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National Geocaching Calling Frequency

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Why not use the "National Simplex Frequencies" as outlined by the ARRL Band Plan for VHF and UHF, then move elsewhere after establishing contact. Additionally, moving to a "band plan" frequency (i.e., 147.510 or 147.495, as opposed to the odd increment 147.500), would help to maintain the standardization of frequencies that the band plan attempts to achieve.

 

By the way, I just re-joined the ARRL after a very long hiatus. If it keeps my interest, I may renew after the two years I signed up for.

 

I Roger your vector, Victor...... Over.

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In NE OK the group I run with is 146.500 simplex on 2 meter and channel 9 frs. we also use 148.000 for aprs when searching.

Rich,KD5JXU

 

quote:
Originally posted by W8TVI:

I have been reading in other threads about a possible frequencies to use when Geocaching and people saying that a lot of times that “other frequencies are often designated as hailing/simplex frequencies in particular geographic regions making the adoption of a National Geocaching Frequency difficult at best.” I say so what? That’s why we have band plans. At least here in the USA it is valid. I was looking at the band plan at the http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/bandplan.html and I picked these frequencies that I thought looked like they might be best for Geocaching use. We really need to have some national frequencies that we use. What good is it if everyone is using different frequencies? A lot of people don’t print out the cache page, and some people (like me) don’t want to have to be programming yet another frequency for just one cache. And how are we supposed to remember from cache to cache what they are using for this and that one? I personally would like to be able to go into an area that I haven’t been before and be able to call CQ (it IS ok to call CQ on voice and even on a repeater they do it on HF a lot, why not on the VHF and up in FM mode?) and be able to talk to a local geocacher and find out where there are some cool geocaches.

 

Anyway! Enough ranting for now. It would be much better if we picked a national frequency to use, and that’s why I am posting this here. So we can figure out what might work best. Don’t worry about interfering with some one else… listen first before you key up! icon_cool.gif

 

Here’s what I think would work:

 

6M: 52.540 (Listed as Secondary FM simplex in the band plan)

2M: 147.500 (That would put it right in the middle of the “147.42-147.57 Simplex” sub band)

70CM (AKA 440): 446.025 (in the middle of the 445.00-447.00 Shared by auxiliary and control links, repeaters and simplex (local option) sub band 25Khz off of the National simplex frequency)(this line edited 10/2 10:30pm eastern)

 

What are your thoughts on using these frequencies? (And don’t reply just saying that we shouldn’t pick a national frequency. Let’s work out a frequency that will work most places. I would like to hear from Hams that aren’t in the USA to let me know if these frequencies will work with the band plan there. Thanks!

 

Noel W8TVI

 

[This message was edited by w8tvi on October 02, 2002 at 09:01 AM.]

 

[This message was edited by W8TVI on October 02, 2002 at 07:32 PM.]


 

Rich Conn

kd5jxu@arrl.net

145.130 -

146.500 simplex

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quote:
Originally posted by KD5JXU:

In NE OK the group I run with is 146.500 simplex on 2 meter and channel 9 frs. we also use 148.000 for aprs when searching.

Rich,KD5JXU


 

Just a thought, but unless you are running your APRS on LSB, your 148.000 freq is illegal.

 

Lets say your radio modulates 3.5 Khz. Your lower limit would be 147.9965, which is fine. But your upper limit is 148.0035, which is OUTSIDE the passband. If you follow the theory of the modulation index, you will find it is even broader. There is a REASON why the band plan for 2m calls for a minimum of 10 Khz channel spacing. If you used 147.995, it would be safer. Better still, 147.990. Even better the nationally recognized APRS freq for your area.

 

I make no morality here. You need to decide if the risk, and/or your own value system will allow you to continue to violate FCC rules.

 

Cache on.

 

Mike. Desert_Warrior (aka KD9KC).

El Paso, Texas.

 

Citizens of this land may own guns. Not to threaten their neighbors, but to ensure themselves of liberty and freedom.

 

They are not assault weapons anymore... they are HOMELAND DEFENSE WEAPONS!

 

Edit: spelling.

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what about using murs stations they are what used to be called the color dot freqscies in busness radios tell they unlsised them. If you get a extrtnal anntinia you can get some disatnce.

quote:
Originally posted by Overland1:

Why not use the "National Simplex Frequencies" as outlined by the ARRL Band Plan for VHF and UHF, then move elsewhere after establishing contact. Additionally, moving to a "band plan" frequency (i.e., 147.510 or 147.495, as opposed to the odd increment 147.500), would help to maintain the standardization of frequencies that the band plan attempts to achieve.

 

By the way, I just re-joined the ARRL after a very long hiatus. If it keeps my interest, I may renew after the two years I signed up for.

 

_I Roger your vector, Victor...... Over._


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quote:
Originally posted by Overland1:

Why not use the "National Simplex Frequencies" as outlined by the ARRL Band Plan for VHF and UHF, then move elsewhere after establishing contact. Additionally, moving to a "band plan" frequency (i.e., 147.510 or 147.495, as opposed to the odd increment 147.500), would help to maintain the standardization of frequencies that the band plan attempts to achieve.

 

By the way, I just re-joined the ARRL after a very long hiatus. If it keeps my interest, I may renew after the two years I signed up for.

 

_I Roger your vector, Victor...... Over._


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Well then, time to add my two cents...

 

I've been a ham for four years, my father for nearly fourty. In my local circle of friends, there are two other hams. And neither of them carries a radio anymore.

 

Around here (Wash DC Metro area) FRS is -very- slogged down with family traffic in more populated areas, and many stores use them for comms. In the shopping centers they're all but useless, I've heard bands go useless due to kids causing trouble on any used frequency. This is when having a couple people with 2m's nice. I keep my little Alinco CJ-50 with me at all times. Did a quick mod to it to get the FRS band for it (Its a 2m/70cm) So I keep it with me instead of multiple radios.

 

When I go out caching, I take my cellphone, and my much larger HT (the CJ-50 has a 300mW output) for emergencies. Which I'll have on and scanning the local repeaters and 146.520. I don't expect to use it for group comms, since my fiancee doesn't have a ham license, and we just use FRS if thats a need.

 

There is alot of band/skill zealotry I've found in online ham locations. One guy around here calls anyone who doesn't know morse code and hasn't built a radio, an "Appliance User". I may not have built my radio, but I can repair it, and I know enough about radios to pass the FCC tests. I am not an experimenter, I've got enough hobbies as is that I can't handle another. Tell me I'm not worthy, for not having built my own radio. I won't care. I'm quite certain I've done some things you haven't as well. I can in fact wield a soldering iron quite well. My career does not require me to. Just because I've got a lowly tech no-code license doesn't mean I'm an underling. I've just got a little less skill in one area.

 

I'll have my radio on next time I'm looking for a cache. Maybe I'll hear someone next time.

 

-Ryan

KG4GUB

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quote:
Originally posted by Tet Solfire:

Well then, time to add my two cents...

 

I've been a ham for four years, my father for nearly fourty. In my local circle of friends, there are two other hams. And neither of them carries a radio anymore.

 

I don't expect to use it for group comms, since my fiancee doesn't have a ham license, and we just use FRS if thats a need.

 

There is alot of band/skill zealotry I've found in online ham locations. One guy around here calls anyone who doesn't know morse code and hasn't built a radio, an "Appliance User

 

-Ryan

KG4GUB


 

WHOA Buddy....

 

Nobody here is calling you anything but HAM OPERATOR. And welcome to the group. Next time that guy gets on your case, ask him this. Is there any part of your life that you are happy about, or are you this miserable all day long? After that, if he is still a jerk, just tell him you don't need to talk to him anymore. You expect to outlive him, and you can wait. That usually shuts them up.

 

Next... get your fiancee to get a license. My wife did, and my daughter is working on it. Much better than FRS.

 

Mike. Desert_Warrior (aka KD9KC).

El Paso, Texas.

 

Citizens of this land may own guns. Not to threaten their neighbors, but to ensure themselves of liberty and freedom.

 

They are not assault weapons anymore... they are HOMELAND DEFENSE WEAPONS!

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Ryan / KG4GUB:

 

Look me up sometime on the Bluemont repeater 147.300. It'd be great to chat with another Geocacher around here.

 

Of course, my occasional "custom phonetics" may have something to do with it, too:

 

N 5 Constantly Talking Idiot icon_smile.gif

 

-----

~ Boyd

N5CTI

 

"Never ask a man where he's from. If he's from Texas, he'll tell ya soon enough. If he ain't, don't embarrass him."

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quote:
Originally posted by Tet Solfire:

 

... One guy around here calls anyone who doesn't know morse code and hasn't built a radio, an "Appliance User"...

 

-Ryan

KG4GUB


 

Hey, I know Morse code, and have built several radios, and I still use appliances! How do you make a decent marguerita without a blender???

 

Serious, being a "low-code" Extra, i know what you mean. Since G. Marconi didn't endorse my ticket I am not nearly as good a ham as the "old school" Extras.

 

Your approach to radios and geocaching sounds reasonable to me. FRS is pretty useless in most of southern California, just due to population density. Actually we have a lot of hams here, too. I was told recently that the repeaters on Santiago Peak, in Orange County, have 10% of all licensed hams in the US in their footprint. Since over 15% of licensees are in California, it is not hard to believe.

 

I actually associate on a daily basis with several no-code techs(don't tell the other Extras--or tell them I am "elmering", yeah, that's it!). A couple of them are computer engineers I work with who have pretty substantial technical expertise.

 

Every hobby or activity has about 10% jerks. I'm sure you have read forum posts from some othe geocaching 10%. Don't pay attention to them, and you are a lot happier!

 

73's de Dave_W6DPS

 

My two cents worth, refunds available on request. (US funds only)

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quote:
Just because I've got a lowly tech no-code license doesn't mean I'm an underling. I've just got a little less skill in one area

 

I think I understand how you feel. Read my post here. Sadly, it's the idiots that leave the most lasting impression. DW and El Oso as well as everyone on this forum have completely changed my view of amateur radio. I recently tested for Tech and my call sign came up this morning. Someday I'll get a radio and hopefully run in to folks like that instead of some elitist moron.

 

http://fp1.centurytel.net/Criminal_Page/

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quote:
Originally posted by Dave_W6DPS:

Serious, being a "low-code" Extra, i know what you mean. Since G. Marconi didn't endorse my ticket I am not nearly as good a ham as the "old school" Extras.


 

WHOA WHOA WHOA again !!!!!

 

I am an old school Extra! I struggled and did the 20 WPM. I have even taken tests in front of the steely eyed FCC examiners.

 

Let me tell you, you are good enough for me! You have a license... more than some can say.

 

Got a bootlegger in the neighborhood. When I approached him and mentioned that his callsign was not listed on QRZ, he gave me some lame excuse about not wanting to have it listed.

 

When I came back and said he was not listed on the FCC database either, he said it was some screw-up. But, he hasn't been on the air since either.

 

I look down on no ham. I was there once. And for a very long time too!

 

Mike. Desert_Warrior (aka KD9KC).

El Paso, Texas.

 

Citizens of this land may own guns. Not to threaten their neighbors, but to ensure themselves of liberty and freedom.

 

They are not assault weapons anymore... they are HOMELAND DEFENSE WEAPONS!

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Yup, last time I checked, the FCC didn't put test scores or code speeds on their licenses. Hey, some folks just gotta have something to gripe about. *shrug*

 

And Criminal, I'm humbled that I may have played a role in encouraging you to go ahead and get your ticket. But you know, I'm not any different from 90+% of Hams in that regard. The vast majority of us want to share our hobby with others, and leap (pounce? icon_smile.gif) on the opportunity to add another to our numbers.

 

At any rate, congratulations, and welcome to the madness that is Amateur Radio! Just like buying a house, you now have permission to spend untold gobs of money on...er...stuff! icon_biggrin.gif

 

-----

~ Boyd

N5CTI

 

"Never ask a man where he's from. If he's from Texas, he'll tell ya soon enough. If he ain't, don't embarrass him."

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As I'm studying for Tech and code I noticed the Amateur's Code in the 1977 Radio Amateur's Handbook (Thanks Uncle Bob K7PKT - Silent Key). Seems to me that detractors are not following the Code of Conduct...

 

One

The Amateur is considerate ... He never knowingly uses the air in such a way to lessen the pleasure of others.

 

Two

The Amateur is Loyal... He offers his loyalty, encouragement and support to his fellow radio amateurs, his local club and to the American Radio Relay League, through which amateur radio is represented.

 

Three

The Amateur is Progressive ... He keeps his station abreast of science. It is well built and efficient. His operating practice is above reproach.

 

Four

The Amateur is Friendly... Slow and patient sending when requested, friendly advice and counsel to the beginner, kindly assistance, cooperation and consideration for the interests of others; these are marks of the amateur spirit.

 

Five

The Amateur is Balanced... Radio is his hobby. He never allows it to interfere with any of the duties he owes to his home, his job, his school, or his community.

 

Six

The Amateur is Patriotic... His knowledge and his station are always ready for the service of his country and his community.

 

And now for the current (and gender neutral) Amateur's Code as seen on page 11 of the Now You're Talking (5th ed.)

 

The Radio Amateur is:

Considerate...

Never knowingly operates in such a way as to lessent the pleasure of others.

 

Loyal...

Offers loyalty, encouragement and support to other amateurs, local clubs, and the ARRL, through which Amateur Radio in the United States is represented nationally and internationally.

 

Progressive...

With knowledge abreast of science, a well-built and efficient station and operation above reproach.

 

Friendly...

Slow and patient operating when requested; friendly advice and counsel to the beginner; kindly assistance, cooperation and consideration for the interests of others. These are the hallmarks of the amateur spirit.

 

Balanced...

Radio is an avocation, never interfering with duties owed to family, job, school, or community.

 

Patriotic...

Station and skill always ready for service to country and community.

 

The original Amateur's Code was written by Paul M. Segal, W9EEA, in 1928.

 

Why list this? One, it's OT to where this thread has evolved. Two, since the original code was written, it has changed little. For an interesting answer, ask the Fast Code Extra when they got their first license, and which code of conduct they adhere to.

 

Isn't it more rewarding to be an Elmer than a Elitist?

 

Todd Cady

 

Cadence

(OddTodd and CheleBell)

FRS2,12GMRS22(WPXD965)

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quote:
Originally posted by Cadence (OddTodd & CheleBell):

<snip>

Five

The Amateur is Balanced... Radio is his hobby. He never allows it to interfere with any of the duties he owes to his home, his job, his school, or his community.

<snip>

Balanced...

Radio is an avocation, never interfering with duties owed to family, job, school, or community.

<snip>

 

Isn't it more rewarding to be an Elmer than a Elitist?


 

I was never very good at that balanced stuff. I've been known to give up sleeping to work on building gear. If I could just afford the good toys without having to spend so much time working....

 

I like to try elmering now and again, but haven't tried elitism. So I may not be entirely qualified to comment, but I do get some satisfaction out of helping when I can. I have also gotten a lot of help over the years (and last few weeks, even) and that is one of the the things I really like about hams. There is always someone to answer a question, and usually loan you some gear or lend a hand to help you get on the air.

 

I've also noticed that spirit in many geocachers who are happy to help a 'newbie'.

 

Dave_W6DPS

 

My two cents worth, refunds available on request. (US funds only)

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If you think hams are good, you should try competitive high-power rifle. These guys will loan you everything from a mat to lay on to the rifle itself. My first two years shooting I didn't have my own gear, not even a qualifying rifle. I was instantly outfitted with older but usable gear. Slowly I have bought and returned all but the shooting jacket and glove. Maybe this year.

 

Ham radio to me is a hobby that I do when I can't do something else. Hike, geocache, shoot rifle or pistol matches, reload ammo, work with the dog, do the yard, clean the garage... ham radio on rainy days! When I get too old to do much of the above, I believe radio will play a bigger part in my life.

 

Mike. Desert_Warrior (aka KD9KC).

El Paso, Texas.

 

Citizens of this land may own guns. Not to threaten their neighbors, but to ensure themselves of liberty and freedom.

 

They are not assault weapons anymore... they are HOMELAND DEFENSE WEAPONS!

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I am all for a geocaching calling freq for ham radio,I would love to talk to other geocachers.It would justify all that fancy equipment I got gathering dust. icon_smile.gif, just my 2 cents worthicon_smile.gif

 

If I have to explain, You wouldnt understand..

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quote:
Originally posted by Dave_W6DPS:

A number of years ago this protocol was adopted byt he ARRL, and other organizations to provide some directions for those in need of help, or willing to listen for those needing help.

 

The protocol is fairly simple. At 7AM, and every three hours thereafter, the first 10 minutes on 146.52 are to be used for calling "MayDay" if you are lost or hurt. :10 to :15 for initiating general QSOs.

 

I tend to monitor .52 all the time when hiking, unless close enough to home to use our local repeater.

 

Our scout troop does also, and uses .52 to keep things together on the trail. If others are using this freq much we just QSY to 146.55 or .58.

 

It might provide a public service if anyone out in the rough were to monitor 146.52, at least in keeping with the "Wilderness Protocol".

 

My two cents worth, refunds available on request.

 

73's de Dave, W6DPS


 

W6DPS de N8PZT (Postitively Zany Technician) icon_biggrin.gif

 

I know this post is a bit ancient, but I just wanted to quip: If you have to call "Mayday" the proverbial waste matter has struck the equally proverbial air circulating device.

 

If I'm hurt, I'm going to use whatever I have available to get the message out, be it Ham HT/HF rig, cellular phone, commercial land mobile radio (licensed or not), semaphore flags, 1/2 Watt CW unit from MFJ, whistle, witch-like cackles icon_wink.gif, etc.

 

When you're in a serious enough pickle, anything goes! I'm kind of curious if this practice took off? I'd like to hear about it, anyway.

 

I've been a very inactive ham for quite a while--primarily due to lack of money to invest in either new or used equipment. I'd like to get involved with it again, but I really want to get a group of Happy, Joyful, and Creative Hams for a change. I'm tired of the Peyton Place-type arguments all the time.

 

Hoping to hear you on the bands and see you in the geocaching world.

73

N8PZT

Traverse City, Michigan

 

{--Firefishe--}

...Caching In on the Journey

 

Flat_MiGeo_B88.gif

---------------------------

The year is 2003.

The name is S.A. Brown.

BrowNAV (Brown Navigation)

---------------------------

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On the calling feq. idea, 147.500 Mhz is used heavily in my area by approximately 20 hams. This would be around Denison,TX. We could use any freq. though, so pick a couple and have a major vote. I here people on most of the other popular simplex frequencies. k5ym Dave

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Hello W8TVI, Well I was thinking why dont you come up with some Freq's and post them here. You can use them as "so called calling Freg's", then you dont have to worry about getting them coordinated and so on. I would advise staying off the the allications allready in use. Just pick some and start posting. I am kind a like Desert_Warrior, around here you have to go to and stay on what you have and if you have enough folks on then go to a simplex freq.but nine out of ten times you will be on a repeater here and then qsy. But just pick the freq's you want to use and start listing them. If they are not allicated or in use by somone or some net , then i dont see why that will not work. Unless a repeater is close to it then, it will not work. You cant have 5-10 people talking simplex on the same input or output as a repeater Freq. This may be your only problem.Good luck in your Hunt for Freq's and vry 73's

Happy Hunting

WV5V

Continouswave

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I don't think there was any real consensus made here. It seems most of the posts agreed with using the standard National Simplex frequency, and adhearing to the Wilderness Protocol. A few individuals wanted to re-invent simplex and make their own rules. I suppose they have done so. And because of that, lessened the worth of said standard National Simplex frequency and Wilderness Protocol.

 

My advice, if you are going somewhere, and expect to find/need help, better find out which freq is in use for the area. Instead of one national standard, we now have several self-proclaimed standards.

 

What can you do?

 

Mike. Desert_Warrior (aka KD9KC).

El Paso, Texas.

 

Citizens of this land may own guns. Not to threaten their neighbors, but to ensure themselves of liberty and freedom.

 

They are not assault weapons anymore... they are HOMELAND DEFENSE WEAPONS!

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Well.... fellow ham/geocachers.... I, myself being new to geocaching, but old to ham radio, will most likely scan several freqs of interest. Any named for Geocaching and others. I find it interesting to listen to "radio stuff" while traveling the wilds.

 

My"radio buddies" and I have always mixed ham radio with our other interests. It seems to fit in most every where.

 

....So, when I'm Geocaching, I'll be listening to you with my VX7, and maybe my FT817 on HFpack freqs.

 

have fun, CQ CQ CQ, de WB2DFC

 

CUL, 73, Dave

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....and another thing.... why not have an HF net or other type of net for Geocahers. HF would be best as participation would draw from a larger available group. Just a thought to mix radio and caching.

 

73, Dave, WB2DFC

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I'm fairly new to Geocaching, but I've been a codeless tech for about 11 years now. (I'll finish learning the code, I promise.) icon_smile.gif

 

Looks like most people on this board are taking a common sense approach to this topic. I have 146.52 loaded into my portable and my mobile, and scan them while the radio is in use. I can only assume a reasonable amount of other hams do this as well, so this would be the easiest way to handle it, imho.

 

My basic view on this is listen to 146.52, but be ready to move on to another freq, after making the initial contact. (I'm guilty of having a few QSOs on that freq, while mobile, but it also works out in that others will join in.) Of course this is only talking about 2m, but not many people seem to use the other bands as much.

 

As for FRS use while out and about, maybe Ch 1 would be a good choice, based on the attempt of using that on both FRS and CB. ("Midland 1 Listens") Obviously being ready to move off on another channel should there be a lot of traffic.

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quote:
Originally posted by krokus81:

My basic view on this is listen to 146.52, but be ready to move on to another freq, after making the initial contact. (I'm guilty of having a few QSOs on that freq, while mobile, but it also works out in that others will join in.)

 

...

 

(Talking about using FRS) Obviously being ready to move off on another channel should there be a lot of traffic.


It seems to me that folks should take the same approach in both circumstances: use 146.52 for calling and QSOs, until such time as it gets too crowded for that purpose. In some places, that may be all the time, but in my (limited) experience, very few people are ever on the Nat'l Calling Freq. In those cases, using it more, even for casual QSOs, will encourage more folks to monitor it, raising its value as the National Calling Frequency.

 

My 2¢.

 

-----

~ Boyd

N5CTI

 

"Never ask a man where he's from. If he's from Texas, he'll tell ya soon enough. If he ain't, don't embarrass him."

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quote:
Originally posted by El Oso - N5CTI:

 

It seems to me that folks should take the same approach in both circumstances: use 146.52 for calling _and_ QSOs, until such time as it gets too crowded for that purpose.


 

Also, if you keep the power fairly low, interference may never become a problem. I am, however, an advocate of make your contact there and move on to another frequency.

 

In our area, there are so many repeaters it is hard not to find one not being used. Often someone hears us and we get to explain (or try to) exactly what we are doing tromping thru wet high grass, poison ivy, sticker bushes, bugs, etc so we can sign a 2 inch by 4 inch log book.

 

Kinda liek why we wait for winter to do tower work. icon_rolleyes.gif

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aw just make it....hmmmm see I cant even remember the nat call freq 147.52 , not like its so busy..heck 2 meters is almost dead..and if we use echolink they yell at us...

n1kwv

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Anyone ever suggest a national calling frequency/net on 40 or 20, even 15 meters, say once a week or so, so geocaching hams could meet to BS, tell lies, etc. Bob/Kathy (Bobkat 1 & 2) VE6KH & KC0AIT North Dakota

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Phewww, man I'm glad thats over with. I wonder how many of the old timers posting here even own a gps unit?

 

Have fun, play radio...

 

Gary, K4Gap

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WOW!!! Why don't we just monitor the 146.52 on 2m and perhaps if everone carries a dual bander and programs all the FRS freq. or just channel 2. How often does anyone come across other geocachers while geocaching?? It would be nice to find other geocaching but come on guys this isn't anything to get all hussy fussy over. just enjoy the challenge... just my 2cents

 

KD5POY

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147.500 is used here by rag chewers in my area and 146.52 is dead most of the time. But poeple DO listen in, It would be good to be on 146.52 so people who dont know about geocaching can listen in and ask about it, then you get new caches to find when they get in to it....Use 146.52 and when you establish contact, QSY if you want, and use the 100 HZ pl...KC5DSW Tim in OKlahoma 1200s

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With the improvement of technology,there are more and more electronic products appear in people's daily life.We have to admit that the mobile phone make our modern life better and more convenient.However the cell phone sometimes cause new problems and breaks up people's peaceful life.To create a quiet condition, the video blocker can help a lot.

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