accelerometer with compass, barometric altimeter and gyro, plus a built-in 8MP autofocus camera allowing users to take geotagged photos and capture full 1080p HD video.It comes preloaded with a Basemap worldwide, and includes 8 GB of internal memory in addition to a microSD card slot for optional mapping and extra data storage. Additionally, users can also create Their own adventure and share their tracks, pictures, and videos with friends, family or fellow explorers using Garmin Adventures.

Edited by splashy

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If it's going to be an Android device that doesn't make phone calls and has a reasonable battery, why not stick with an Android phone in a toughened case and an external battery pack?

 

Those that are into Android already will probably have an Android device, those that aren't will have a comparable Windoze or fruit based product.

 

I'm not quite getting the point of where this is going.

Edited by team tisri

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If it's going to be an Android device that doesn't make phone calls and has a reasonable battery, why not stick with an Android phone in a toughened case and an external battery pack?

 

Those that are into Android already will probably have an Android device, those that aren't will have a comparable Windoze or fruit based product.

 

I'm not quite getting the point of where this is going.

 

I'm no expert and have no crystal ball, but I can see where they could be buildin gon the strengths of the dedicated GPSr, most notably the antenna and chipset, and combining that with the versatility of the Android platform. This could open the door to a wide variety of add-on app development specifically for fine tuning the functionality of the GPSr according to interests and preferred use. For instance, if geocachers don't like how the built-in software handles the process to select and log caches, then apps can be written to change that behavior. Same can be said for hikers, hunters, and so on. Garmin comes out with the basic platform, but the fine tuning of the software features is lef tup to the app developers. Pretty smart move in many ways. I'm looking forward to seeing this thing.

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Now we will be able to use c:geo on a Garmin device. Cool.

 

I would suppose that, conceivably, you could use any app as long as you could use offline data. I've not seen anything about accessing cell networks, but you could connect via wifi hotspots and pull down data to use. Seems you could share data with others using bluetooth or NFC. Of course, this is all purely speculation until we see the final specs.

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If it's going to be an Android device that doesn't make phone calls and has a reasonable battery, why not stick with an Android phone in a toughened case and an external battery pack?

 

Those that are into Android already will probably have an Android device, those that aren't will have a comparable Windoze or fruit based product.

 

I'm not quite getting the point of where this is going.

 

I'm no expert and have no crystal ball, but I can see where they could be buildin gon the strengths of the dedicated GPSr, most notably the antenna and chipset, and combining that with the versatility of the Android platform. This could open the door to a wide variety of add-on app development specifically for fine tuning the functionality of the GPSr according to interests and preferred use. For instance, if geocachers don't like how the built-in software handles the process to select and log caches, then apps can be written to change that behavior. Same can be said for hikers, hunters, and so on. Garmin comes out with the basic platform, but the fine tuning of the software features is lef tup to the app developers. Pretty smart move in many ways. I'm looking forward to seeing this thing.

 

I guess I don't see why someone who already has an Android phone would want another large Android device that's bigger than an Android phone but doesn't make calls. If I wanted an Android device I'd look for an app to run on a Samsung Galaxy S3 that I could also use to make phone calls and wouldn't cost me as much as a Monterra.

 

If I wanted a Windoze or fruit phone I'd use those, in which case I wouldn't want another device with another operating system to deal with and the associated requirement to buy more apps for it when I could just use my phone.

 

You can already get a bluetooth GPSr dongle with a decent chipset so it's not like a dedicated GPSr has much extra to offer there. I've always seen the attractions of a dedicated unit as being ruggedness and battery life, both of which are suboptimal in most cellphones but both of which can be addressed easily enough with an aftermarket case and external battery pack.

 

I'd be interested to see just what this new gizmo is going to be but still struggle to see how it's anything other than an oversized smartphone that doesn't make phone calls.

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Unless it does something unique - or even one common thing uncommonly well - I can't imagine who will buy this, especially not in that price range.

 

What's the hook?

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Unless it does something unique - or even one common thing uncommonly well - I can't imagine who will buy this, especially not in that price range.

 

What's the hook?

 

I imagine this is an extension to the Oregon 6x0 series that support "unlimited" caches (well, four million). I get the feeling this is the GPS you load without a PC.

The big question I have is what's battery life / weight going to be. A smartphone gets terrible battery life compared to a dedicated GPS .... typically. Take the cellular radio out and battery life gets much better.

But, at $700 they have a heck of a time competing against the notion of:

 

- $200 GPS + $300 netbook.

- $200 GPS + $100 Rove + $300 smartphone

- $500 smartphone + $80 Otterbox

- $329 iPad Mini + $80 Otterbox/Lifeproof.

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Unless it does something unique - or even one common thing uncommonly well - I can't imagine who will buy this, especially not in that price range.

 

What's the hook?

 

As much as I love the latest technology the ability not have a cable and load PQs directly from the froggie isn't enough to justify this cost.

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What was the MSRP on the Montana when it was released? I recall over $600.

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I don't think the initial price point will be a product killer. It may be a bit high, but there will, as always, be places that will offer it below MSRP. It may be an initial sales limiting factor, but not a killer. The main thing, as always, will be the specs, features, feel, interface, and performance. As I said previously, I think one of the key things will be how the device gets customized by 3rd party apps or if that will even be possible. Of course if it is it will take time before anything gets developed to take advantage of the specific device. I know I won't buy one when they first come out, but it'll be interesting to see how this plays out.

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Unless it does something unique - or even one common thing uncommonly well - I can't imagine who will buy this, especially not in that price range.

 

What's the hook?

 

I imagine this is an extension to the Oregon 6x0 series that support "unlimited" caches (well, four million). I get the feeling this is the GPS you load without a PC.

The big question I have is what's battery life / weight going to be. A smartphone gets terrible battery life compared to a dedicated GPS .... typically. Take the cellular radio out and battery life gets much better.

But, at $700 they have a heck of a time competing against the notion of:

 

- $200 GPS + $300 netbook.

- $200 GPS + $100 Rove + $300 smartphone

- $500 smartphone + $80 Otterbox

- $329 iPad Mini + $80 Otterbox/Lifeproof.

 

Yep, or $300 smartphone, $80 Otterbox and the remaining $320 buys a very large pile of batteries to extend the life of the smartphone.

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Faked web image of the Garmin Monterra. :( Wouldn't it be nice??

1366213005.jpg

Edited by yogazoo

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Yeah, realized just after posting. You beat me to the correction. Thanks.

Edited by yogazoo

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Just what we need, a GPS with a direct link to twitface so people can tell the world about every single step they take on their walk to the delicious cup of coffee they insist on broadcasting to everyone and their dog.

 

ETA: I see the picture is faked, just thinking if it's just another device that wants me to share my location and my every move with twitface my level of interest in it just took a step down.

Edited by team tisri

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I guess I don't see why someone who already has an Android phone would want another large Android device that's bigger than an Android phone but doesn't make calls. If I wanted an Android device I'd look for an app to run on a Samsung Galaxy S3 that I could also use to make phone calls and wouldn't cost me as much as a Monterra.

 

If I wanted a Windoze or fruit phone I'd use those, in which case I wouldn't want another device with another operating system to deal with and the associated requirement to buy more apps for it when I could just use my phone.

 

Ignoring the price and utility arguments for the moment... Just because this is probably using Android, doesn't mean that it will actually behave like an Android device that you buy as a smartphone, or a PMP (like Samsung sells). Android makes a decent foundation for a mobile device that needs touch screen support. There are quite a few devices now that use Android as the OS, but completely reskin the UI to be unique. Including ones you wouldn't expect to run it.

 

As far as I know, the current crop of Nuvis have migrated to Android as the underlying OS.

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Just what we need, a GPS with a direct link to twitface so people can tell the world about every single step they take on their walk to the delicious cup of coffee they insist on broadcasting to everyone and their dog.
And here I thought that I was the only one who wondered why anyone would want to broadcast their every step in life.

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I guess I don't see why someone who already has an Android phone would want another large Android device that's bigger than an Android phone but doesn't make calls. If I wanted an Android device I'd look for an app to run on a Samsung Galaxy S3 that I could also use to make phone calls and wouldn't cost me as much as a Monterra.

 

If I wanted a Windoze or fruit phone I'd use those, in which case I wouldn't want another device with another operating system to deal with and the associated requirement to buy more apps for it when I could just use my phone.

 

Ignoring the price and utility arguments for the moment... Just because this is probably using Android, doesn't mean that it will actually behave like an Android device that you buy as a smartphone, or a PMP (like Samsung sells). Android makes a decent foundation for a mobile device that needs touch screen support. There are quite a few devices now that use Android as the OS, but completely reskin the UI to be unique. Including ones you wouldn't expect to run it.

 

As far as I know, the current crop of Nuvis have migrated to Android as the underlying OS.

 

If it's completely reskinned then perhaps it might offer something over and above immediate expectations, I guess I still don't see why one Android device will run apps that another Android device won't run.

 

If the purpose of moving to Android is the ability to run third party apps, what stops me from running the exact same third party apps on an Android phone?

 

If Android is just a better base for Garmin to build their GPS app that would be a different thing entirely, but in that case there's no need for anyone to know just what sits under the user interface.

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There are some signs that it might be released around the 6th June. It will be interesting to see what materialises over the next few weeks.

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I guess I don't see why someone who already has an Android phone would want another large Android device that's bigger than an Android phone but doesn't make calls. If I wanted an Android device I'd look for an app to run on a Samsung Galaxy S3 that I could also use to make phone calls and wouldn't cost me as much as a Monterra.

 

If I wanted a Windoze or fruit phone I'd use those, in which case I wouldn't want another device with another operating system to deal with and the associated requirement to buy more apps for it when I could just use my phone.

 

Ignoring the price and utility arguments for the moment... Just because this is probably using Android, doesn't mean that it will actually behave like an Android device that you buy as a smartphone, or a PMP (like Samsung sells). Android makes a decent foundation for a mobile device that needs touch screen support. There are quite a few devices now that use Android as the OS, but completely reskin the UI to be unique. Including ones you wouldn't expect to run it.

 

As far as I know, the current crop of Nuvis have migrated to Android as the underlying OS.

 

If it's completely reskinned then perhaps it might offer something over and above immediate expectations, I guess I still don't see why one Android device will run apps that another Android device won't run.

 

If the purpose of moving to Android is the ability to run third party apps, what stops me from running the exact same third party apps on an Android phone?

 

If Android is just a better base for Garmin to build their GPS app that would be a different thing entirely, but in that case there's no need for anyone to know just what sits under the user interface.

 

Just the fact a device runs Android is not the sole factor in whether the device can run a particular app. Android is just 1 layer of the platform.

 

An app must be compatible with not only Android, but the version of Android you have as well as the hardware on which it runs. Not all phones use the same processors and other hardware features. In this case, I think it is safe to assume that the Monterra will be using a GPSr chipset not found in most smartphones. If that is the case, then a lot of apps may well not be able to work properly until they are modified to work with that chipset, no matter that they are Androind apps.

 

Then, if you go under the covers a bit more, the app is also dependent on whatever development environment the device was built to support. That list could be long and support just about anything or it could be absurdly short to restrict what can be run on it.

 

I am aware that there are several other considerations as well but I am not knowledgable enough to really get into it. Perhaps someone else can take the ball from here. Suffice it to say, the device designers and manufacturer have a LOT to say about what will and will not be able to run on the device.

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Can someone please tell me how the Monterra is better than the recently launched Oregon? I don't really see any advantages to having Android considering that a lot of people already have Smartphones. The screen resolution is also low so I'm not sure if there will be any app compatibility issues or not. It's expensive, but if there's justification for this device, I won't hesitate to buy it.

 

Is it true that the Monterra can accept 3 AA batteries? I think that's what the spec page is saying and it'll have up to 22 hours of battery life, which is insane.

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"Is it true that the Monterra can accept 3 AA batteries? I think that's what the spec page is saying and it'll have up to 22 hours of battery life, which is insane. "

 

3X AA yes, battery life on the last models have a max of about half time Garmin gave.

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Can someone please tell me how the Monterra is better than the recently launched Oregon?

- Wifi

- Android OS, so you can run ANY Android app such as the Groundspeak geocaching app, Google Maps, anything you want. You are not stuck with only the Garmin software.

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Can someone please tell me how the Monterra is better than the recently launched Oregon?

- Wifi

- Android OS, so you can run ANY Android app such as the Groundspeak geocaching app, Google Maps, anything you want. You are not stuck with only the Garmin software.

 

Bigger screen, UV sensor, and audio directions through the speaker or the mount's speaker to name a few things.

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https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/catalog/product/compareResult.ep?compareProduct=113522&compareProduct=113520

 

Display size, WxH: 4" diag 3"

Built-in memory: 6 GB 3.5 G

Display resolution, WxH: 272 x 480 pixels 240 x 400 pixels

Wi-Fi connectivity: yes

Microphone: yes (internal for audio capture)

Multimedia (audio/video) support: yes (MP3 player, video player, etc.)

UV sensor: yes

Android® with Google Play for complete customization

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The review posted by insig worked for me since I don't speak German (barely Garmin) but it does say it can run Chrome. That means I can not take my laptop when I travel. Use the iPad to setup PQs and then download them directly to the device. Upload the geo_visits file to field notes and the do the log on the iPad.

 

Nice, Will get one when they hit the USA.

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Now that they are running Garmin software on Android I wonder what the chances of seeing a Play store version will be. I know there are pros and cons to Garmin doing this but imagine the possibilities if they did open it up for phones instead of dedicated Garmin hardware.

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I don' t think they will ever do that, a Garmin Gps app will costs about 10-20, a real Gps about 300 - 500.

According to what I read and understood the Garmin stuff will work on a different and separated OS than the Androis stuff.

Also Garmin stuff has it's own screen(s).

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I'm not sure I understand your logic Splashy. Garmin already sell a mapping app for IOS devices. If they feel happy making money there, why not on Android as well?

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Hi,

I had a Monterra Preview Unit for one day. Somebody urged me <_< to translate my lunchtime-Video of it.

 

It gives some impression what is working and how it's going to be using it.

 

ksmichel

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Am I the only person who thinks this is a total step in the right direction and who will be prepared to pay the price tag? I currently use a montana, as well as a tomtom in the car and a small garmin for on the mtb. I also use my phone in the field to log the caches as and when I find them depending on whether I have phone signal, I also have to get it out to use it as a temporary torch and to take pictures of logbook details like bonus info. For me this will mean those three devices will be surplus to requirements. All very well saying just use an android phone alone and get the case and a gps add on (i used my phone for a Wherigo the other day couldnt get below the 5m neccessary to active the next stage) as well as a battery pack to boost it.... my god soon ill have to carry a bag full of electronic gear! This wouldn't even then supply me with the OS maps which are necessary as far as Im concerned when it comes to navigating around between caches. If only this had its own internet it would be perfect IMO, but ill just make my samsung create a wifi field and piggyback off its. All I need now is the ability to log a lot of caches on C:geo and then active the wifi for a minute or two while all the currently saved logs get sent!

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I like what I see so far, but it is just too pricey for me, especially since my caching time is so limited these days.

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I've mixed feeling about this one, but for now I think I will buy it.

 

You are pretty daring, after all the misery with your Montana. I am going to wait a looooooonnnggg time, till I'm sure the bugs are out.

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Am I the only person who thinks this is a total step in the right direction and who will be prepared to pay the price tag? I currently use a montana, as well as a tomtom in the car and a small garmin for on the mtb. I also use my phone in the field to log the caches as and when I find them depending on whether I have phone signal, I also have to get it out to use it as a temporary torch and to take pictures of logbook details like bonus info. For me this will mean those three devices will be surplus to requirements. All very well saying just use an android phone alone and get the case and a gps add on (i used my phone for a Wherigo the other day couldnt get below the 5m neccessary to active the next stage) as well as a battery pack to boost it.... my god soon ill have to carry a bag full of electronic gear! This wouldn't even then supply me with the OS maps which are necessary as far as Im concerned when it comes to navigating around between caches. If only this had its own internet it would be perfect IMO, but ill just make my samsung create a wifi field and piggyback off its. All I need now is the ability to log a lot of caches on C:geo and then active the wifi for a minute or two while all the currently saved logs get sent!

 

A bag full of electronic gear? Are you serious?

 

My wife's Android phone, plus a battery pack, plus a case would still fit in a space smaller than my Montana. And if you're into that kind of thing you can look for a cache, download and cache tiles from Google Maps, navigate to a cache, and then log it all from your phone.

 

I still don't quite see the point of the Monterra, maybe once a few people have used it and commented on how they get on with it I will.

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plus an added gps dongle to get the accuracy down on the odd cache to within a useable range! Plus the normal torch, head torch and spare batteries to both of those. Plus in the car the cables to charge the battery pack again depending on how long im away or out for, plus the cable to charge the phone whilst using it in the car. As well as the mount to mount the android on the dash of the car plus an additional mount to mount the phone to the bars of my mtb when i go bike caching. Soon starts to add up, just depends on what caching you do and how prepared you like to be. The only reason Im drawn more to an android phone is the ability to live track where I am so friends and loved ones can see where I've been or where I am if i dont turn up after a while.

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plus an added gps dongle to get the accuracy down on the odd cache to within a useable range! Plus the normal torch, head torch and spare batteries to both of those. Plus in the car the cables to charge the battery pack again depending on how long im away or out for, plus the cable to charge the phone whilst using it in the car. As well as the mount to mount the android on the dash of the car plus an additional mount to mount the phone to the bars of my mtb when i go bike caching. Soon starts to add up, just depends on what caching you do and how prepared you like to be. The only reason Im drawn more to an android phone is the ability to live track where I am so friends and loved ones can see where I've been or where I am if i dont turn up after a while.

 

If you get a decent phone you don't need a GPS dongle.

 

The other stuff is a real drag to carry when you use a phone. My GPS battery never, ever runs out however much I use it so doesn't need any of those horribly bulky USB cables and magically floats on my handlebars with no mount at all. It also comes equipped with a bright LED torch so I don't need to worry about anything.

 

Oh, wait...

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If you get a decent phone you don't need a GPS dongle.

 

The greatest phone in the world is useless for geocaching without good cell coverage. Even in metro-Atlanta there are dead zones.

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The greatest phone in the world is useless for geocaching without good cell coverage. Even in metro-Atlanta there are dead zones.

The greatest phone in the world doesn't need ANY cell coverage to use it's GPS features.

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The greatest phone in the world is useless for geocaching without good cell coverage.

 

Offline mapping maybe? Nokia Here for instance. Or one of the 13,198 Android apps where you can use Open Street Maps? Symbian phones used to have a Garmin app. Maybe the iPhone can do this too? So, cell-coverage isn't required.

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The Groundspeak app works perfectly fine offline and allows downloading of the caches, photos and maps.

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