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SIgn the log?


Me&Geppetto
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If I find the cache why do I need to sign the log? Is the log reconciled with the online log? Sometimes the log is a tiny piece of paper with tons of scribbles on it, most illegible so it seems a little pointless to sign it. What am I supposed to sign on the log? my geocaching username? time/date?

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If I find the cache why do I need to sign the log? Is the log reconciled with the online log? Sometimes the log is a tiny piece of paper with tons of scribbles on it, most illegible so it seems a little pointless to sign it. What am I supposed to sign on the log? my geocaching username? time/date?

Yes, one of the few "rules" if you will to log a find online is to sign the log. You can find that information here.

- This shows the Cache Owner (CO) that you were actually there.

Some may check, as sometimes there are cheaters in this odd hobby and if something that doesn't look like your sig isn't in there, your find could be deleted.

 

As an aside, you've logged two of your three finds twice. You have 3 finds, not 5.

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Typically cachers sign their username and the date.

 

It proves you found the cache, retrieved it and opened it up versus (for instance) just spotting it in a tree.

 

Not too many years ago most cachers left a little thanks and maybe a tidbit about themselves in most logbooks in the large-ish caches.

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Typically cachers sign their username and the date.

 

It proves you found the cache, retrieved it and opened it up versus (for instance) just spotting it in a tree.

Well, if you spotted it in a tree, you found it, so you should be able to claim your find. What should you do then? You can't post a picture online because it shows the location. Could you e-mail it to the owner, perhaps?

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Yes, you need to sign, and date the log. That's the minimum. You can add additional info to the logbook, such as if you took or left a travel bug or geocoin. Or add info about your hike or the weather. But your geoname and date are required. Lots of cache owners will check the lookbook/sheet with the online logs. If your name is not in the book, your online log gets deleted.

Sometimes you will find a cache the also involves finding the log. That sounds odd, but it's part of the game.

The only caches I've found where it may be difficult to verify signed names with online logs are nano caches. But you've not found any of those yet.

BTW, the other post is right, you logged your two actual cache finds twice. You, or the cache owner, should delete one of the logs.

It's a fun game. There's lots to learn. Don't try to take shortcuts this early in your caching career.

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Typically cachers sign their username and the date.

 

It proves you found the cache, retrieved it and opened it up versus (for instance) just spotting it in a tree.

 

Not too many years ago most cachers left a little thanks and maybe a tidbit about themselves in most logbooks in the large-ish caches.

 

Some cachers still leave real logs. I see them once in a while and I still do it. It's kind of sad that full logs are no longer part of the game for most. I used to really enjoy paging through the logbooks at the cache site and reading about everyone else's experience. I liked that you could find a cache in the snow and read about someone complaining about the heat and mosquitoes while standing at the same spot.

 

But the chief reason is to show you were there. Some cache owners will reconcile the paper log with the online logs and if there is no corresponding paper log they delete the online log.

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To Florida biker, spotting the cache in a tree and signing the log are separate things. Many caches can be seen, but retrieving the container is part of the game. Don't take short cuts. Sign the log, or it's no find.

What if Warwick Davis or Deep Roy found a cache in a 7-foot tree? You can send a picture to the CO if you can't retrieve it, and still get a smilie.

Edited by floridabiker1
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IMO a find only counts once it is signed. Verification of the paper logs at times is necessary for online logs to be kept.

 

You can use a stamp if hand logging is not options (for whatever reason).

 

I also (personally) don't believe in "card logs". The thing where folks leave ONLY a business type card as their log (I'll except it if the log is full).

 

Think of it as a courtesy to the owner who took the time and money to place the cache.

 

What I have changed is I don't always write a full log. If I have time, there is a big log book, and it's a well done cache, I still do.

 

I LOVE when people write long logs in the paper log within the cache. I especially like it when they put something unique in that log.

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If I find the cache why do I need to sign the log? Is the log reconciled with the online log? Sometimes the log is a tiny piece of paper with tons of scribbles on it, most illegible so it seems a little pointless to sign it. What am I supposed to sign on the log? my geocaching username? time/date?

 

Welcome to the world of micro cache logs and non-maintenance owners. Personally I have no problem dogging these people to fix their caches so I can go back and properly claim a find. I have no problem making a second trip. It takes some tough skin to be accused of being a cache cop but then again I have never, ever claimed a cache that I didn't sign the logbook. Sometimes I have no choice to scratch my username initials on a bare corner, but I'm a cacher, I always sign a logbook.

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To Florida biker, spotting the cache in a tree and signing the log are separate things. Many caches can be seen, but retrieving the container is part of the game. Don't take short cuts. Sign the log, or it's no find.

What if Warwick Davis or Deep Roy found a cache in a 7-foot tree? You can send a picture to the CO if you can't retrieve it, and still get a smilie.

Making bends in the bar again, what?

 

Just what does being short have to do with the ability to climb a tree? Little to none. In fact, it probably is an advantage because of the weight/mass ratio to be pulled upward.

 

Many would object to your singling these folks out by implying that they are incapable of doing something, when you really have no idea.

Prejudice at it's finest....

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http://www.geocaching.com/guide/

 

How is the game played?

 

At its simplest level, geocaching requires these 8 steps:

 

Register for a free Basic Membership.

Visit the "Hide & Seek a Cache" page.

Enter your postal code and click "search."

Choose any geocache from the list and click on its name.

Enter the coordinates of the geocache into your GPS Device.

Use your GPS device to assist you in finding the hidden geocache.

Sign the logbook and return the geocache to its original location.

Share your geocaching stories and photos online.

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I was not aware of needing to sign your user name from here. I am usually with the kids and they sign and date the cache. I guess I need to go back to the few we have found and add my user name..hmmmm

 

Ideally you should sign with your user name, but there are exceptions. Sometimes when several cachers get together for a cache run they may make up an ad hoc "team" and sign all the logs that day with that team name. Saves space on tiny log sheets and saves time at the cache site. In those cases, each cacher would include in their online log , "Signed Log as Team XYZ" or something to that effect, so their find can be verified if need be.

 

You could go back to your online logs and add "Signed Log as ____________". That would provide verification without having to go back and re-sign all those logs. Just go ahead and use your user name from now on.

 

Personally, I don't go around checking logs in all my caches against the online logs. Most of the time it's easy enough to see online whether a particular cacher found a bunch of caches in my area that day...it's safe to assume that his find on my cache was legitimate. Only once did I go and check, when someone created an account and then logged caches in several different countries on different continents on the same day, including mine. Obviously fake, so I deleted it. But I did check the logsheet first.

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If I find the cache why do I need to sign the log? Is the log reconciled with the online log? Sometimes the log is a tiny piece of paper with tons of scribbles on it, most illegible so it seems a little pointless to sign it. What am I supposed to sign on the log? my geocaching username? time/date?

I suppose the forum regulars were waiting for me to reply since I am known as a contrarian on this issue.

 

Of course you do not have to sign the log.

 

However cache owners may delete online logs that appear to be bogus (in fact the guideline state that this is part of the responsibility of being a cache owner). Therefore some cache owners do reconcile the online log with the contents of the physical cache. My recommendation is to always sign the log if possible and you have any concern that a cache owner might delete your online log.

 

Signing the log gives many cache finders a good feeling that they have indeed found the cache. Sometimes what you think is the cache is not. It could just be some junk lying around, or it may a decoy cache that the cache owner left to distract you from the real cache. By opening the container and reading the physical log, you can have some confidence that you really found the correct container. And you may find that you soon associate the act of even just scribbling your initials in the log as confirmation that you have really found the cache.

 

Some people insist there is a "rule" someplace that says you must sign the log. I don't think I will ever convince these otherwise. Generally they interpret suggestions as rules, or misread guidelines that limit when a cache owner can delete online logs as meaning that if it's not forbidden, the owners should delete logs.

 

However, for most people this is just a fun, lite, activity and most cache owners have no intention of making jump through hoops. If they believe you found the cache they will not delete your logs. People should remember that there is no "winner" in the classic sense and that the "find count" should not be viewed as a score. While a bogus log should be deleted because it may confuse others as to whether the caches is still there or how difficult the hide may be, life is too short to worry about people who fake logs just to get the smiley. Anyone who actually geocaches knows that the fun is in going out and finding the cache, not in sitting at home creating Found It logs online.

Edited by tozainamboku
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Anyone who actually geocaches knows that the fun is in going out and finding the cache, not in sitting at home creating Found It logs online.

 

I'm a big advocate of signing the log. Do I expect or demand everyone to do so? Certainly not.

 

I won't ask you where the fine line is. But there is a point where people are not geocaching and that doesn't seem to be a problem for you.

 

Which I can understand. Okay. Lord knows it's tough enough to argue the particulars.

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I always have and always will sign the log. To me that is one of the core requirements in geocaching. What good is it to go out, find a cache and not sign that you were there? It's no trouble to take out a writing implement and mark the log sheet with your name and date. I enjoy looking at logs to see who came before me. I'm sure there are those that disagree, (tozainamboku) but I play the game the way I was taught and the way I enjoy

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We always sign the logs. One of the biggest joys for us after actually finding the cache is opening it and signing the log. So far we have found two where they were frozen solid and we caouldn't remove or open them to sign the log. We marked as found and will return to sign at the first thaw oppourtunity.

Since we are new it neve occoured to us to do more than sign the physical log...perhaps now we'll add a few comments or tidbits about ourseleves. At least on the ones larger than a rolling paper.

Oh yeah, we are both 5'3" and shorter. Sometime we have to climb or jump to crab the cache, so I kind of resent the implications that size is a hinderance. Besides we don't have to stoop as low to get the under the tree ones. Does that mean Kobe Bryant shouldn't have to grab them and sign?

Edited by CamoriCouple
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I suppose the forum regulars were waiting for me to reply since I am known as a contrarian on this issue.

 

Of course you do not have to sign the log.

 

In the spirit of the adage that deeds matter more than words, let me ask: tozainamboku, when you find a cache, do you sign the log?

 

What if Warwick Davis or Deep Roy found a cache in a 7-foot tree? You can send a picture to the CO if you can't retrieve it, and still get a smilie.

 

If Warwick Davis tries that on any of our caches that require climbing, I'll pop in my Willow DVD and watch it in tribute to his acting career. Then I'll delete his log, because seeing a cache and finding a cache are two different things.

 

Let Warwick Davis worry about Warwick Davis, and let floridabiker1 stop trolling for controversy.

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Wow, that generated LOTS of replies. I'm mostly an urban cacher and the caches I have found are small, there have been 2 that there were no real room in the logs at all, just scraps of paper with chicken scratch. I do notice that cachers carry replacement logs and if I find a word file or something I can print to make a log I will do that. I appears I'm going to have to have a little cache pack. Course I've only found a couple caches. Now if I could only figure out how to delete the two duplicate logs I made. I logged it on my geocaching.com app on the iphone and it didn't post, so I just did it online. Then I figured out how to do it on the iphone...hence, 2 logs. I understand the point of the logging concept, so signing I will go...

 

And seriously, why would anyone sit in front of a computer and say they found it when they didn't even go out there. THat's just silly

Edited by Me&Geppetto
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And seriously, why would anyone sit in front of a computer and say they found it when they didn't even go out there. THat's just silly

I agree. But it happens - a lot.

My other 2/3rds has a hide 30 or so feet in a tree. It was meant for beginners to learn rope climbing, but others have used ladders, free climbed it (with a rope assist) and a couple of kids used what looked like a medievel siege tower they built from local dead wood.

- And we're fine with that. 'Course I had to dismantle their contraption...

But looking up at it and accessing the log are entirely different.

She probably deletes 1/3 of the logs when we (I) go to loosen the straps for tree growth every six Months or so.

Edited by cerberus1
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We have signed all but one log on our finds. The reason I didn't reach my hand in that rocky hole is because there was a giant female black widow in there and she had woven a web all over the tin. It had spider eggs all over it. Upon getting back to do my logging, I read that other finders of that cache had actually been bitten by a spider while retrieving. I recorded the find, and was honest in that I didn't stick my mitts in there for fear of a venomous spider bite. My log hasn't been deleted as of yet.

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Typically cachers sign their username and the date.

 

It proves you found the cache, retrieved it and opened it up versus (for instance) just spotting it in a tree.

 

Not too many years ago most cachers left a little thanks and maybe a tidbit about themselves in most logbooks in the large-ish caches.

 

Some cachers still leave real logs. I see them once in a while and I still do it. It's kind of sad that full logs are no longer part of the game for most. I used to really enjoy paging through the logbooks at the cache site and reading about everyone else's experience. I liked that you could find a cache in the snow and read about someone complaining about the heat and mosquitoes while standing at the same spot.

 

But the chief reason is to show you were there. Some cache owners will reconcile the paper log with the online logs and if there is no corresponding paper log they delete the online log.

 

I've only seen a few caches like that, and they're cool. But I think of the online log as the place to write a little about the experience of finding the cache. For one thing, I'm not all that certain most COs ever visit their caches to read logs but can easily read online logs if they care to. Also, the online logs serve a journal to the extent that I wish to have one. Once in a while I look at caches I've found, and if I don't remember them by the title and location I can usually remember by reading my own log entry.

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The way I see it, if you could not retrieve or open the container by some design of the hider (cache is up a tree, 50 feet up a cliff, or has some kind of tricky puzzle container, for example), then obviously just getting your hands on the cache was part of the challenge. If you couldn't get to it, it's a DNF

 

Conversely, if the log is inaccessible for some other reason than intended (frozen or rusted shut, for example, and forcing it open would damage the container) I'd log a find without having signed the log. And post a NM log on it.

 

I've only come across that situation once and in that case I took a picture of the conainer in my hand as proof I had found it. In my online log I mentioned that I had photo evidence if required, but the CO never questioned it.

 

I also had one cache at a historic old church that I couldn't find, so I logged a DNF. The CO read my log and told me I could log the find if I wanted, his intent was just to bring folks to the site. I thanked him for the offer but I kept my DNF intact.

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The way I see it, if you could not retrieve or open the container by some design of the hider (cache is up a tree, 50 feet up a cliff, or has some kind of tricky puzzle container, for example), then obviously just getting your hands on the cache was part of the challenge. If you couldn't get to it, it's a DNF

 

Conversely, if the log is inaccessible for some other reason than intended (frozen or rusted shut, for example, and forcing it open would damage the container) I'd log a find without having signed the log. And post a NM log on it.

 

Sounds about right to me.

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What if Warwick Davis or Deep Roy found a cache in a 7-foot tree? You can send a picture to the CO if you can't retrieve it, and still get a smilie.

 

If Warwick Davis tries that on any of our caches that require climbing, I'll pop in my Willow DVD and watch it in tribute to his acting career. Then I'll delete his log, because seeing a cache and finding a cache are two different things.

 

Let Warwick Davis worry about Warwick Davis, and let floridabiker1 stop trolling for controversy.

I have seen before in online logs, people say that they didn't have a pen, so they attached a picture of it. Since a picture is valid, you should be able to email a pic to the CO, and claim the find.

 

Also, you did find it just by spotting it. In traditional hide-and-seek, without tagging, if you see the person, you found them. Same thing in Geocaching.

 

Also, I am not trolling. Thank you very much.

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What if Warwick Davis or Deep Roy found a cache in a 7-foot tree? You can send a picture to the CO if you can't retrieve it, and still get a smilie.

 

If Warwick Davis tries that on any of our caches that require climbing, I'll pop in my Willow DVD and watch it in tribute to his acting career. Then I'll delete his log, because seeing a cache and finding a cache are two different things.

 

Let Warwick Davis worry about Warwick Davis, and let floridabiker1 stop trolling for controversy.

I have seen before in online logs, people say that they didn't have a pen, so they attached a picture of it. Since a picture is valid, you should be able to email a pic to the CO, and claim the find.

 

So they attached a picture of "it."

 

What is "it?"

 

Was "it" the log sheet held in their hand?

 

Was "it" the cache held in their hand?

 

I am willing to bet that "it" wasn't a picture of the cache ten feet up a tree.

 

Show me a picture of "it" and let's see what you're talking about.

 

Also, you did find it just by spotting it. In traditional hide-and-seek, without tagging, if you see the person, you found them. Same thing in Geocaching.

 

Don't try to change the subject with me, honeychile. I argue for a living.

 

We're not talking about hide and seek, we're not talking about Red Rover, we're not talking about Monopoly or tiddlywinks or global thermonuclear war. We're talking about geocaching, so let's just talk about geocaching.

 

Let's start with hiding a cache. What do you need to hide a cache?

 

From the guidelines on hiding a cache:

 

3.Geocache Contents

•Geocache containers include a logsheet or logbook.

For all physical caches, there must be a logbook, scroll or other type of log for geocachers to record their visit.

 

So you need a logbook there. Why would that be again?

 

From "Finding Your First Cache"

 

Step 4 – The Actual Find

Hurray! You found your first geocache. Congratulations! Now what?

 

1.Take note of the style and method of this hide. Where did this geocache bring you? Enjoy the location.

2.Sign the logbook with your name, the date, and a few words about your experience.

3.If you trade for items, remember to trade for something that is of equal or greater value.

4.Make sure to seal the cache and place it back exactly where and how you found it. If it had some rocks covering it, please replace those.

5.Use the waypoint you created as a helpful guide for your return.

6.When you get home, log your experience online by going back to that cache page and using the links provided. The cache owner is automatically notified of your log and is always happy to know about your adventure, the condition of their cache, and any environmental factors. Upload photos to share your experience visually with other geocachers.

 

And lest we forget, from the newsletter that came out in early February:

 

From the last newsletter:

1) Bring a Pen - There are few rules in the game. But one rule is that you need to sign the logbook.

 

Does that help clear things up?

Edited by hzoi
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What if Warwick Davis or Deep Roy found a cache in a 7-foot tree? You can send a picture to the CO if you can't retrieve it, and still get a smilie.

 

If Warwick Davis tries that on any of our caches that require climbing, I'll pop in my Willow DVD and watch it in tribute to his acting career. Then I'll delete his log, because seeing a cache and finding a cache are two different things.

 

Let Warwick Davis worry about Warwick Davis, and let floridabiker1 stop trolling for controversy.

I have seen before in online logs, people say that they didn't have a pen, so they attached a picture of it. Since a picture is valid, you should be able to email a pic to the CO, and claim the find.

 

Also, you did find it just by spotting it. In traditional hide-and-seek, without tagging, if you see the person, you found them. Same thing in Geocaching.

 

Also, I am not trolling. Thank you very much.

 

So you are saying that the "rules of traditional hide-and-seek" apply to Geocaching? Yeah, I think I remember Dave Ulmer saying in the recent podcast that his idea was to hide something so others could come look at it ohh.gif

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What if Warwick Davis or Deep Roy found a cache in a 7-foot tree? You can send a picture to the CO if you can't retrieve it, and still get a smilie.

 

If Warwick Davis tries that on any of our caches that require climbing, I'll pop in my Willow DVD and watch it in tribute to his acting career. Then I'll delete his log, because seeing a cache and finding a cache are two different things.

 

Let Warwick Davis worry about Warwick Davis, and let floridabiker1 stop trolling for controversy.

I have seen before in online logs, people say that they didn't have a pen, so they attached a picture of it. Since a picture is valid, you should be able to email a pic to the CO, and claim the find.

 

So they attached a picture of "it."

 

What is "it?"

 

Was "it" the log sheet held in their hand?

 

Was "it" the cache held in their hand?

 

I am willing to bet that "it" wasn't a picture of the cache ten feet up a tree.

 

Show me a picture of "it" and let's see what you're talking about.

 

Also, you did find it just by spotting it. In traditional hide-and-seek, without tagging, if you see the person, you found them. Same thing in Geocaching.

 

Don't try to change the subject with me, honeychile. I argue for a living.

 

We're not talking about hide and seek, we're not talking about Red Rover, we're not talking about Monopoly or tiddlywinks or global thermonuclear war. We're talking about geocaching, so let's just talk about geocaching.

 

Let's start with hiding a cache. What do you need to hide a cache?

 

From the guidelines on hiding a cache:

 

3.Geocache Contents

•Geocache containers include a logsheet or logbook.

For all physical caches, there must be a logbook, scroll or other type of log for geocachers to record their visit.

 

So you need a logbook there. Why would that be again?

 

From "Finding Your First Cache"

 

Step 4 – The Actual Find

Hurray! You found your first geocache. Congratulations! Now what?

 

1.Take note of the style and method of this hide. Where did this geocache bring you? Enjoy the location.

2.Sign the logbook with your name, the date, and a few words about your experience.

3.If you trade for items, remember to trade for something that is of equal or greater value.

4.Make sure to seal the cache and place it back exactly where and how you found it. If it had some rocks covering it, please replace those.

5.Use the waypoint you created as a helpful guide for your return.

6.When you get home, log your experience online by going back to that cache page and using the links provided. The cache owner is automatically notified of your log and is always happy to know about your adventure, the condition of their cache, and any environmental factors. Upload photos to share your experience visually with other geocachers.

 

And lest we forget, from the newsletter that came out in early February:

 

From the last newsletter:

1) Bring a Pen - There are few rules in the game. But one rule is that you need to sign the logbook.

 

Does that help clear things up?

 

Well reasoned, counselor. I see no room for rebuttal. :D

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I was not aware of needing to sign your user name from here. I am usually with the kids and they sign and date the cache. I guess I need to go back to the few we have found and add my user name..hmmmm

 

I wouldn't worry too much about it - my kids do that as well on the odd occasion they come out with me. They signed a bunch as Team Pander last year iirc. I've never been challenged on such things but could explain why there was an odd name if required.

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The way I see it, if you could not retrieve or open the container by some design of the hider (cache is up a tree, 50 feet up a cliff, or has some kind of tricky puzzle container, for example), then obviously just getting your hands on the cache was part of the challenge. If you couldn't get to it, it's a DNF

 

Conversely, if the log is inaccessible for some other reason than intended (frozen or rusted shut, for example, and forcing it open would damage the container) I'd log a find without having signed the log. And post a NM log on it.

 

Sounds about right to me.

 

I would still log that frozen or rusted shut cache as a DNF. If possible, I will come back another time to find it again and sign the log.

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For those tiny caches, I sign PI or P.Iti and mention that in my online log. I don't date the physical log.

I won't claim on online find if I don't sign the log. If I see the cache but can't get it, I'll write a note explaining my short stature, lack of athletic ability, the fact that there is a "y" in the day of the week we're caching....

Just be prepared for some online logs to be deleted if you haven't left your mark. There's no shame in being unable to get a cache to sign the log, plenty more caches that you will be able to, and get your smiley.

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I have take pics of Caches and send to the cache owner and ask if i can log as a found

and in all case have been give the Ok. on one cache it was 3 years after found it the first time

I was passing and the place was close and no one was around so I call in to sign the Log Book

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I have take pics of Caches and send to the cache owner and ask if i can log as a found

and in all case have been give the Ok. on one cache it was 3 years after found it the first time

I was passing and the place was close and no one was around so I call in to sign the Log Book

 

You can afford a camera and and internet connection but not a pen? Oh, the cruel irony.

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There must be some real uptight cache owners out there. Like I said elsewhere...I tried to care, but I just don't think it's worth the effort. If someone insists on cheating the system and claiming a find on something they didn't actually find, that's there sad, sad business. If they found the cache itself, that's a find and I really have no problem with them claiming it as one even if they didn't sign it. If they, for some reason, could not sign it (cache stuck closed, log soaked and unsignable), I absolutely don't care if they claim it as a find and don't sign...I would just hope they'd tell me so I could rectify it and do some maintenance.

 

That being said, I absolutely think it's right and proper to sign the log. I do every chance I get. Sometimes the log is so crammed full or degraded I know there is no way the owner is checking or even COULD reconcile the paper and online logs. I still do. That's how I believe the game should be played and that's how I play. Just seems a little petty to delete someone's log unless there is something about it that is either blatantly wrong ("log-bombing" every cache in an area, for instance), offensive, or has a spoiler that ruins the whole cache for anyone else.

 

If someone feels like having a higher number next to their name makes them a cooler person...well, I sort of have to pity that person. That and two bucks will buy 'em a coffee.

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