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Garmin Montana 600


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Does anyone have experience with the Garmin Montana 600?

From what I have read, it seems that you can use it as a handheld GPS, then with the proper maps installed, use it just like a nuvi in a car.

Is this true? It seems to be the perfect all in one GPS.

Thanks for any info you have in advance.

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You also need to purchase the automotive mount (cradle). That gives you the speaker for voice prompts as well as the charging cradle and power connector. From what I have read in other forums, yes, the Montana makes an excellent although expensive automotive navigation device. Note that the Montana used for road navigation has lane assist arrows, but not the junction view images found on many high-end nuvis. It also has the legacy "custom multi-point routing" with via points instead of the multi-destination trip planner found on the newer nuvi's. Most users seem to prefer the legacy custom routing engine over the newer trip planner.

Edited by alandb
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You don't NEED either mount unless you WANT spoken turn by turn directions. if you're ok with beeps (annoying though they may be!) you won't need to buy either mount. 24K maps courtesy of Garmin are routable, City Navigator is routable as are OSM maps. I'm sure there are a few more but those are the ones I can come up with off the top of my head.

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You don't NEED either mount unless you WANT spoken turn by turn directions. if you're ok with beeps (annoying though they may be!) you won't need to buy either mount. 24K maps courtesy of Garmin are routable, City Navigator is routable as are OSM maps. I'm sure there are a few more but those are the ones I can come up with off the top of my head.

 

Be a little careful with OSM maps if you're driving. I've found the routing algorithms sometimes yield as good a route as it's possible to get, and sometimes yield the most bizarre routes I've ever seen.

 

When I'm cycling if it gets me into an impossible situation it's easy enough most of the time to just get off the road and look at the map in enough detail to figure out what it's doing; in the car I wouldn't want to be having to do that.

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I've owned a Montana 600 for a couple of years and I wouldn't want to use it for auto navigation. The screen isn't big enough for me and I didn't want to buy more Garmin maps. That being said, I've never tried the OSM routable maps. I have two Nuvi's that I use in my car and motorhome and both have lifetime map updates as well as traffic. Generally, however, I don't use them for navigation either as I don't trust their routing. I use them mainly for junctions I haven't been through in a while, proper lanes, and the traffic info.

 

As far as OSM routing failures, Garmin (Navteq) is pretty bad too. It seems to ignore my preferences and wants me to u-turn when I have that selected off, and it wants to put me on interstates even though I've told it to ignore those too. That's the reason I research a route well before I take a trip and then if I can get Basecamp to cooperate, I put the route in the Nuvi and motor on. I do have to ignore the voice that keeps telling me to do something I don't want to do though.

 

As cheap as some Nuvi models are today with lifetime maps, I would suggest you look at them and use the Montana for the excellent geocaching GPS that it is.

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Ok, what is an "OSM" map? Will the Garmin City Navigator maps be sufficient? I DO want spoken directions with street names.

I currently own a Etrex Legend Cx I use for geocaching and a Nuvi 1300 without lifetime maps. I am just wanting a device I can use for both geocaching and road trip vacations.

I saw a video on YouTube that showed the different "modes" the Montana 600 has, and in automotive mode it looks just like the Nuvi interface.

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Ok, what is an "OSM" map? Will the Garmin City Navigator maps be sufficient? I DO want spoken directions with street names.

I currently own a Etrex Legend Cx I use for geocaching and a Nuvi 1300 without lifetime maps. I am just wanting a device I can use for both geocaching and road trip vacations.

I saw a video on YouTube that showed the different "modes" the Montana 600 has, and in automotive mode it looks just like the Nuvi interface.

 

OpenStreetMap is the wiki link for the Garmin formatted free, routable maps. I use them for when I travel, I just download whatever country I plan to be in. Works well.

Edited by Triple Crown
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OSM maps work just fine, but you have to set your gps to the right vehicle, all maps sometimes have a weird or unlogical routing btw, there must be millions of very happy OSM users by now.

 

The Montana IS the perfect solution for in- or outdoor Gps.

 

OSM maps @

http://garmin.openstreetmap.nl/

 

OSM maps with the Montana in cycling mode give some truly spectacular routes.

 

Using Garmin's own maps I got used to my 60CSx telling me to do stuff like turning right across traffic, following a parallel road for half a mile, then turning right across the traffic again when the only benefit was to get off a busy road (with cyclepath) for that half mile. I soon learned where the quirks were close to home and ignored them.

 

Using OSM my Montana has told me to take a six-mile route that went all around the houses to get to a point that was a mile away, along a nice quiet road.

 

One specific issue with cycling is that in the UK cyclists are allowed on bridlepaths. A bridlepath can be anything from hard earth or gravel to two inches of water over six inches of mud. The latter would be hard work on a mountain bike and impassable on a road bike although if you just tell the unit "cycling" it doesn't know what sort of bike you're riding - it just knows you're allowed down the path that's ankle deep in mud and so routes you along it.

 

From what I can tell it prefers off-road routes, presumably to avoid traffic.

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I think what I will do is buy the $59.99 City Navigator Lower 49 States maps from Garmin. That is what all the Nuvis have on them that are sold in the US right?

my nuvi has all of North America, but if you only need the lower 49, that will serve you well. Then you can do a one time lifetime update purchase and apply it to the unit you put the lower 49 on and you'll get free updates once every quarter.

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I think what I will do is buy the $59.99 City Navigator Lower 49 States maps from Garmin. That is what all the Nuvis have on them that are sold in the US right?

my nuvi has all of North America, but if you only need the lower 49, that will serve you well. Then you can do a one time lifetime update purchase and apply it to the unit you put the lower 49 on and you'll get free updates once every quarter.

True, but make sure you initially buy the DVD version of City Navigator if you want to apply a lifetime map update subscription. The lifetime subscription can't be applied to the download version of City Navigator. See the Garmin FAQ here: https://support.garmin.com/support/searchSupport/case.faces?caseId={16315fb0-39b2-11de-5dd5-000000000000}

Edited by alandb
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True, but make sure you initially buy the DVD version of City Navigator if you want to apply a lifetime map update subscription. The lifetime subscription can't be applied to the download version of City Navigator. See the Garmin FAQ here: https://support.garmin.com/support/searchSupport/case.faces?caseId={16315fb0-39b2-11de-5dd5-000000000000}

 

The exact issue I ran into. Bought the download version of the maps for my Montana and also a lifetime map card from Best Buy and the two wouldnt work together. Called Garmin and told them what I had done and they sent me a DVD version and assigned my LMU card to it and I now have lifetime maps on my Montana. Best part they charge me nothing!!!

 

I use my Montana mostly for Geocaching as I have a nuvi for automotive use but have used the Montana in nuvi mode and was well pleased with it in automotive use (I do have the cradle when I use it in my truck).

 

Yeah the screen isn't as large as my nuvi but was completely useful none the less.

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Thanks guys for all the info- it really helps...

I think I will buy the DVD version of the lower 49 states and get lifetime maps.

Thanks again guys!

I don't think they have the 49 state version on DVD, if you want DVD, it's North America.

Yep, you're right. I guess I'll have to spend the extra 20 bucks.

You guys are a huge help, as I don't much about mapping software!

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Thanks guys for all the info- it really helps...

I think I will buy the DVD version of the lower 49 states and get lifetime maps.

Thanks again guys!

I don't think they have the 49 state version on DVD, if you want DVD, it's North America.

Yep, you're right. I guess I'll have to spend the extra 20 bucks.

You guys are a huge help, as I don't much about mapping software!

 

Did you see this page yet?

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Ok, what is an "OSM" map? Will the Garmin City Navigator maps be sufficient? I DO want spoken directions with street names.

I currently own a Etrex Legend Cx I use for geocaching and a Nuvi 1300 without lifetime maps. I am just wanting a device I can use for both geocaching and road trip vacations.

I saw a video on YouTube that showed the different "modes" the Montana 600 has, and in automotive mode it looks just like the Nuvi interface.

It's pretty clear that you want to spend some money, so don't let us stop you. But note that you can easily inspect the free OSM maps right on your Etrex Legend Cx and probably also on your Nuvi. The Montana will process everything faster, but you can see the quality and the various map features with your older GPSrs. If you have the audio going out to a speaker, then you can hear spoken directions with the Montana; your Nuvi can probably do that also but you eTrex won't as it has not provision for audio-out. If your experience is like mine, you won't be buying any more maps and map upgrades from Garmin, but because of this tool you may well be buying more Garmin GPSrs (I have bought two Montanas which I would not have bought if it had not been for availability of the OSM maps).

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Thanks guys for all the info- it really helps...

I think I will buy the DVD version of the lower 49 states and get lifetime maps.

Thanks again guys!

I don't think they have the 49 state version on DVD, if you want DVD, it's North America.

Yep, you're right. I guess I'll have to spend the extra 20 bucks.

You guys are a huge help, as I don't much about mapping software!

 

Did you see this page yet?

 

Yes I looked at it.

Lots of good info, I will be saving that link

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True, but make sure you initially buy the DVD version of City Navigator if you want to apply a lifetime map update subscription. The lifetime subscription can't be applied to the download version of City Navigator. See the Garmin FAQ here: https://support.garmin.com/support/searchSupport/case.faces?caseId={16315fb0-39b2-11de-5dd5-000000000000}

 

The exact issue I ran into. Bought the download version of the maps for my Montana and also a lifetime map card from Best Buy and the two wouldnt work together. Called Garmin and told them what I had done and they sent me a DVD version and assigned my LMU card to it and I now have lifetime maps on my Montana. Best part they charge me nothing!!!

 

I use my Montana mostly for Geocaching as I have a nuvi for automotive use but have used the Montana in nuvi mode and was well pleased with it in automotive use (I do have the cradle when I use it in my truck).

 

Yeah the screen isn't as large as my nuvi but was completely useful none the less.

 

Did they charge you for the DVD or send it to you for free? I ask as I've just ordered the Montana 600 and am looking around for mapping options.

How good are the Topo maps as far as locating roads?

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Ok, what is an "OSM" map? Will the Garmin City Navigator maps be sufficient? I DO want spoken directions with street names.

I currently own a Etrex Legend Cx I use for geocaching and a Nuvi 1300 without lifetime maps. I am just wanting a device I can use for both geocaching and road trip vacations.

I saw a video on YouTube that showed the different "modes" the Montana 600 has, and in automotive mode it looks just like the Nuvi interface.

It's pretty clear that you want to spend some money, so don't let us stop you. But note that you can easily inspect the free OSM maps right on your Etrex Legend Cx and probably also on your Nuvi. The Montana will process everything faster, but you can see the quality and the various map features with your older GPSrs. If you have the audio going out to a speaker, then you can hear spoken directions with the Montana; your Nuvi can probably do that also but you eTrex won't as it has not provision for audio-out. If your experience is like mine, you won't be buying any more maps and map upgrades from Garmin, but because of this tool you may well be buying more Garmin GPSrs (I have bought two Montanas which I would not have bought if it had not been for availability of the OSM maps).

 

I quite agree about the OSM maps. I'm a volunteer mapper who contributes regularly to the OSM mapping project. I live part time in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and can tell you that the OSM maps for my area are superior in many ways to the Garmin maps. Garmin will typically have more detailed coverage in any particular country but their Thailand map is literally riddled with errors. As for the OSM routing accuracy in the U.S., it sort of depends on whether there are many OSM mappers working in the area where you're driving. Some parts of the U.S. have dedicated local mappers that produce a much more detailed and accurate map then Garmin has. But then if you drive through East Mudflats Utah, maybe no body is doing that area and consequently the routing and road name accuracy is weak.

 

One other difference, and for me this is paramount, is that you can fix the OSM routing errors yourself if you join the OSM project as I did. Not so with Garmin maps. It's a long and arduous process to get any errors corrected. Mapping is not for everyone and the OSM project is both massive and complex, but if you're frustrated with Gamin's maps or the strict no-copy policies forced on you by Navtec and Garmin, maybe it's time for a change. I fully expect OSM maps to replace paid-for maps at some point in the future, jut like Wikipedia has all but replaced print encyclopedias. I've been using them on my motorcycle in S.E. Asia for years and wouldn't waste my money on a Garmin or ESRI map of Thailand or Cambodia.

 

You can try out an OSM map of your area, or state, or country, for free. You can download them with installers for Windows and Mac from the following site already mentioned in this thread. Installation is simple. Just double click on the exe file and sit back. No calls to Garmin, no unlock codes, no BS. And chances are, your map will be outdated in a month or two as the OSM Map of the World is constantly changing. No problem. Go to the site and download a new map. Better yet, get involved and work on the map in your locality where you're the one with the expert knowledge. Experience a routing error? Fix it yourself.

 

http://garmin.openstreetmap.nl/

 

A postscript: If you find yourself using OSM maps a lot, you might consider donating a few bucks via Paypal to help pay server expenses for this all volunteer project.

 

Oh, I also own a Montana 600, which is what drew me to this thread.

 

Happy Trails

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True, but make sure you initially buy the DVD version of City Navigator if you want to apply a lifetime map update subscription. The lifetime subscription can't be applied to the download version of City Navigator. See the Garmin FAQ here: https://support.garmin.com/support/searchSupport/case.faces?caseId={16315fb0-39b2-11de-5dd5-000000000000}

 

The exact issue I ran into. Bought the download version of the maps for my Montana and also a lifetime map card from Best Buy and the two wouldnt work together. Called Garmin and told them what I had done and they sent me a DVD version and assigned my LMU card to it and I now have lifetime maps on my Montana. Best part they charge me nothing!!!

 

I use my Montana mostly for Geocaching as I have a nuvi for automotive use but have used the Montana in nuvi mode and was well pleased with it in automotive use (I do have the cradle when I use it in my truck).

 

Yeah the screen isn't as large as my nuvi but was completely useful none the less.

 

Did they charge you for the DVD or send it to you for free? I ask as I've just ordered the Montana 600 and am looking around for mapping options.

How good are the Topo maps as far as locating roads?

 

It shows that both the download and DVD versions are $79.99.

You may have to pay shipping though for the dvd, I'm not sure yet as I haven't got around to buying my Montana yet.

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Ok, what is an "OSM" map? Will the Garmin City Navigator maps be sufficient? I DO want spoken directions with street names.

I currently own a Etrex Legend Cx I use for geocaching and a Nuvi 1300 without lifetime maps. I am just wanting a device I can use for both geocaching and road trip vacations.

I saw a video on YouTube that showed the different "modes" the Montana 600 has, and in automotive mode it looks just like the Nuvi interface.

It's pretty clear that you want to spend some money, so don't let us stop you. But note that you can easily inspect the free OSM maps right on your Etrex Legend Cx and probably also on your Nuvi. The Montana will process everything faster, but you can see the quality and the various map features with your older GPSrs. If you have the audio going out to a speaker, then you can hear spoken directions with the Montana; your Nuvi can probably do that also but you eTrex won't as it has not provision for audio-out. If your experience is like mine, you won't be buying any more maps and map upgrades from Garmin, but because of this tool you may well be buying more Garmin GPSrs (I have bought two Montanas which I would not have bought if it had not been for availability of the OSM maps).

 

I quite agree about the OSM maps. I'm a volunteer mapper who contributes regularly to the OSM mapping project. I live part time in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and can tell you that the OSM maps for my area are superior in many ways to the Garmin maps. Garmin will typically have more detailed coverage in any particular country but their Thailand map is literally riddled with errors. As for the OSM routing accuracy in the U.S., it sort of depends on whether there are many OSM mappers working in the area where you're driving. Some parts of the U.S. have dedicated local mappers that produce a much more detailed and accurate map then Garmin has. But then if you drive through East Mudflats Utah, maybe no body is doing that area and consequently the routing and road name accuracy is weak.

 

One other difference, and for me this is paramount, is that you can fix the OSM routing errors yourself if you join the OSM project as I did. Not so with Garmin maps. It's a long and arduous process to get any errors corrected. Mapping is not for everyone and the OSM project is both massive and complex, but if you're frustrated with Gamin's maps or the strict no-copy policies forced on you by Navtec and Garmin, maybe it's time for a change. I fully expect OSM maps to replace paid-for maps at some point in the future, jut like Wikipedia has all but replaced print encyclopedias. I've been using them on my motorcycle in S.E. Asia for years and wouldn't waste my money on a Garmin or ESRI map of Thailand or Cambodia.

 

You can try out an OSM map of your area, or state, or country, for free. You can download them with installers for Windows and Mac from the following site already mentioned in this thread. Installation is simple. Just double click on the exe file and sit back. No calls to Garmin, no unlock codes, no BS. And chances are, your map will be outdated in a month or two as the OSM Map of the World is constantly changing. No problem. Go to the site and download a new map. Better yet, get involved and work on the map in your locality where you're the one with the expert knowledge. Experience a routing error? Fix it yourself.

 

http://garmin.openstreetmap.nl/

 

A postscript: If you find yourself using OSM maps a lot, you might consider donating a few bucks via Paypal to help pay server expenses for this all volunteer project.

 

Oh, I also own a Montana 600, which is what drew me to this thread.

 

Happy Trails

 

Great information, thanks for that lengthy reply.

How pleased are you with your Montana?

They are big bucks, but they seem like great units. Also, since they act like a handheld and a Nuvi, you are really getting 2 GPSs in one...

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How pleased are you with your Montana?

They are big bucks, but they seem like great units. Also, since they act like a handheld and a Nuvi, you are really getting 2 GPSs in one...

 

I've had my Montana since Christmas and haven't used it much yet, but so far I mostly like it.

 

The only thing I've found not to like is that there's no place to attach a lanyard, which makes it rather awkward to carry. It's too big for many pockets and sometimes you just need both hands free.

 

I've come up with a solution which works pretty well for me, but I'm wondering what others use while geocaching.

 

My solution involves a harness made for hunters to carry binoculars at chest level; to this I clip a small bag (just about the right size to fit the Montana) with a mesh front; I've cut a hole in the mesh to be able to see the compass. My biggest problem with this arrangement now is putting the Montana into the bag without touching the screen.

 

Anyone have any better ideas?

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The only thing I've found not to like is that there's no place to attach a lanyard, which makes it rather awkward to carry.

Anyone have any better ideas?

 

Yeah....

 

How about Number Nine??

 

It is used like this:

 

clip1.jpg

 

Wow, well, I'll be! So there is one. I'm glad I asked; thanks for setting me straight. I had looked at that but dismisssed it because I didn't see that it went through. Interesting that this info is from a non-Garmin site; if Garmin mentions it anywhere, I sure couldn't find it.

 

I'll certainly go to this for short-term use and keep the other for when I need to carry it for a longer time, to keep the strain of the weight off my neck.

 

Thank you! Thank you!

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I've had a Montana 600 for a little over 2 years and I am very pleased with it. I guess I've been lucky, as I haven't experienced some of the problems that others have. It does exactly what I ask of it. I load my GPX file in it from GSAK and go find caches. That's what I bought it for. I have also found it to be very accurate. The large screen is a big plus for me too. As for the lanyard, that's one of the first things I added. As shown, it goes through the loop on the bottom of the unit. I have a mount for the Montana on my bike handlebars too.

 

As for maps, I just use the Florida TOPO from GPSfileDepot. It is excellent. I don't need any routable maps in my Montana because I also have two NUVI's with lifetime maps and traffic that I use in my motorhome and truck.

 

I don't think you can go wrong with the Montana.

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The only thing I've found not to like is that there's no place to attach a lanyard, which makes it rather awkward to carry.

Anyone have any better ideas?

 

Yeah....

 

How about Number Nine??

 

It is used like this:

 

clip1.jpg

 

Like Nancy, I sort of dismissed this. Thanks for the post and the pictures. Now to find a lanyard.

 

Tim

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True, but make sure you initially buy the DVD version of City Navigator if you want to apply a lifetime map update subscription. The lifetime subscription can't be applied to the download version of City Navigator. See the Garmin FAQ here: https://support.garmin.com/support/searchSupport/case.faces?caseId={16315fb0-39b2-11de-5dd5-000000000000}

 

The exact issue I ran into. Bought the download version of the maps for my Montana and also a lifetime map card from Best Buy and the two wouldnt work together. Called Garmin and told them what I had done and they sent me a DVD version and assigned my LMU card to it and I now have lifetime maps on my Montana. Best part, they charged me nothing!!!

 

I use my Montana mostly for Geocaching as I have a nuvi for automotive use but have used the Montana in nuvi mode and was well pleased with it in automotive use (I do have the cradle when I use it in my truck).

 

Yeah the screen isn't as large as my nuvi but was completely useful none the less.

 

Did they charge you for the DVD or send it to you for free? I ask as I've just ordered the Montana 600 and am looking around for mapping options.

How good are the Topo maps as far as locating roads?

 

No charge for the DVD (no shipping either)

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How pleased are you with your Montana?

They are big bucks, but they seem like great units. Also, since they act like a handheld and a Nuvi, you are really getting 2 GPSs in one...

 

I've had my Montana since Christmas and haven't used it much yet, but so far I mostly like it.

 

The only thing I've found not to like is that there's no place to attach a lanyard, which makes it rather awkward to carry. It's too big for many pockets and sometimes you just need both hands free.

 

I've come up with a solution which works pretty well for me, but I'm wondering what others use while geocaching.

 

My solution involves a harness made for hunters to carry binoculars at chest level; to this I clip a small bag (just about the right size to fit the Montana) with a mesh front; I've cut a hole in the mesh to be able to see the compass. My biggest problem with this arrangement now is putting the Montana into the bag without touching the screen.

 

Anyone have any better ideas?

 

Apologize for the long delay in this response.

 

I love my Montana. I had a 60Cx for years and loved it too before it died on me but the new Montana far outshines it. The ability to store more than one map and more than one set of waypoints would be enough to make me switch. The huge display and other features are cool too. They might have designed the lanyard loop a bit better but there are many work-arounds available.

 

That said, the Montana and the Basecamp software to manipulate maps are works in progress. The Montana firmware is undergoing constant revisions to eliminate bugs and add features. The learning curve for Basecamp and the Montana can be steep but it's worth going through. I didn't like Basecamp at first but now I think it's a vast improvement over Mapsource, the program it replaced. And of course, it works well for MACs too if you're an Apple person.

 

Here are several suggestions of places to check out if you own a Montana. One has been mentioned before in this thread. That's the Montana Forum at:

http://garminmontanagpsr.wikispaces.com There are others but IMHO this one is the best.

 

There is a similar one for Basecamp at: http://garminbasecamp.wikispaces.com This one is fairly new so there's not much there yet.

 

Two pieces of free software that I have found invaluable are used to manage maps and the Montana itself. There are JaVaWa Device Manager and the related JaVaWa GMTK to manage maps.

 

See: http://www.javawa.nl/gmtk_en.html

and:

http://www.javawa.nl/jdm_en.html

 

I got into using the GMTK tool when I wanted to have more than one OSM map on my computer and the Montana. All the maps you get from the Free Garmin Auto-routable Map site (above) have the same name (OSM_Generic_Routable) and internal ID. That means when you try to load a map of New York State into Basecamp or Mapsource and there is already an OSM map of Florida present for example, the new one replaces it. GMTK allows you to change the default name and ID to different values so you can have as many maps as you want on tap at all times. I have OSM streetmaps of Africa, Thailand, Alaska, and New York State, along with GPSFiledepot topo maps of several states in Basecamp. GMTK allows them to coexist and play well together.

 

The JaVaWa Device manager is easy to use and is arguably better at managing maps and waypoint files on your Montana than even Basecamp. I use it for enabling and disabling visibility of the multiple maps I keep on the Montana and in Basecamp. Works like a charm.

 

There are, in addition, a few other places besides this forum that contain sage advice concerning the Montana.

 

This thread, "New Gamin Montana", at ADV Rider is oriented around motorcycling but is still very good: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=688775 It currently runs to over 100 pages but is packed with useful information. Along with that is another "Montana Wisdom and FAQ" thread at: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=790308 also at ADV Rider.

 

Happy Trails,

 

Dave

 

Travel blog at: http://dswarthout.blogspot.com

Bike: Honda CBR250

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The only thing I've found not to like is that there's no place to attach a lanyard, which makes it rather awkward to carry.

Anyone have any better ideas?

 

Yeah....

 

How about Number Nine??

 

It is used like this:

 

clip1.jpg

 

Is this area also found on the 650? If so where can you find it. I just purchased the Gizzmo vest for it...but for those times I don't want to have that one it this simple attachment would be great

Edited by vonjoekasey
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clip1.jpg

 

Is this area also found on the 650? If so where can you find it. I just purchased the Gizzmo vest for it...but for those times I don't want to have that one it this simple attachment would be great

All Montana models have the lanyard connector. Why would you purchase a GizzMoVest case and not use it? Kind of defeats the purpose.
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The only thing I've found not to like is that there's no place to attach a lanyard, which makes it rather awkward to carry.

Anyone have any better ideas?

 

Yeah....

 

How about Number Nine??

 

It is used like this:

 

clip1.jpg

 

Having looked around a bit now, I was wondering where you got the Lanyard you're showing in your pictures. The couple of lanyards I've found connect with a very small cord that looks like it might break real easily.

Tim

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clip1.jpg

 

Is this area also found on the 650? If so where can you find it. I just purchased the Gizzmo vest for it...but for those times I don't want to have that one it this simple attachment would be great

All Montana models have the lanyard connector. Why would you purchase a GizzMoVest case and not use it? Kind of defeats the purpose.

 

Yes it does seem that way but if I am doing LP's etc and I don't need the GizzMovest because mostly it would be in the car, I just figure why have the extra bulk...I like the vest but I'm not one to carry my GPS around my neck. hmmm I wonder if there is a way to incorporate the two? B) This will call for a little experimentation. By the way where can you purchase the connector shown in the picture? Thanks VJK

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Yes it does seem that way but if I am doing LP's etc and I don't need the GizzMovest because mostly it would be in the car, I just figure why have the extra bulk...I like the vest but I'm not one to carry my GPS around my neck. hmmm I wonder if there is a way to incorporate the two? B) This will call for a little experimentation. By the way where can you purchase the connector shown in the picture? Thanks VJK

I don't think the "extra bulk" is going to kill you on LP's. Maybe dropping your expensive Montana on the tarmac of a parking lot might change your mind. You can add a carabiner to the GizzMoVest with a: Black Diamond Oval Carabiner

 

Clip it to a beltloop, and you can rotate it to view it without unclipping it, plus you have the leash to prevent you from losing it if you do unclip it. The other photo looks like a packstrap with an S carabiner. Drop by an REI or other sport shop that carries climbing gear.

Edited by coggins
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Do the Garmin maps even says street names on the Montana?

City Navigator, auto mount & Montana gives spoken street names

 

Whether you get spoken street names depends on the "voice" you select. I don't know if this is 100% accurate, but my experience so far is that the standard voices (at least in American English) give street names, but the extra downloadable ones do not.

 

btw, can the unwanted languages be deleted? Edit: Yes, in Mass Storage Mode, delete the unwanted files.

Edited by NanCycle
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