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scamplover08

Is it disrespectful to hide geocache in cemeteries?

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Best to ask for permission.

And don't hide on a grave, under or on a marker, or in such a way to cause seekers to disrespect the a grave or the setting. I've encountered some where the hide required finders to climb on markers to reach up into a tree to get the cache. Those get NAs from me real fast. There have been some other disrespectful placements as well. Stick to the outer edges of the cemetery if you can or an out of the way tree or something. If you want to bring people to a specific gravesite, then do an offset/multi by having folks get info from the site to determine the coords of the final elsewhere. For example, get the year of birth and year of death and do math with those numbers to determine the final lat. and long.

 

As long as caches and cachers are respectful, cemetery hides can be fun, educational, and fascinating.

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I would recommend hiding it near, but not in the cemetery. Just outside the fence perhaps. This means neither the cemetery owners nor cachers who feel it is inappropriate will be offended yet visitors will still be brought to the location.

 

An option that I enjoy - especially with cemeteries - is an offset Multi:

1) pick a notable grave marker or monument in the cemetery with legible markings

2) use that location as the posted coordinates, but hide no container there

3) put instructions on the cache page how to use the markings on the monument/headstone to find the actual coordinates of the cache - the physical container with the log (outside the cemetery)

 

Example: "The headstone at the posted coordinates reads 'Joe Smith, ABCD-EFGH' Cache is located at N 27 00.AFH W 80 00.BBG"

 

More concrete example - http://coord.info/GCVW0K

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As long as caches and cachers are respectful, cemetery hides can be fun, educational, and fascinating.

 

True dat.

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As long as caches and cachers are respectful, cemetery hides can be fun, educational, and fascinating.

 

True dat.

 

I second that. Cemeteries caches are our favorite, we always take the time to read some tombstones. They can be quite interesting especially the very old ones.

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As long as caches and cachers are respectful, cemetery hides can be fun, educational, and fascinating.

 

True dat.

 

I second that. Cemeteries caches are our favorite, we always take the time to read some tombstones. They can be quite interesting especially the very old ones.

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I second that. Cemeteries caches are our favorite, we always take the time to read some tombstones. They can be quite interesting especially the very old ones.

I enjoy multis in graveyards where the final coordinates are calculated from information on the stones. That gives me a good excuse to read lots of them.

 

To answer the title's question: hiding a geocache in a cemetery isn't inherently disrespectful, but it isn't inherently respectful, either. A lot of these people aren't visited very often, but that doesn't mean they'll put up with people being rude to them when they are visited.

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As long as caches and cachers are respectful, cemetery hides can be fun, educational, and fascinating.

 

True dat.

 

I second that. Cemeteries caches are our favorite, we always take the time to read some tombstones. They can be quite interesting especially the very old ones.

 

And don't forget the stone and metal artwork that is just waiting to be rediscovered. Some of it is quite detailed and sophisticated while other work is very primitive but no less beautiful.

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We have lots of cemeteries caches in our area.

I've visited a lot of really really old cemeteries looking for caches. Just yesterday, I visited a really old one. So old, the headstones were unreadable. I managed to see a date on one of them... Date of Death: 1828

 

I personally enjoy visiting the old cemeteries. I enjoy reading the headstones and imagining what the area looked like when they were buried.

Edited by Lieblweb

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The historical, cultural, art, geological lessons that can be gained from a cemetery cache are countless! I love a good cemetery hide that teaches a lesson. I have two myself: one a hybrid letterbox and one paying respect to the founder of our town.

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Thank you everyone! This particular cemetery hardly has visitors so bringing people near the area might prove to be a positive thing. I go there to visit the older grave sites myself, a lot of 1800's. I will be asking for permission from the owner, fingers cross I can place one on the premises. Otherwise there is a long driveway leading up to is with many well hidden spots. :-)

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I know of a really nice little cemetery near home, is it an okay place to hide a geocache?

 

There are many caches hidden in Mt Hope Cemetery. I don't think looking for a cache is disrespectful as long as one doesn't disturb grave sites. Hell the spirits may offer clues

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As long as caches and cachers are respectful, cemetery hides can be fun, educational, and fascinating.

 

True dat.

 

I second that. Cemeteries caches are our favorite, we always take the time to read some tombstones. They can be quite interesting especially the very old ones.

 

Also some of historical significance (pilgrims, famous citizens, war heroes, sad occasions such as flu epidemic etc.

 

But be extra careful with your thought process and planning for a cemetery cache - and ensure that you are being respectful to non cachers and cachers alike.

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I am new to geocaching, just found my first cache last week. But I for one can say I would feel comfortable with looking in a cemetery, as well as having people looking for a cache around my parents' tombstones. They would have found the idea of geocaching delightful. As others have said here, as long as people are respectful there is much to be learned in a cemetery, particularly the older ones. As a Catholic, I also view it as an opportunity to pray for the Poor Souls in Purgatory. There are many different religions that have different customs that could be incorporated into a geocache hunt to make the cemetery visit have a deeper meaning than just logging a piece of paper. I too love reading some of the old tombstones, and admire some of the more intricate artwork that can be found in older graveyards. Cache on...... :)

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I'm a noobie amd I'm wondering is there a way to do a search for cemeteries? Just cemetery caches?

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Let' keep this discussion thread related to education for the cemetery caches please. History, historic significance, cultural importance, etc. Thanks.

 

Mark Case

Education Forum Moderator

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Let' keep this discussion thread related to education for the cemetery caches please. History, historic significance, cultural importance, etc. Thanks.

 

Mark Case

Education Forum Moderator

 

I am confused as to what you are telling us NOT to discuss. "History, historic significance, cultural importance, etc." is not an actual complete sentence. Are these things that should NOT be mentioned in this thread? The wording of your statement is not clear. Please clarify. Thank you. :-)

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I'm a noobie amd I'm wondering is there a way to do a search for cemeteries? Just cemetery caches?

Nope, no way to isolate that criteria.

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My wife is not a fan of them. She thinks they are disrespectful. I personally LOVE them. We live around a few old mining towns, some are just ghost towns today. I will stand there and look at the dates and just try to imagine the way life was 150 years ago. The pioneers that came across the Cascade Mtn range in their wagons. Settled down fought with the natives, lived through the cold winters all of this while trying to subsist on the surrounding area.

 

As a matter of fact I have adopted a cache that was once just a marker for a for a gentleman that lived in the area. Nobody knew who he really was as he was a loner in the area. Then about 20 years after his death someone stumbled upon the marker and JUST HAD TO KNOW. So they did the research and footwork on the gentleman. Turns out he was a civil war survivor. He had lost his family during the war and had no place to go so he packed up and moved. So yes, they are great forms of education. I am always pointing out things when I take my kids in one to do cache. I also make them understand where are and that they should treat each plot with respect.

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And don't forget the stone and metal artwork that is just waiting to be rediscovered. Some of it is quite detailed and sophisticated while other work is very primitive but no less beautiful.

 

So true. That's the best part of cemetery visits for me. Both old and new headstones. The new etched stones can say so much about the deceased and some can be quite artistic. The old traditional headstones and crosses are really interesting especially when viewing different cultures and their traditional markers .

 

Here's a forum discussion that some might find interesting: Pictures - Cemetery Cool Caches

 

 

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I bet $10 someone has or will have a geocaching container built INTO their grave stone.

[/quote

 

Someone in WV had a TB number insbcribed on the back of his mother's gravestone. You log the cache by discovering the trackalbe. So it kinda already happened. Bet that was hard to explain to the stone engraver.

Edited by baack40

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Thanks for all the great discussion so far, however, we are going very off topic. This is the education forum. Please keep the cemetery caches related to education in some way. Thank you.

 

Mark Case

Education Forum Moderator

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Given a choice I would rather visit a cemetery to learn something, including respect and appreciation, than simply find a container off the back of some far-end fence post. Seems to me that cemeteries might just have something to discover. If anything it's probably the best leg use of a multi.

 

There's a multi in my area that has you visit a cemetery, a war memorial and a church to find the container. It's well worth the effort and appropriately listed. And yes it was geared towards learning. I think one part was about the youngest drummer in the American Civil war.

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While virts aren't published anymore (at the moment :anibad: ) there is one in the corner of an old military cemetary up near Benicia, California, pointing out the graves of German POWs and one dog which served in the military (buried with full honors.) Not something many people gave a lot of thought to, but history abounds in graveyards. Educational if done with care of selection and placement.

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Private property always requires permission. Outside of that...go for it. At this point in geocaching ethics...anything goes (that can get approval).

 

Also keep in mind that the guidelines include "all local laws apply". There are some states where it is illegal to 'play games' in cemeteries. Check with your local reviewer if you are unsure about your state.

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I like caches in or near cemeteries because I always learn something about local history when I visit. Loved learning some other local history stories on this thread.

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I have found 2 caches in cemeteries, both of which were associated with military graves, several waypoints inside cemeteries, at interesting graves, and 2 just outside, one of which was a good excuse to visit a really fascinating cemetery (the other was a bit dull to be honest). And I've found multiple caches near memorials of where people were killed, again all related to the first or second world wars. I think they are great ways of ensuring that some of these interesting memorials are visited, when often they wouldn't be seen very often. So as long as they are done tastefully, I think cemetery caches are great.

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I'm new to this, but it seems terribly disrespectful to me, especially if the cache is inside the cemetery.

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We look for hides in cemeteries, but always regret it during the search. The signal always bounces around due to the trees and hills. Graves are marked and not marked, we always manage to step on a grave or two. We always comment "Who the hell puts caches in cemeteries" yet we look. Actually we find no redeeming value in the placement of caches in cemeteries, can't figure the education aspect or the fascination in reading head stones. If banning cemetery caches happened, we wouldn't' feel the loss. Outside the perimeter fencing cache hides are fine, but traipsing through the grounds over graves, and into the landscaping, could do without.

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I'm new to this, but it seems terribly disrespectful to me, especially if the cache is inside the cemetery.

 

I will agree with this. Very disrespectful.

And I have no idea what any of this discussion has to do with education? Should be a Geocaching Topics, where it has been discussed many times.

Despite what another posted: I think that most geocachers find it disrespecful.

But, again, how is this an education topic?

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This topic is getting off track of the education aspect of history and culture. Closing the thread.

 

Mark Case

Education Forum Moderator

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