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How to Deal with Police While Geocaching

 

There have been several recent posts about dealing with police while Geocaching. As a police officer, I'm going to share a few pointers that may help make your interaction with law enforcement a little smoother, and help you educate police in your jurisdiction about Geocaching.

 

There are two main points to keep in mind while dealing with law enforcement:

 

1. Geocaching is not illegal.

 

2. Not all police officers know point #1.

 

Geocaching is not illegal. We know that. But the police officer who just saw you duck behind a guard rail, disappear behind a building or appear to grab and conceal something in your hand doesn't realize that. As police officers, we are trained to look for and investigate suspicious behavior. And someone poking around behind a utility box is inherently suspicious. Someone parking on the side of a highway and leaving his vehicle to go uphill is suspicious. And someone leaving a small bottle underneath a lamp skirt is obviously suspicious.

 

Many of the above actions could also be utilized by people looking to conceal or pick up drugs or other contraband. This is the first thought in a police officer's mind. Not that someone is playing a hide-and-seek game. So please keep this in mind when a police officer contacts you and asks what you are doing.

 

Tips to handle a police contact:

 

1. Be courteous. Remember that the police officer contacting you is DOING HIS JOB. It is our job to contact people that are being suspicious or look out of place. Remember that old "Golden Rule." It really applies here. Remember that police officers are also concerned about their safety. Keep your hands visible, don't dig into a bag until instructed to do so, and follow instructions.

 

2. Be mindful of the relevant laws. Although Geocaching is legal, you may be parked illegally, close to a trespassing sign, or violating a city ordinance.

 

2. Explain what you are doing. I realize the police officer is probably a "muggle." But at this point, being evasive and telling him you are conducting a barn owl census is probably not going to fly. (pun intended)

 

3. Carry a copy of the Geocaching brochure to give to the police officer. (http://www.geocaching.com/articles/Brochures/EN/EN_Geocaching_BROCHURE.pdf) Or, if you have the resources to print it, print the Guide for Parks and Law Enforcement, available here: http://www.geocaching.com/articles/parksandpolice/GuideForParksandLawEnforcement.pdf

 

4. Show him your GPS, the cache (if you found it), and other tools so he can see that it really is innocent.

 

5. And lastly, if the police officer tells you to leave, do it. You may not be doing anything wrong, but it's better to avoid more scrutiny than create an issue on the spot. You can always contact the law enforcement agency later and share the information above in order to better educate your police department.

 

Protecting your cache from the bomb squad:

 

1. Think about where you are going to place the cache, and be aware of any obvious security concerns. Placing your cache just outside a government building, bank or large gathering place (ie. a stadium) is a sure fire way to get the bomb squad called out.

 

2. Be sure your cache is prominently labeled. The official Geocaching sticker, or just writing "Official Geocache, learn more at Geocaching.com" can mean the difference between a police officer looking closely and the death of your cache container by water cannon.

 

3. Have the permission of the land owner. Police should be contacting the land owner to determine if the object is known about.

 

4. If your cache is going to be electrical, battery powered, contain wires, etc., contact your local law enforcement agency and let them know about it. Provide photos and the exact location. Offer to show it to a representative of the agency.

 

5. Provide your contact information on or inside the cache. An email address should suffice.

 

Hopefully these tips help avoid or minimize uncomfortable encounters with Police. Happy caching!

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Or another suggestion our local police has a cache maybe get the police involved its right in front of there office

 

Some do. The Sedona (Arizona) Police Department placed one in their lobby. (http://coord.info/GC45297) It's a great idea. But some agencies just won't play along with it. And that's fine. My post was directed towards Geocachers and what we can do to make those inevitable police contacts go a little bit smoother.

Edited by blackhorse221
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5. And lastly, if the police officer tells you to leave, do it. You may not be doing anything wrong, but it's better to avoid more scrutiny than create an issue on the spot. You can always contact the law enforcement agency later and share the information above in order to better educate your police department.

 

I hate this last piece of advice. I understand where you are coming from, but citizens need to be aware of their rights. Too many police abuse their power and push people around because they're the ones with the badge, the authority, and the gun. If you are on public property and you are not doing anything illegal, you have no obligation to leave. The police need to have a reason to arrest you and standing on or looking around on public property is not enough. Too often people just give in to the abusive instructions of an ignorant police officer. (now, keep in mind, just because the law will have your back in a courtroom will not make your day any better if the angry cop decides to bring you downtown or taze you for your attitude)

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5. And lastly, if the police officer tells you to leave, do it. You may not be doing anything wrong, but it's better to avoid more scrutiny than create an issue on the spot. You can always contact the law enforcement agency later and share the information above in order to better educate your police department.

 

I hate this last piece of advice. I understand where you are coming from, but citizens need to be aware of their rights. Too many police abuse their power and push people around because they're the ones with the badge, the authority, and the gun. If you are on public property and you are not doing anything illegal, you have no obligation to leave. The police need to have a reason to arrest you and standing on or looking around on public property is not enough. Too often people just give in to the abusive instructions of an ignorant police officer. (now, keep in mind, just because the law will have your back in a courtroom will not make your day any better if the angry cop decides to bring you downtown or taze you for your attitude)

 

If the police officer is wrong, your best bet would be to take it up with his superior, town manager, mayor ect. Argue with him and its defiant trespass, leading to resisting arrest. At that point you won't have anything to say to anyone. Leave without issue, and then contact internal affairs.

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Rather than the large-size, verbose, graphically-intensive pamphlets, I carry around a stack of What Is Geocaching folding cards:

 

675e8cfd-7985-4f58-afa7-7b17ed79a55e.png

 

Here's a link to download a PDF version formatted for double-sided printing:

 

What Is Geocaching Folding Card

 

This has proved effective in the past, as shown by this log:

 

Dashing out from work to grab this one before our office xmas party tonite.

 

Accurate coordinates made for a quick find of this uniquely-hidden container whose contents were in excellent condition.

 

I must have looked suspicious while attempting to shield the container and log while signing as a policecar rolled up right behind me. I tried to explain what I was doing and I got back "I don't even know what language you are speaking" Handed him a "What is Geocaching" folding card and showed him the container and log, and all was well.

 

Took nothing, left same and signed the log.

 

Thanks!

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I hate this last piece of advice. I understand where you are coming from, but citizens need to be aware of their rights. Too many police abuse their power and push people around because they're the ones with the badge, the authority, and the gun. If you are on public property and you are not doing anything illegal, you have no obligation to leave. The police need to have a reason to arrest you and standing on or looking around on public property is not enough. Too often people just give in to the abusive instructions of an ignorant police officer. (now, keep in mind, just because the law will have your back in a courtroom will not make your day any better if the angry cop decides to bring you downtown or taze you for your attitude)

 

This post isn't intended to become an argument about civil rights and police not understanding the law. I'm in full agreement that not every police officer is as versed in the law as they should be. The post is intended as a basic guide, especially for newer cachers, on how to make police contact go a little smoother.

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Rather than the large-size, verbose, graphically-intensive pamphlets, I carry around a stack of What Is Geocaching folding cards:

 

This has proved effective in the past, as shown by this log:

 

Dashing out from work to grab this one before our office xmas party tonite.

 

Accurate coordinates made for a quick find of this uniquely-hidden container whose contents were in excellent condition.

 

I must have looked suspicious while attempting to shield the container and log while signing as a policecar rolled up right behind me. I tried to explain what I was doing and I got back "I don't even know what language you are speaking" Handed him a "What is Geocaching" folding card and showed him the container and log, and all was well.

 

Took nothing, left same and signed the log.

 

Thanks!

 

I had a similar scenario. I had just replaced the container for a cache that was located in a small residential park that has a real nice view of our town and turned around to see a LEO pulling into the small parking lot. As I walked back to my vehicle he waved me over to his vehicle and asked, "what were you hiding over there?" I told him that I was geocaching, showed him my GPS and the little treasure chest on the screen, but he still didn't quite get it. I had a geocaching flyer in my swag bag and showed it to him. He looked it over quickly and said, "this looks like fun. The reason that I questioned you was that the park is often used by kids to park and smoke some pot."

 

When I thought about it later, I *was* in fact hiding something and I could definitely see how that would look suspicious.

 

As someone suggested earlier the answer to "replying to police contacts" can be summed up in two words: be honest.

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Thanks for your post - I thought it was very informative and well-written :)

 

We've only run into police officers once and they were looking for someone else and just wanted to know if we had seen them. We said no, just out here geocaching. One officer knew, the other didn't. The one that knew told his partner it was just a "GPS treasure hunt game".

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I've been stopped so many times while caching that it seems like a normal part of the game any more. My favorite was the very first time. Seems I was reported as 'a man with a gun'.

 

Sooo...There we sat, bored, when up pops a brand new cache! We decided to give it a shot for the FTF. I got the email at 7:34 and we got in the car at 8:01. Stopped at Willy Farms for snacks and smokes so had to be about 8:20 or so when we got to the park. As I was searching for leg 1 a local resident came out with his dog. We talked pleasantly for a few minutes, "Hi, how are ya? Nice weather." that kind of thing. The guy takes his dog in the house and I get back to work. Next thing I know there is a patrol car pulling up. The young lady jumps out of the car and looks at me like I am some kinda nut, could be because I was laughing by the time she got out of the car. I was thinking "Hey, Cool, my first run in with the law while geocaching!" She asks me "Have you got a gun?! I said "UM,NO! I have a flashlight and a gps receiver." Then she asks "What are you doing?"Meanwhile the patrol cars just keep coming. By the time all was said and done we had 6 marked Buffalo cop cars on site, and six of Buffalo's finest all laughing. The worst they did was a quick pat down that could not have found a howitzer in my pocket if I had one, and ran my plates. They never even asked for any ID. I keep telling myself not to go on these night time FTF runs, but I never listen to me. Hey, it ain't like it was midnight or sum thing. I guess we will have to come back to this one as we decided not to take the officers up on the offer to help us look for an item we couldn't even describe to them.

Thanks for the fun.

 

The last time, a couple days ago, the officer already knew what geocaching was. He did seem interested that I had an app on my phone and surprised that just anyone could hide a cache. But otherwise it was just routine.

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Good points,

A local cacher got arrested after residents of nearby houses got suspicious as this guy parked his big 4x4 full of work tools, started mucking around with GPS, got a big backpack (it was a long hike in to the cache) and started packing it full of GPS, hiking pole, etc. It was a very hot total fire ban day and local residents thought he was going to light a bushfire! I've never had a visit from the police but I'm sure one day I might!

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Good points,

A local cacher got arrested after residents of nearby houses got suspicious as this guy parked his big 4x4 full of work tools, started mucking around with GPS, got a big backpack (it was a long hike in to the cache) and started packing it full of GPS, hiking pole, etc. It was a very hot total fire ban day and local residents thought he was going to light a bushfire! I've never had a visit from the police but I'm sure one day I might!

Got arrested for what?

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Always be honest when dealing with an LEO.

Definitely.

 

I had put out a cache for an event last year. The cache was located in a tree down an embankment in the grassy area of a large interchange.

 

I had just happened to stop by to clean up the log roll as I had put too much paper in it and it was getting really messed up from all the visits.

As I am heading back up the hill to my car, there is a police cruiser parked behind my car.

 

I carefully approached the officer and explained what I was doing when he asked.

He was aware of geocaching and actually recommended a place where I could move it to.

 

He said that someone had called in about people being down the bank.

I was told that the area within the interchange was off limits (even though other caches in the area exist in even busier interchanges).

He asked me to remove the cache, so I walked back down and retrieved the cache.

 

I disabled the cache via the app on my phone while in my car and archived it when I got home.

Edited by BlackRose67
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I hate this last piece of advice. I understand where you are coming from, but citizens need to be aware of their rights. Too many police abuse their power and push people around because they're the ones with the badge, the authority, and the gun. If you are on public property and you are not doing anything illegal, you have no obligation to leave. The police need to have a reason to arrest you and standing on or looking around on public property is not enough. Too often people just give in to the abusive instructions of an ignorant police officer. (now, keep in mind, just because the law will have your back in a courtroom will not make your day any better if the angry cop decides to bring you downtown or taze you for your attitude)

 

If a police officer asks me to leave, I'm leaving!

 

If they TELL me to leave, I'm leaving even faster!! :o

 

I'm just not going to get into a civil rights argument/discussion over a stupid geocache.

I may be in the right, but I'm not willing to spend three hours down at the station house proving it. (in such a case)

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If a police officer asks me to leave, I'm leaving!

 

If they TELL me to leave, I'm leaving even faster!! :o

 

I'm just not going to get into a civil rights argument/discussion over a stupid geocache.

I may be in the right, but I'm not willing to spend three hours down at the station house proving it. (in such a case)

 

I think it's when I see logs like this one that I get the most bothered:

 

yikes. WHAT a terrible encounter with the police at this cache. the worst i've ever had. let me just preface this by saying i am in no way making this out to be the CO's fault for placing a cache here. out with scottberks on a night run and we really wanted to grab this one. very cool (although a sad and gruesome) bit of history here and we thought it'd be neat to find an urban ammo and that we'd make quick work of this one, especially with no one around at the early hour. wrong! be began our search and after only a minute or so two police officers came running up to us with their guns pulled- WHOA! they wanted to know what we were doing and we began explaining geocaching to them. they didn't believe us. the one cop kept calling us morons for being out in the rain (it was really only drizzling at this point, but whatever) and the other kept asking us 'so WHAT's supposed to be in this ammo can again?' and didn't like or believe our continued response of the usual 'logbook and trinkets' schpeel. he accused us of searching for a stash of heroin or crack and we had to stand outside in the cold and rain while he ran our licenses and scott's plate, while the other officer checked scott's car and stood outside with us making snide remarks about how we were idiots, liars, not welcome in chicago, and needed to go back to the suburbs where we came from. it was unfortunate we weren't able to continue the search for the cache because if we had found it, it would've been much easier to prove that we weren't criminals. i couldn't believe how much of jerks these guys were being to us. they said they 'almost had to call the marine corps in' because if one of us 'fell in the river' it would have turned into a 'military operation involving helicopters and a search party.' we were almost arrested, but given our ID's back and told to get out of chicago. needless to say our night run was over at this point. seriously, this was a real bummer. i'll be back but not if there's a slight chance THAT is going to happen again. TFTH anyway.

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Yikes, tallgaloot! Maybe come to Canada. The Police are nice here.

 

Thanks, OP, for the great post.

 

It's been my observation that how "nice" your local police are is a direct result of how severe your crime problem is. Police in upscale suburban areas can afford to be polite and listen to your explanation, because they are used to dealing with a population that is primarily honest. Police in high-crime areas (like, in the above example, inner city Chicago) are used to being lied to and taking suspicious-looking characters at their word can be fatal. I'd understand if they seem a little paranoid and remain suspicious after being given an explanation that just doesn't add up (in their experience)

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Several years ago we had a chemical plant leak vinyl tetra chloride and my agency and locals moved in to get people moved out of the area. Can't see it, couldn't smell it but it was a major leak. 5 died in the explosion. After we thought we had the area evacuated and secured a guy who "knew his rights" decided he was going to go thru the area anyway. Senior guy, it was me who went after him as I wasn't going to let my people in a hazard area. Got him stopped and told him he had to leave. Nope, he knew his rights, he wasn't leaving, I couldn't make him, etc. I told him about the vinyl tetra chloride leak and he wouldn't listen. All he wanted to do is shout and rant about the government taking away people's rights, etc. I wasn't staying in the hot zone any longer to argue with this clown who "knew his rights". He came out.

When I was commanding a drug task force we had followed a drug mule from the border and were set up to take him and his team down when they made the transfer. It was a fairly remote area and we had innocents out of the way until one came home. These were some bad actors, known always to be armed and with a group not afraid to shoot. Without trying to be too obvious and being as inconspicuous and quiet as possible one of the team tried to get the homeowner to immediately leave. Nope, he wanted to argue his rights and how the government is trampling on the honest man.

Moral is you may think you don't have to move but then most likely you aren't aware of everything going on in the area and the police don't have to tell you if there's danger near by. There could be a whole lot more going on that you're aware. Protecting people from harm and their own stupidity is often harder than the public is aware.

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Several years ago we had a chemical plant leak vinyl tetra chloride and my agency and locals moved in to get people moved out of the area. Can't see it, couldn't smell it but it was a major leak. 5 died in the explosion. After we thought we had the area evacuated and secured a guy who "knew his rights" decided he was going to go thru the area anyway. Senior guy, it was me who went after him as I wasn't going to let my people in a hazard area. Got him stopped and told him he had to leave. Nope, he knew his rights, he wasn't leaving, I couldn't make him, etc. I told him about the vinyl tetra chloride leak and he wouldn't listen. All he wanted to do is shout and rant about the government taking away people's rights, etc. I wasn't staying in the hot zone any longer to argue with this clown who "knew his rights". He came out.

When I was commanding a drug task force we had followed a drug mule from the border and were set up to take him and his team down when they made the transfer. It was a fairly remote area and we had innocents out of the way until one came home. These were some bad actors, known always to be armed and with a group not afraid to shoot. Without trying to be too obvious and being as inconspicuous and quiet as possible one of the team tried to get the homeowner to immediately leave. Nope, he wanted to argue his rights and how the government is trampling on the honest man.

Moral is you may think you don't have to move but then most likely you aren't aware of everything going on in the area and the police don't have to tell you if there's danger near by. There could be a whole lot more going on that you're aware. Protecting people from harm and their own stupidity is often harder than the public is aware.

Depends on the state. In some states both of these individuals had a right to stay where they were (No matter how reckless or stupid that is).

Some states can require a "mandatory" evcuation for fire, police, medical, etc emergencies.

 

But, I don't think any of use were talking about that. I was talking about cops who just don't understand what you're doing and in brusque, irritated cop mode tell someone who is completely within their rights on public property to "get lost", "move along" or (in the previous example) "Get out of Chicago."

 

In short I'm talking about cops who are jerks. :(

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Reading some of the above makes me glad I live in England. Yeah, some of our cops are jerks, but very few carry firearms so the worst that's likely to happen is that I'll be subject to some heavy sarcasm.

I've heard that British sarcasm can be tougher on you than a gun! ;)

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I hate this last piece of advice. I understand where you are coming from, but citizens need to be aware of their rights. Too many police abuse their power and push people around because they're the ones with the badge, the authority, and the gun. If you are on public property and you are not doing anything illegal, you have no obligation to leave. The police need to have a reason to arrest you and standing on or looking around on public property is not enough. Too often people just give in to the abusive instructions of an ignorant police officer. (now, keep in mind, just because the law will have your back in a courtroom will not make your day any better if the angry cop decides to bring you downtown or taze you for your attitude)

 

I understand what you are saying, and I disagree with your conclusion. Police officers are people just like you or I. There are good ones and bad ones. Hopefully the screening process that takes place when police officers are recruited and trained will cull out those that are prone to abuseive behavior. However, if you do encounter the rare exception, remember that s/he will likely write your arrest report in such a manner to make their actions perfectly justifiable to the judge. They know the process a lot better than we do. I for one am not willing to take an arrest record just to prove I am correct. Smileys are not that important to me. If I were to encounter an abusive officer, (which has never happend to me) I would mentally note their name/badge number, the date, time and place of the encounter. I would email the department with this information and a description of the encounter and what I feel they did that was incorrect. One report is certainly not going to end a career, (as it shouldn't) unless its one of several such reports. I believe Police departments want to ensure their liabilities are minimized and their staff is acting in an appropriate manner.

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When you have a bad encounter with cops NAIL them! I have known a number of guys who went through cop school here in Minnesota they came out with this attitude.

The police are your lord master snd god. The police are the supperior of the people. Even though I have read the books that they are required to read.

That say that the people are the supperior of the police. One of those students quoted me this. The citizen is required to kneel before the police and say AHH! when they unzip.

I tried to get him removed and a drive by was performed on my house by a cop. He faild to get his target, then a death threat was put on my head by that and other cops.

Upon reporting it I was told that nothing would be done because all cops stick up for all cops no matter the criminal behavior. As a result any time I see a cop I am ready for war.

There are only a very small handfull of cops that I trust. I do not have an arrest record, I have been stopped by Anoka acounty deputies who refused to give identification. Upon reporting this

I was told that the Anoka county sheriff approves of his deputies behavior. We the peolpe are the supperiors, any and all questionable or unlawfull acts should be reported and all bad cops removed and jailed.

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But, I don't think any of use were talking about that. I was talking about cops who just don't understand what you're doing and in brusque, irritated cop mode tell someone who is completely within their rights on public property to "get lost", "move along" or (in the previous example) "Get out of Chicago."

 

In short I'm talking about cops who are jerks. :(

 

I can assure you most non-LEOs don't have a clue about what is legal and what they can and can't be forced to comply with. They get their entire legal knowledge watching some TV show, talking to their equally uninformed friends for opinions, or they just believe the voices in their heads. They don't know the law and sure have no knowledge of USSC rulings. In fact very few people have any legal training yet many think they're some kind of legal expert. That gets them in to trouble and then they can't understand why.

We've seen quite a few opinions in this very thread from very uninformed individuals and go quite contrary to legal rulings. Shows that what some people think can't be done is well within the law.

You act like a jerk then expect to be treated like a jerk.

Again, it's not like you know everything going on around you nor do you have any idea why it might be in your best interest and safety if told it's time to leave. It could be someone overstepping their authority or it could be you're in a dangerous location and it is in you safety concern to move.

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Regardless.... it's always entertaining to hear (read) the single-sided story. That's usually what we get here in the forums.

 

Ya know... there are two sides to every story. Just like a coin. Be it from the confronted person, or the LEO, it's one-sided.

.... and a story is just that -- a story.

 

Now, where did I put that salt shaker...?

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I can assure you most non-LEOs don't have a clue about what is legal and what they can and can't be forced to comply with. They get their entire legal knowledge watching some TV show, talking to their equally uninformed friends for opinions, or they just believe the voices in their heads.

Or, you know, law school...

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I'll bet the OP didn't expect this thread to take this turn. :anicute: My eyes have really been opened in just the last two weeks or so that there are some people that have serious problems with law enforcement out there. Interesting post, Mn-treker, and I have no reason to doubt anything you posted. Add to that some of the posts in the "bomb scare" thread from Mansfield, Ohio, one of which that sticks in my head from a military cacher who talked about "putting bacon in it's place", and several "dirty cop" threads started by Swine Flew at a different forum. I seriously had no idea such sentiments were common.

 

Somewhat of a disclaimer: I am the son of a deceased career Police officer, although neither myself, nor my 2 brothers entered the field. He was pretty happy that two of us served in the Army though. I've always thought there was somewhat of a bond between the military and law enforcement. Which makes the "putting bacon in it's place" comment by a military cacher somewhat confusing. :huh: Oh well, carry on.

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I'll bet the OP didn't expect this thread to take this turn. :anicute: My eyes have really been opened in just the last two weeks or so that there are some people that have serious problems with law enforcement out there. Interesting post, Mn-treker, and I have no reason to doubt anything you posted. Add to that some of the posts in the "bomb scare" thread from Mansfield, Ohio, one of which that sticks in my head from a military cacher who talked about "putting bacon in it's place", and several "dirty cop" threads started by Swine Flew at a different forum. I seriously had no idea such sentiments were common.

 

Somewhat of a disclaimer: I am the son of a deceased career Police officer, although neither myself, nor my 2 brothers entered the field. He was pretty happy that two of us served in the Army though. I've always thought there was somewhat of a bond between the military and law enforcement. Which makes the "putting bacon in it's place" comment by a military cacher somewhat confusing. :huh: Oh well, carry on.

I think with the advent of sites like YouTube and cameras that are inconspicuously inside of your phone, more and more people are capturing abusive/crooked/criminal cops on film and of course the media reports these (because people find them interesting) and it is only once in a while that we see a piece about a cop who gives a homeless man a pair of shoes, for example. I think this has led to a turn in the public perception of cops. Are these situations out of the ordinary? Sure. But I think it shocks people to see someone that has been put in the public trust to abuse it so horrendously sometimes, and on film. I'm sure this type of thing has been around since the invention of law enforcement, but now almost nightly people are exposed to a grainy cell phone or dash cam showing behavior unbecoming of a police officer. The public's opinion of law enforcement sinks a little more each time they see a cop beat up an unarmed civilian, write a bogus ticket, shove a 16 year old and call him a "mutt" and so on. Are most police officers great guys? I'm sure they are, but unfortunately there's no news story proclaiming : "this just in! joe nice guy cop didn't lose his temper at a belligerent motorist!"

 

(also- some of the attitude from some of these guys (I think) is regarding their second amendment rights and carry laws.

Edited by tallgaloot
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I'll bet the OP didn't expect this thread to take this turn. :anicute: My eyes have really been opened in just the last two weeks or so that there are some people that have serious problems with law enforcement out there. Interesting post, Mn-treker, and I have no reason to doubt anything you posted. Add to that some of the posts in the "bomb scare" thread from Mansfield, Ohio, one of which that sticks in my head from a military cacher who talked about "putting bacon in it's place", and several "dirty cop" threads started by Swine Flew at a different forum. I seriously had no idea such sentiments were common.

 

Somewhat of a disclaimer: I am the son of a deceased career Police officer, although neither myself, nor my 2 brothers entered the field. He was pretty happy that two of us served in the Army though. I've always thought there was somewhat of a bond between the military and law enforcement. Which makes the "putting bacon in it's place" comment by a military cacher somewhat confusing. :huh: Oh well, carry on.

I think with the advent of sites like YouTube and cameras that are inconspicuously inside of your phone, more and more people are capturing abusive/crooked/criminal cops on film and of course the media reports these (because people find them interesting) and it is only once in a while that we see a piece about a cop who gives a homeless man a pair of shoes, for example. I think this has led to a turn in the public perception of cops. Are these situations out of the ordinary? Sure. But I think it shocks people to see someone that has been put in the public trust to abuse it so horrendously sometimes, and on film. I'm sure this type of thing has been around since the invention of law enforcement, but now almost nightly people are exposed to a grainy cell phone or dash cam showing behavior unbecoming of a police officer. The public's opinion of law enforcement sinks a little more each time they see a cop beat up an unarmed civilian, write a bogus ticket, shove a 16 year old and call him a "mutt" and so on. Are most police officers great guys? I'm sure they are, but unfortunately there's no news story proclaiming : "this just in! joe nice guy cop didn't lose his temper at a belligerent motorist!"

 

(also- some of the attitude from some of these guys (I think) is regarding their second amendment rights and carry laws.

 

That makes sense to me. Interesting to note that the average Geocacher is middle-aged, average age late 30's or early 40's, if I remember correctly. Groundspeak has released that information. We're almost all caucasian, that's obvious, even if they haven't officially released that information. In other words, we're not a bunch of meth heads, I'm sure they all despise law enforcement. :lol:

Edited by Mr.Yuck
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That makes sense to me. Interesting to note that the average Geocacher is middle-aged, average age late 30's or early 40's, if I remember correctly. Groundspeak has released that information. We're almost all caucasian, that's obvious, even if they haven't officially released that information. In other words, we're not a bunch of meth heads, I'm sure they all despise law enforcement. :lol:

 

However, the word "geo-police" is rather common and demonstrates a negative attitude towards law enforcement. With all the coins turning up missing, I'm sure that some may be grabbed by meth head cachers. It has happened only a few times, but I have ran into other cachers obviously under the influence of some kind of speed such as coke, crank or meth.

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I think the outcome of any encounter with a stranger,

has so much to do with your own attitude too,

 

a little advice : be friendly, be helpfull, talk nice and polite

no matter what the other person say or do,

it does not matter it he is a homeless or a cob or the president, just be nice to all.

 

we also had a few cob enconters while caching too,

we always end as best friends with the cobs, so no problems to repport from here :-)

 

lets get back on track : Thanks for the very nice start of this thread,

good intentions and a few very good advices.

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That makes sense to me. Interesting to note that the average Geocacher is middle-aged, average age late 30's or early 40's, if I remember correctly. Groundspeak has released that information. We're almost all caucasian, that's obvious, even if they haven't officially released that information. In other words, we're not a bunch of meth heads, I'm sure they all despise law enforcement. :lol:

 

However, the word "geo-police" is rather common and demonstrates a negative attitude towards law enforcement. With all the coins turning up missing, I'm sure that some may be grabbed by meth head cachers. It has happened only a few times, but I have ran into other cachers obviously under the influence of some kind of speed such as coke, crank or meth.

 

Thank you, resident comedian. :laughing: This gives me a chance to explain myself though, I wasn't very clear. I was trying to say I was suprised at probably at least a half dozen pretty extreme anti-cop sentiments in multiple threads in just a couple weeks. And the average Geocacher is a middle-aged white person, and it was mildly surprising to see such extreme anti-cop sentiments from that demographic. Then of course I went on to say middle aged white people are generally not meth heads, who definitely exhibit anti-cop sentiments.

 

Or something like that. :lol:

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