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Mike & Jess

Backcountry Hammock tenting

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It's been a while, and although I'm not involved with geocaching anymore, I'm still heavy into the backpacking (and was perswaded to lead a packpack weekend geo event).

 

Anyway, looking to pull the trigger and pick up a new hammock for backpack camping.

I've been looking at the more expensive enclosed ones (bug mess) as well as the lesser expensive ones like the ENO Double Deluxe hammocks.

 

I'm kind of leaning towards the ENO hammocks as I can get two for the price of one of the others, and simply carry a small tarp as a rain fly (which I always have the tarp with me anyway).

 

Between the Hennessy hammocks (style) and the ENO hammocks which are pretty standard hammocks, who has used either, and what where the good and bad about them?

 

The ENO I am looking at is this one;

enodoubledeluxe_tomkha_LRG.jpg

 

The Hennessay hammock is this guy (or similar)

4015-432_NOC02_view1_1000x1000.jpg

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Last year I bought a warbonnet blackbird hammock. I used it for a three week hike in Maine on the Appalachian Trail. It's more comfortable than sleeping on the ground but be aware that you will need an underquilt or insulated pad in any temperature below 60 degrees. Check out the Hammock Forum for more info.

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I have an Eno single nest. I don't like that you hang in a banana shape. My knees killed me by morning from being bent back. If I were to buy an Eno for sleeping I'd go with the Double Nest. The extra material would allow me to sleep diagonally on the hammock so I'm flat.

 

This spring my wife and I bought two Warbonnet Blackbirds and love them. They let you sleep diagonally and flat. My wife has a bad back and she sleeps better in the blackbird than she does in our bed.

 

I know a few people who bought Hennesseys and didn't care much for them. I have no first hand experience with a Hennessy.

 

Here is our setup during a canoe camping trip this spring. Blackbird on left and Eno on right. I used the Eno because we were waiting for my Blackbird to be delivered. Warbonnet is a one man operation and he makes each hammock by hand. If you order a setup he doesn't have in stock he has to make it for ya.

 

I agree with John, if you want an opinion on hammocks go to the hammock forum. Those people don't just talk hammocks, they live them.

 

 

462528_3451669643493_1716915559_o.jpg

 

and her are our his n hers Blackbirds

 

288020_3930983746046_664932719_o.jpg

Edited by briansnat

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Nice pics Brian!

Your second pic is a good example of the only time I'd consider a hammock.

Heavy brush is a pain-in-the-can to clear away. Sleep above it.

- Cool.

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Nice pics Brian!

Your second pic is a good example of the only time I'd consider a hammock.

Heavy brush is a pain-in-the-can to clear away. Sleep above it.

- Cool.

 

I suspect you never spent a night in WB Blackbird. Once you've experienced the incredible comfort you'd leave tents for colder nights. We actually camped at some public campgrounds last summer in our hammocks while traveling for geocaching events. Surrounded by RVs and huge tents, people looked at our site with curiosity and many stopped by to ask questions about our hammocks. A few times we also pitched a small tent just for changing clothes and other times we wanted privacy but we slept in the hammocks. Other times we never even bothered with the tent and just changed under the privacy of the tarp.

Edited by briansnat

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You're correct.

I was hoping maybe the sportsmans expo in Harrisburg was gonna have one to play with, since such a huge place usually has plenty of "stuff".

I'm usually solo on most overnighters anymore with a bivy and tarp (most times no tarp) and a hammock just might work.

But then the rifle (everyone seems to think an assault weapon) thing happened and the whole shebang got canceled out. Wanted a simple yard model too and knew them to be there.

 

I did try a borrowed Travel AT and a Grand Trunk (don't know the model) while solo and though light, they just didn't seem "sturdy" enough.

My neighbor has a clark that weighs in a little less than half my entire pack , so that was out.

And a Henessy explorer, though comfortable, two for us would actually weigh-in about the same as our tent.

 

At just under our tent weight, I wouldn't spend the bucks for a product test.

If we didn't cache beforehand (dirty and all), maybe some guy we know would let us see what they feel like, at an event or something, next time we bump into him... :D

Edited by cerberus1

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My fiancee and I have a ENO Double Nest that we use for lounging in around our campsite. It's very comfortable, I fall asleep in it very quickly. Although we technically can both fit in it together, it's pretty awkward and uncomfortable.

I'm considering getting another one for us and ditching our hiking tent. Sleeping on the ground with just a little air mat gets more and more unappealing every night we're out.

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I have the hennessy expedition. I love it. Its a great hammock tent. The only thing about hammocking that you will find, is that you need an underquilt if the temps are below 60 or so. The cool breeze blowing under you sucking the heat away is great in the summer, but in the winter it sucks. I spent the night in mine down to 40 degrees, in a 20 degree sleeping bag, and it felt like I was laying on ice. Thankfully you can get underquilts pretty easily in a variety of ratings, just like a sleeping bag. Underquilts don't go under you, they go right under the hammock. I have a zero degree one from hammockgear. I crawled into my hennessy and it was like being on an electric blanket after a few minutes. I woke up to 30 degrees, ice on the rainfly, and was still warm. You can use your regular bag in a hammock but a lot of hammockers go with a top quilt instead. The top quilt and hammock quilt work together, like a sleeping bag with the hammock between them. On the plus side, if you get them in down, they compress really well compared to synthetic sleeping bags.

I just got an ENO single nest. The hennessy is nice and all, but the ENO was cheaper and lighter, and without a bug net. Since I already had the Hennessy larger tarp and tree straps, the ENO is my Winter Hammock (no bug net). I added a set of whoopie slings and got rid of the carabiners which were heavy and tend to snag the sling lines. I havent slept in it yet. I'll probably wind up replace the hennessy ropes with the whoopie slings too. They set up so much faster, and are smaller/lighter than the original hennessy ropes.

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First question: Are you hiking in the east or the west? It makes a difference in terms of whether or not you'll easily find trees to hang between.

 

When I lived in the east, I almsot exclusively hammock camped. I found it to be more comfortable than sleeping on the ground in a tent. I have an ENO set-up with a tarp. There are two things I cannot stress the need for: 1. you still need a sleeping pad to insulate you underneath. No matter how heavy your sleeping bag is, you'll still flatten the insulation under you, and a slight breeze will cool you down in an instant. So, bring your sleeping pad. 2. Mosquitos will still get in. I ended up getting the ENO bug screen, which adds an extra pound to my kit. Ultimately, the hammock + bug net + tarp weighs as much as a tent, and doesn't really take up much less room, but you're not limited to finding flat, clear ground to sleep. You are limited to finding trees that are large enough to hold you, but small enough to get your straps around, and the right distance apart to pull the hammock and tarp nice and tight. In the western forests, the tree situation is my biggest problem. Either I'm camping high enough in elevation that trees are scarce, or I'm in forests where the trees are huge and fairly spread out. The last trip I took, I brought the hammock instead of the tent and managed just fine, so I may continue to bring it with me on future excursions.

 

As far as ENO vs. Hennessey, I use ENO because I bought my hammock first for lounging around, and later brought it backpacking. If I had to do it all over again, I'd get an all-in-one system with integrated bug screen and fitted tarp. They tend to be lighter and more compact. My first experience backpacking with a hammock was using a Hennessey. I was cold because I thought I could get away without bringing a sleeping pad. A heavy thunderstorm rolled in over night, I stayed pretty dry, but wished I had that pad under me. It's a neat system and takes some getting used to. Entering from underneath has its advantages over climbing in from the side. On the other hand, an ENO is easy to just slap up when you're out on a day hike or even out at the park. I'll even bring it to outdoor concerts where trees are available instead of bringing a chair.

 

And just so you know, I've camped in the hammock in temperatures down into the 30's. As long as you are well insulated (sleeping pad and proper sleeping bag), you'll stay just as warm as you would in a tent.

Edited by mineral2

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I definitely sit in the Warbonnet camp personally but I am an exclusive hammock camper. I haven't slept in a tent out backpacking in my life (I have slept in a tent before though ... hence why I'd never do it again)

 

However if you are really hesitant about what to do I suggest you check out hammockforums.net (it's about camping hammocks not just hammocks) ... there are thousands of us crazy people there and any questions you could ever want/need answered are probably already done.

 

I actually discovered geocaching through that forum.

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Here are our Blackbirds set up during our recent Adirondack paddle camping trip.

 

1266944_10200899922713342_1116347919_o.jpg

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Briansnat,

The wife and I have been hammock camping a good bit this year. We finally got to try a Blackbird and HH Asym at a recent hammock campout. She loves the Hennesey and I'm leaning toward that blackbird ( though I'm reserving the final decision until after I try some bridge hammocks.) The BB is a sweet rig.

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One thing I don't like about the bridge hammocks I've seen is that you lay in a "trough" and can't see anything but the sky. A feature I really like about the Blackbird is that I can throw the netting over the ridgeline and tie it back so I can use it as a camp chair or just for lounging. Can't do that with the Hennesseys I've seen.

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Did get to try one bridge style and it was a Jacks-r-better. Visibility was actually better than most other hammocks I'd tried. Those are rather narrow in the center and allow a good view. I did feel that "trough" thing you talk about in the shoulders, but the JRB is narrow. Warbonnet makes a Ridge Runner bridge that is 40 inches wide at the shoulder. Hope to try that one out.

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I actually got my son the Hennessy Hyperlite Asym Zip this Fall. He's had an ENO for several years and has used it on occasion for car camping and summer camps, but it seemed a bit bulky/heavy for backpacking.

 

Getting some advice from my sister, who is a devout hammock camper (PCT/AT/CDT veteran), she steared me towards one of the Hyperlite models (she sleeps in hers nearly year round, even at home). My son's hammock arrived just in time for a family visit, where my sister showed me how to set it up. I gave it a try that night, and although it's definitely an "acquired taste", I must say the Hennessey was by far the best hammock experience I've had. Very spacious design, and the stabilizers kept it from swinging for the most part, and best of all, I didn't feel like my shoulders were getting crushed throughout the night. I did get a bit chilly towards morning, and my sister suggested a full length pad to cure that problem in the future.

 

I presented it to my son, who promptly threw a couple of closed shut lag screws into his bedroom wall, and now spends most of his nights sleeping in it :)

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Here's some thoughts on Hammocks,

I own 3, DD Hammocks Front-line (This was my first Hammock, it's in the cheaper end of the market and in my opinion a really good buy. I've spent a good amount of time in it however the first thing I would do is change out the standard hanging ropes for whoopie slings and tree huggers).

Jacks R Better Bridge Hammock (I fell out with this one because of how the bug netting is, I like to read in bed and it's not that possible in this hammock another issue that seems to be inherent to bridge hammocks is that I find that if your reaching out for your stove or coffee in the morning there's a point where you'll reach a little too far and end up on your backside/face :unsure: ).

Finally, my Warbonnet blackbird (this is the one that I'm still using I can't sing it's praises enough, although funnily this is the one that I never made a review of).

I've never owned a hennesy however I have friends that have them, not for me I'm afraid.

 

Insulation,

You're going to be needing some sort of insulation under you any of the ones mentioned above will work with a ground mat, however for the ultimate in luxury you should look at getting an underquilt

 

Hope this helps, if you'd like more information feel free to ask.

 

Simon

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I checked out another thread on hammocks. There was a lot of talk about under quilts.

 

Anyone have any experiences or suggestions regarding quilts to share?

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I checked out another thread on hammocks. There was a lot of talk about under quilts.

 

Anyone have any experiences or suggestions regarding quilts to share?

 

I was surprised to sleep comfortably in 20 degree weather without an underquilt. Granted I was using a zero degree bag but I was toasty all night. I had slipped a space blanket between the layers of my Blackbird so that might have made a difference.

 

Underquilts are extremely expensive. Heck, most cost more than my hammock and tarp combined. I have several square sleeping bags that I haven't used in years. I was thinking of cutting them in half lengthwise and finding someone with a sewing machine to sew the cut end closed. Then adding grommets to the corners so I could hang it as an underquilt.

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I checked out another thread on hammocks. There was a lot of talk about under quilts.

 

Anyone have any experiences or suggestions regarding quilts to share?

 

I was surprised to sleep comfortably in 20 degree weather without an underquilt. Granted I was using a zero degree bag but I was toasty all night. I had slipped a space blanket between the layers of my Blackbird so that might have made a difference.

 

Underquilts are extremely expensive. Heck, most cost more than my hammock and tarp combined. I have several square sleeping bags that I haven't used in years. I was thinking of cutting them in half lengthwise and finding someone with a sewing machine to sew the cut end closed. Then adding grommets to the corners so I could hang it as an underquilt.

 

Is there an advantage to an under quilt over sticking a sleeping pad in your hammock? I throw my thermarest in the hammock and find that t also provides some extra support as well as warmth. This seems like a cheaper, lighter, and less bulky solution.

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I checked out another thread on hammocks. There was a lot of talk about under quilts.

 

Anyone have any experiences or suggestions regarding quilts to share?

 

I was surprised to sleep comfortably in 20 degree weather without an underquilt. Granted I was using a zero degree bag but I was toasty all night. I had slipped a space blanket between the layers of my Blackbird so that might have made a difference.

 

Underquilts are extremely expensive. Heck, most cost more than my hammock and tarp combined. I have several square sleeping bags that I haven't used in years. I was thinking of cutting them in half lengthwise and finding someone with a sewing machine to sew the cut end closed. Then adding grommets to the corners so I could hang it as an underquilt.

 

Is there an advantage to an under quilt over sticking a sleeping pad in your hammock? I throw my thermarest in the hammock and find that t also provides some extra support as well as warmth. This seems like a cheaper, lighter, and less bulky solution.

I can think of two advantages:

 

1. It stays in place instead of slipping out from underneath you.

2. It won't become compressed like what would happen with your scenario. When you lose your loft, you decrease your insulation.

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I have a Grand Trunk Skeeter Beater Pro. It is an awesome hammock. I love to hang when camping. It is so much more comfortable for me than a tent.

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I have to thank the posters in this thread. After reading it my interest was piqued enough to check into the hammock phenomenon that I had somehow missed. Got a doublenest one link, threw in a diy armaflex sleeping pad and a base layer, slept like a babe. Walked out of the woods to the event that was being thrown. I was well rested and not stiff at all. Made the hike and have stayed in it several nights since. I now look for camping locations near events or challenges I plan on being a part of. The hammock and gear stay with me, like a hotel room where I choose the view. Awesomesauce. On slow smoked ribs.

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Bringer..seeing that you have taken well to hanging...hammockforums.net is is your new friend. Also lookup "Shug Emery/hammocks" on Youtube. Excellent instructor...funny too.

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Already registered and posting at hf. Shugs videos are quite entertaining as they make me look like I know what I'm doing when I get out there. Of course the credit is diverted to him when the questions inevitably arise. Highly recommend anyone interested to follow the advice you just gave me.

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I use the Clark NX250 Jungle Hammock. It packs up nice and small, has a built in bug net, weather shield, and is lighter than my Kelty 2.1 tent with the tarp included. It has six pockets under the body area which adds protection from wind and allows stuffing w/an insulation kit or stuff w/clothes if it gets real cold.

I used the Clark on a motorcycle road trip from Seattle to Monterey via Crater Lake and Lassen before taking it on a week long trip in the Pasayten Wilderness. It is very comfy and was a gathering place for three under the tarp when we got stuck in an extreme thunder storm.

I will never go back to a tent, and I just recently purchased another hammock for taking on day hikes.

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My go to hammock is my Warbonnet Blackbird 1.1 DL with Dutch clips. I have an Eno DN with Whoopies slings for backup but prefer the WB for hiking because it is a lot lighter. I use a Warbonnet Mamba Top Quilt, a Warbonnet Superfly tarp, or a WL Big Daddy with door kit. My underquilt is a Under ground quilt Zeppelin 3/4 length 20 degrees. If you don't know what I am talking about yes check out the hammock forums and ask questions. Hammock hangs are held throughout the world and can be seen on the site. Hope this helps

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I have a Grand Trunk Skeeter Beater Pro. It is an awesome hammock. I love to hang when camping. It is so much more comfortable for me than a tent.

 

Same hammock my son uses and loves it.

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I checked out another thread on hammocks. There was a lot of talk about under quilts.

 

Anyone have any experiences or suggestions regarding quilts to share?

 

I was surprised to sleep comfortably in 20 degree weather without an underquilt. Granted I was using a zero degree bag but I was toasty all night. I had slipped a space blanket between the layers of my Blackbird so that might have made a difference.

 

Underquilts are extremely expensive. Heck, most cost more than my hammock and tarp combined. I have several square sleeping bags that I haven't used in years. I was thinking of cutting them in half lengthwise and finding someone with a sewing machine to sew the cut end closed. Then adding grommets to the corners so I could hang it as an underquilt.

 

Arrowhead-equipment.com makes an underquilt called the Jarbridge for about 100-150 but it is a 3/4 length.

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I checked out another thread on hammocks. There was a lot of talk about under quilts.

 

Anyone have any experiences or suggestions regarding quilts to share?

 

I have used a thermarest and neo air pad, then my wife bought me an underquilt, once I got it dialed in. This is the way to go, but a pad is a good start used mine for over a year.

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Stop bumping this thread to the top! I keep burning hours looking over the options! :laughing:

 

My MSR Hubba Hubba is finally breaking down after all these years and now that I'm in the market, my wife is cringing. :ph34r:

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I've been really really researching Hammock tents and am pleasantly surprised to find this thread on my new favorite hobby-site too!

So far it seems Warbonnet Blackbird is where I'm leaning, so slooowly saving up for one. I've camped in a "Walmart special" hammock once, and used a wool army blanket as "underquilt" with a very nice 20^ coldweather sleeping bag and tarp above. Kept me more than warm enough in slight drizzle 40-degree overnight conditions.

I've tent-camped for years, with Scouts, and now as a leader, I'm hoping to continue my adventures on my own combined with Cache-hunting. Thanks for the references above to hammock forums, and such.

Adairondaks, here I come! (next summer, once I get the hammock) :P

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What is the experience of big people ?

 

Straps or ropes for trees ?

 

What kind of straps ?

 

What is your hang height?

 

Used mine one night and must say that I must have had done something wrong, because it was a pain to hang, pain to keep hung and not all that great to sleep in. ENO single nest. Planning on a trip in a couple of weeks on C&O Canal on bike and am thinking of going with the tent again, as I do not want to be messing with it 3 nights in different locations.

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Straps. Always straps. Ropes can damage the trees, which does not conform to LNT principles. For simplicity, get eno atlas straps. About $30, very easy daisy chain setup. These are polyester, so no stretching like nylon straps. If you want to know more,(a lot more) check out hammockforums.net . There is a plethora of info. If you prefer video, check out shugemery on YouTube. That guy is informative and entertaining. He has a series for beginners on hammock basics that helped me tremendously before I even started ordering my setup. I also use an eno (doublenest) with the aforementioned atlas straps and a dry fly is one of a few tarps I have. I've slept in it in excess of 25 nights. Once you get the "hang" of it, hammock camping is awesome! There are so many options, there is surely a setup to meet and possibly exceed your needs. Best of luck, my friend.

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Straps. Always straps. Ropes can damage the trees, which does not conform to LNT principles. For simplicity, get eno atlas straps. About $30, very easy daisy chain setup. These are polyester, so no stretching like nylon straps. If you want to know more,(a lot more) check out hammockforums.net . There is a plethora of info. If you prefer video, check out shugemery on YouTube. That guy is informative and entertaining. He has a series for beginners on hammock basics that helped me tremendously before I even started ordering my setup. I also use an eno (doublenest) with the aforementioned atlas straps and a dry fly is one of a few tarps I have. I've slept in it in excess of 25 nights. Once you get the "hang" of it, hammock camping is awesome! There are so many options, there is surely a setup to meet and possibly exceed your needs. Best of luck, my friend.

 

PS, I just noticed this weekend that ENO added an extended length version of their Atlas straps. Weighs 16 oz instead of 11, but if you find yourself in places where the trees are either too far apart or too wide to fit around, the longer straps might be for you.

 

By the way, I just bought a pair of Atlas straps for a backpacking trip this past weekend. They are so nice as they don't stretch through the night. I'll ditch my nylon slap straps for good.

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What is the experience of big people ?

 

Straps or ropes for trees ?

 

What kind of straps ?

 

 

I first used ropes...tied with a timber hitch. Works, but it does leave dents in soft trees. We now use whoopee slings and tree hugger straps. Easier on soft bark trees and give much more flexibility for selecting a hang site. I can hang between trees that are 15' apart or 25' apart because this system is easily adjustable. I would also recommend (for this system) to use a "structural ridgeline". For hammocks like I use I like to lay diagonally. The structural ridgeline lets me keep a consistant "sag" on the hammock no matter how far apart my anchor trees are. This aided in my personal comfort a lot.

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I know this thread hasnt been touched in months, but I am a LONG time hanger, started with a DD hammock in 2006. Went to a Hennesy Asym exped in 2007, then a Blackbird in 2008 or so (whenever Brandon first debuted-I was a first run WBBB guy). I faithfully hung in that trusty Blackbird, until this week. I did a winter hang last weekend, and finally got to try out a WB Ridgerunner. And immediately fell in love. I sold my WBBB and UQ on hammockforums within 20 minutes, ordered a ridgerunner, and got it this week. The only downside? I cannot hang in it for the next couple weeks!

I havent slept in a tent in years. I could probably count the times in the past 8 years I've slept in a tent on one hand. Once you find the hammock solution that fits you, you will not go back to ground voluntarily!

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^ Fun to see how things are improving each year.

Now that many are closer to 1# (then adding all the extras to be comfortable in cold, straps..) it's starting to make me want to take a serious look again. :)

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^ Fun to see how things are improving each year.

Now that many are closer to 1# (then adding all the extras to be comfortable in cold, straps..) it's starting to make me want to take a serious look again. :)

Plus 1.

 

My MSR Hubba Hubba has finally failed on me. The floor is allowing moisture to soak through, and the urethane on the fly is deteriorating. It served me well for nine years or so. I'm now in the justifiable market to replace it and the areas I'm finding myself in call for a hammock more than a ground tent.

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Hammock pros:

- More comfy (for the vast majority of folks)

- More site selection options - no more finding a flat, open area

- Set up tarp first and stay dry and above ground flooding issues

- More comfy (it's important enough to list twice!)

 

Tent pros:

- Easier to use when there are no trees (although I often use a hammock stand)

- More foolproof (using a hammock system has a slightly steeper learning curve, although very much worth it!)

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I got a Hennessy Asym Zip last winter and used it on all my overnights since. Absolutely love it. I'm just under 6' tall and 200 lbs and slept quite comfortably each time.

 

I use a down sleeping bag in the spring and fall and haven't had the need for a quilt. The only downside I found is with the size of the rainfly. I'd recommend getting the larger one. No more nights on the ground for me, I'm hooked!

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I'm an avid sewer and I love altering outdoor gear.

 

I bought a Hennessey hammock years ago, the first thing I did was rip it apart.

 

I'm claustrophobic, so I put in a zipper in the side so I wouldn't freak out sleeping on top of my escape hatch.

 

Then later I added a velcro-on additional piece of fabric on top of the mesh roof. This made it so much incredibly warmer I couldn't believe! I tend to camp in a lot of different type of weather. I try not to camp in snow much, but have camped alone in 19 degrees, so I do need warmth in my tents.

 

My hammock tent, even with the additional velcro sheet I added to keep warmth in, still is not warm enough for me for winter camping. The cold still comes up through the floor (yes, with it hanging!).

 

I also modified the rain fly, almost doubling the size of it. It really wasn't big enough before.

 

Since the modifications I've used the hammock many times. I've really loved it, but may have had enough of it for a while. I still am very claustrophobic.

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I checked out another thread on hammocks. There was a lot of talk about under quilts.

 

Anyone have any experiences or suggestions regarding quilts to share?

 

I was surprised to sleep comfortably in 20 degree weather without an underquilt. Granted I was using a zero degree bag but I was toasty all night. I had slipped a space blanket between the layers of my Blackbird so that might have made a difference.

 

Underquilts are extremely expensive. Heck, most cost more than my hammock and tarp combined. I have several square sleeping bags that I haven't used in years. I was thinking of cutting them in half lengthwise and finding someone with a sewing machine to sew the cut end closed. Then adding grommets to the corners so I could hang it as an underquilt.

 

Arrowhead-equipment.com makes an underquilt called the Jarbridge for about 100-150 but it is a 3/4 length.

 

This is an interesting solution to the problem of cold coming up through the bottom.

 

I actually have an old sleeping bag someone gave me after they melted part of it in the dryer. Since I sew, I end up with this stuff and can often do a lot with them. Not sure I'll have need for it, since I'm thinking of getting rid of the Hennessey though. I did love it a lot, but I got another 4 season tent a couple of years ago that's my latest love. I can set it up in a fraction of the time of the hammock and don't need trees.

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I'm claustrophobic, so I put in a zipper in the side so I wouldn't freak out sleeping on top of my escape hatch.

Other than the weight on earlier models, this is our second.

My other 2/3rds has little issue if deep in a cave (as long as that light's on and I'm talking), but flattens against the wall in those huge elevators at Cabela's.

I thought it might be a movement thing until trying her out in scuba.

- And forget a fullface motorcycle helmet. :laughing:

She's fine inside our spacious teepee-like Golite Shangri-La 3, but I can't help thinking off the ground and "wrapped up" is gonna have her nixing the idea.

Maybe think more in the lines of solo days...

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I ended up replacing my Hubba Hubba with an REI Dash 2 instead of going with a full meal deal hammock setup. I'm looking at a simple light weight hammock with a mosquito mesh included to act as a backup when I'm off trail and can't find a good spot to setup and as something else to relax on instead of a log when I can if I find a camp location to support it.

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Been a long time since I posted here, come back to read up every now and then. Cool to see hammocks and my business getting a little discussion here. About 6 years ago I started the shop the Corolla posted about above. Been hammock camping all over the west for about 7 years now. If anyone has questions about hammocks and using them for camping I would be happy to help in any way.

 

Cheers,

 

Paul

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