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New Garmin Oregon 600 Series


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No reason to track every second, unless you're a bee.

A fixed track point interval is useful for any kind of post processing. Waypoint averaging and track smoothing benefit from lots of data. And some post-processing activities (like geotagging images) require track-points to be precisely correlated to a specific time.

 

My setting tracks less often when on a straight line and more often in a curve.

This is the default "automatic" setting on many handheld units and is efficient in processor usage and storage. True that most people never need to change it, but see above -- some will.

Edited by user13371
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Sure because the Gpsr camera is not the top of the line. <_<

Just curious, how do you get the waypoint coordinates in the picture?

I just mark a way point of where the picture was taken. When I pull everything into BaseCamp I know which photo goes where. Kind of a PITA but not that difficult. But if you really wanted to add lat/long and altitude to a photo you can edit the exif data with 3rd party programs. Or just spend the extra money and get a 650 B)

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I just mark a way point of where the picture was taken. When I pull everything into BaseCamp I know which photo goes where. Kind of a PITA but not that difficult. But if you really wanted to add lat/long and altitude to a photo you can edit the exif data with 3rd party programs. Or just spend the extra money and get a 650 B)

Do you realize Basecamp will geotag the photos automatically based on your tracklog?

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I just mark a way point of where the picture was taken. When I pull everything into BaseCamp I know which photo goes where. Kind of a PITA but not that difficult. But if you really wanted to add lat/long and altitude to a photo you can edit the exif data with 3rd party programs. Or just spend the extra money and get a 650 B)

Do you realize Basecamp will geotag the photos automatically based on your tracklog?

Yes, That's why I mark a point so I know where the correct photo goes along my track log. I don't use the 3rd party programs to edit exif data on the photos it was merely another suggestion to adding lat/long/alt to a photo.

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Sure because the Gpsr camera is not the top of the line. <_<

Just curious, how do you get the waypoint coordinates in the picture?

I just mark a way point of where the picture was taken. When I pull everything into BaseCamp I know which photo goes where. Kind of a PITA but not that difficult. But if you really wanted to add lat/long and altitude to a photo you can edit the exif data with 3rd party programs. Or just spend the extra money and get a 650 B)

 

A technique I've used is the track data itself. At least with the Mac version of Basecamp, you can readjust the camera's offset multiple times before writing out the EXIF data. So even if you forget to sync the camera, you can actually use your whole set of photos to tweak and then apply the location data in one go.

 

But I'm with Team-Facetious, I have a DSLR and a mirrorless camera with an APS-C sized sensor in it. Both of these stomp all over the sensors used in the phones and GPSr devices floating around. One is about 5-7 years old at this point, and still beats my smartphone in picture quality. For those that prefer the convenience, or want a photographic record more than anything else, sure, use a sensor in your GPSr. But I can compose shots that the 650 could only dream of, and get a better photo than the 650 could ever provide. I'll save my money and use my mirrorless on hikes mounted on a monopod/hiking pole.

 

(Ugh, the problem of composing a post over a long period of time in bursts and watching folks blast by you in the conversation... whoops)

Edited by Kolenka
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If it's for geotagging, maybe you better buy a Gpsr with camera or a camera with Gpsr, syncronizing the camera with the Gpsr every time again is a drag.

 

Honestly, I just lost respect for you after you made that last post.

 

:):)

 

Doesn]t matter, as long as we find a good solution for the problems.

 

Funny thing is when I had a camera without a gpsr I wanted to geotag, now that i have some camera's with gpsr I never use it.

 

@Kolenka

I know about the geotagging programs that can be time adjusted, but you need to know the time difference between track and photo and in this case the TS want to know exactly on the second.

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I use gpicsync for geotagging all my photos, it's awesome, fast, easy to use and even does raw files.

 

Do *not* get a camera with built-in GPS. I tried few and they are very slow to obtain gps fix which renders them almost useless. They also eat up batteries and if you already own a nice SLR it would most likely be a downgrade in picture quality as well.

Edited by gulo
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I know about the geotagging programs that can be time adjusted, but you need to know the time difference between track and photo and in this case the TS want to know exactly on the second.

 

Which is why I do it in Basecamp. I can see where on my track it placed the photos before I "save" the final settings, and I can adjust the offset as I go. That combined with a couple memorable features along the track that are easy to place (a waterfall for example) mean I can do an entire set of pictures fairly quickly. At least it works this way with the Mac app, I haven't even tried the geotagging feature in Basecamp on Windows.

 

When doing these adjustments, the visual feedback is crucial, and saves a ton of time finding the correct offset to use. I wouldn't be geo-tagging at all if it wasn't possible to get this feedback on the track itself.

 

This technique can probably be made even better using the waypoint technique: Set one waypoint for one of your photos along the track. When geotagging the whole set, align that one photo to match the waypoint along the track, and watch as the rest of the photos along the track get geotagged correctly for you.

 

I use gpicsync for geotagging all my photos, it's awesome, fast, easy to use and even does raw files.

 

I'll have to take a look at that one too, since it claims to handle RAWs.

Edited by Kolenka
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Hi

 

Is oregon 600 supposed to indicate the batteries are fully charged if you are using Garmin rechargeable pack ?

 

Mine seems to be flashing charging light on and on....

 

I was little upset because I took it for my first bike ride today and it went from full charge to 2 bars in less than 15 minutes, what the heck?

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Also how do you physically put thousands and thousands of geocaches on, when you can only get 1000 in a pocket query. ( without using gsak, as I have a mac)

 

Thanks

 

Nick

 

Well I expect you will be able to store several PQs (with different names) in the GPSr... but Garmin's marketing people will be selling this as a reason for you to use their site of course. IF that actually has any caches anywhere near where you live of course!

 

Chris

 

That's my problem.

 

In the sw of England there are say 100 as opposed to 1000's from geocaching.com !

 

Know one has answered my queries so i'll try again.

 

Please can someone tell me how do you physically download and load up tens of thousands of geocaches onto the 600, when you can only get 1000 in a pocket query. I can't believe that you have to make 100 pocket queries to get the 100,000 loaded ???? ( and do this every week !!!!)

 

Chris above suggested he used Opencaching.com but on the basis that we are all chatting on Geocaching.com's forum i assume that you all use this like me.

 

i've never used Opencaching because its useless in the UK. So how's it done.

 

PS i cant use GSAK as it doesnt work on a mac.

 

thanks in advance.

 

Nick

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So...

 

What is the Bluetooth link to mobile basecamp like, what does it do, and does it have any benefits ? I can't find any answers on this feature yet, so hopefully someone here can help.

 

Also how do you physically put thousands and thousands of geocaches on, when you can only get 1000 in a pocket query. ( without using gsak, as I have a mac)

 

Thanks

 

Nick

 

 

What is the Bluetooth link to mobile basecamp like, what does it do, and does it have any benefits ? I can't find any answers on this feature yet, so hopefully someone here can help.

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So...

 

What is the Bluetooth link to mobile basecamp like, what does it do, and does it have any benefits ? I can't find any answers on this feature yet, so hopefully someone here can help.

 

Also how do you physically put thousands and thousands of geocaches on, when you can only get 1000 in a pocket query. ( without using gsak, as I have a mac)

 

Thanks

 

Nick

 

 

What is the Bluetooth link to mobile basecamp like, what does it do, and does it have any benefits ? I can't find any answers on this feature yet, so hopefully someone here can help.

 

I would like to know too.

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If the current tracklog full it goes to archiv folder and counts not the 200 Limit for Tracks. Almost infinite logging is possible until the internal memory ist full.

 

 

Sorry, for my english :(

 

First of all, do you actually have the Oregon 600? I emailed Garmin about this and one of the representatives said the archive folder have a limit of 2000 tracks. He did not explained what will happen for the 2001th track.

 

Second, I have to ask this again just because I need to be 100% sure that this is indeed how the Oregon 600 will have. So let's say I turn on the Oregon 600 and it achieved GPS connection at exactly midnight. Each tracklog can contain up to 10,000 track points. Assuming that the recording interval is at 1 second, then the 10,000 point limit will be achieved in about 2.78 hours. So what will happen to the 10,0001st track point? Will the 10,001th track point actually be the first point for the subsequent tracklog that will be created? Then it'll just rinse and repeat until I turn off the Oregon 600 right?

 

Third, if I were to set the option for the tracks to be archived on a daily basis, using the scenario that I had described above with a track log that is about half filled and now approaching midnight again, will the track log be stopped even though it hasn't reached a 10,000 track point limit and a new track log be created because it's now a new day?

 

Thanks for the help in advance!

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Anyone with the Garmin Oregon 600t, can you confirm that it only has 300MB available on the device? I can easily run out of this, and I don't want to trust to using a uSD card on it. I'm thinking about going ahead and picking up a 600 instead of the 600t just because it has 1.5GB of available internal memory.

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Will the 10,001th track point actually be the first point for the subsequent tracklog that will be created? Then it'll just rinse and repeat until I turn off the Oregon 600 right?

 

will the track log be stopped even though it hasn't reached a 10,000 track point limit and a new track log be created because it's now a new day?

 

 

Yes and Yes

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If the current tracklog full it goes to archiv folder and counts not the 200 Limit for Tracks. Almost infinite logging is possible until the internal memory ist full.

 

 

Sorry, for my english :(

 

First of all, do you actually have the Oregon 600? I emailed Garmin about this and one of the representatives said the archive folder have a limit of 2000 tracks. He did not explained what will happen for the 2001th track.

 

Second, I have to ask this again just because I need to be 100% sure that this is indeed how the Oregon 600 will have. So let's say I turn on the Oregon 600 and it achieved GPS connection at exactly midnight. Each tracklog can contain up to 10,000 track points. Assuming that the recording interval is at 1 second, then the 10,000 point limit will be achieved in about 2.78 hours. So what will happen to the 10,0001st track point? Will the 10,001th track point actually be the first point for the subsequent tracklog that will be created? Then it'll just rinse and repeat until I turn off the Oregon 600 right?

 

Third, if I were to set the option for the tracks to be archived on a daily basis, using the scenario that I had described above with a track log that is about half filled and now approaching midnight again, will the track log be stopped even though it hasn't reached a 10,000 track point limit and a new track log be created because it's now a new day?

 

Thanks for the help in advance!

 

The T model is not worth it, because the Topo is not that good, there are free Topo maps from many places on the world that are much better.

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Anyone with the Garmin Oregon 600t, can you confirm that it only has 300MB available on the device? I can easily run out of this, and I don't want to trust to using a uSD card on it. I'm thinking about going ahead and picking up a 600 instead of the 600t just because it has 1.5GB of available internal memory.

 

Why would you not trust a micro sdcard. They work fine and when you get the well known Garmin glitch reboot that leaves you with no caches showing on the device you can't follow the standard protocol to get them back.

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Anyone with the Garmin Oregon 600t, can you confirm that it only has 300MB available on the device? I can easily run out of this, and I don't want to trust to using a uSD card on it. I'm thinking about going ahead and picking up a 600 instead of the 600t just because it has 1.5GB of available internal memory.

 

According to the Garmin Oregon 6xx Wiki (at http://garminoregon6xx.wikispaces.com/Hardware) the memory in the various models is as follows:

600 - 1.8GB total with 1.5GB free

600t - 3.6GB total with 809MB free

650 - 3.6GB total with 2.6GB free

650t - 7.2GB with 4GB free.

 

These figures are backed up by screenshots, but the t models will presumably vary a bit depending on which country's topo map is installed. The 650 models are still not released yet so the figures must be based on pre-production units.

 

The Oregon 6xx Wiki has a lot of other very useful answers to some of the questions being asked here, and is being created by early users.

 

Chris

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Ok, so I just picked up a Garmin Oregon 600 over lunch.

 

Unless there's something I haven't done to make it show it, there's very little road detail in the default maps. I'm not talking about poor quality neighborhood detail (which my Garmin Oregon 400t has.) I'm talking about 4 lane roads missing. Almost anything below Hwy level is not there. That is not what I was expecting? Please tell me I'm doing something boneheaded on this. I like the touch screen interface, not as good as my Galaxy S4 phone, but it's decent enough.

 

One other, albeit minor complaint so far is that I've got to take the carabener clip off to be able to plug in the USB. The USB plug is straight in towards the back instead of up from the bottom like they used to make it. I guess this could be a bit better on sealing it, but it's annoying that I'll have to take the clip off. The only reason I ever took the clip off on my 400t was to get assess to the batteries.

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If you bought a 600 and not a 600t, then there is only a worldwide basemap included.

 

Yes, and what I'm saying is that either mine isn't showing up the full basemap, or the basemap is significantly inferior to the quality of the basemap that is on my Garmin Oregon 400t.

 

Here's a pic that I took. Please note that I can zoom all the way in and no other roads show up. I've went into setup map -> advanced setting -> Detail -> Most. Nothing seems to have changed.

 

20130517_135919.jpg

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Well Garmin is at it again.... I just checked on LL Bean and my order for a 650T has been delayed yet again. Expected shipping is now June 1. That's a big bummer for me as it means the cost of the unit is now increased by $32.94. That's due to the fact I will now need the unit shipped to my summer place in CT where Bean's has to charge the sales tax. I originally ordered on Jan 30. Oh Well I hope the wait is worth it. So far my trusty old 550t is soldiering on.

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If you bought a 600 and not a 600t, then there is only a worldwide basemap included.

 

Yes, and what I'm saying is that either mine isn't showing up the full basemap, or the basemap is significantly inferior to the quality of the basemap that is on my Garmin Oregon 400t.

 

Here's a pic that I took. Please note that I can zoom all the way in and no other roads show up. I've went into setup map -> advanced setting -> Detail -> Most. Nothing seems to have changed.

 

20130517_135919.jpg

 

You don't have the basemap in your 400t, you have the 100K topo as your "basemap". Therefore, it's more detailed than the basemap you have in the 600.

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So you're saying the Topo Maps have better road maps than the Basemap. Wow, that's pretty crappy if you ask me. I would have sprung for the 600t, but REI was out of stock and I wanted to make sure I have it before heading out to Geowoodstock next week. I'm out of town this weekend (Boy Scout campout and all.)

 

I'm just glad REI has a good exchange/refund policy. I'll be exchanging it as soon as they have a 600t in stock and I'm in town.

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Just install free detailed maps. There are many good ones available.

 

Founds some good hiqh quality routable OSM IMG of the use - 3.6GB on a uSD card I tossed in from an old phone. Also found where I can generate some KMZ's for topo's should I want them. I normally don't use them as my area (Houston) is flat, flat, flat.

 

20130517_193433.jpg

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Anyone with the Garmin Oregon 600t, can you confirm that it only has 300MB available on the device? I can easily run out of this, and I don't want to trust to using a uSD card on it. I'm thinking about going ahead and picking up a 600 instead of the 600t just because it has 1.5GB of available internal memory.

 

According to the Garmin Oregon 6xx Wiki (at http://garminoregon6xx.wikispaces.com/Hardware) the memory in the various models is as follows:

600 - 1.8GB total with 1.5GB free

600t - 3.6GB total with 809MB free

650 - 3.6GB total with 2.6GB free

650t - 7.2GB with 4GB free.

 

These figures are backed up by screenshots, but the t models will presumably vary a bit depending on which country's topo map is installed. The 650 models are still not released yet so the figures must be based on pre-production units.

 

The Oregon 6xx Wiki has a lot of other very useful answers to some of the questions being asked here, and is being created by early users.

 

Chris

 

A word of warning

 

I have had my Oregon 450, now Oregon 600, lose track of my loaded Geocaches. Keeping them on the internal memory means finding a computer to delete then reload them between power down/power up cycle, to clear memory.

 

I find it a very good idea to get a MicroSD card, 8G or better, depending upon your needs for maps, mostly, and keeping maps and pocket queries on it. If it looses track of things you only need to power down, remove batteries, MicroSD card, replace batteries, power up, power down, remove batteries, replace MicroSD, replace batteries and power up again, to recover - something you can do in the field, away from computer.

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Will the 10,001th track point actually be the first point for the subsequent tracklog that will be created? Then it'll just rinse and repeat until I turn off the Oregon 600 right?

 

will the track log be stopped even though it hasn't reached a 10,000 track point limit and a new track log be created because it's now a new day?

 

 

Yes and Yes

 

Do you have the answers for my other questions?

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So you're saying the Topo Maps have better road maps than the Basemap. Wow, that's pretty crappy if you ask me. I would have sprung for the 600t, but REI was out of stock and I wanted to make sure I have it before heading out to Geowoodstock next week. I'm out of town this weekend (Boy Scout campout and all.)

 

I'm just glad REI has a good exchange/refund policy. I'll be exchanging it as soon as they have a 600t in stock and I'm in town.

 

Consider it this way. If you are next to a highway entrance in SF and want to go to a highway exit in LA it will take you on the highways. Once you leave the major highway it has nothing. Has always been that way. By the way the t model is not routable if yox are looking for that.

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Anyone with the Garmin Oregon 600t, can you confirm that it only has 300MB available on the device? I can easily run out of this, and I don't want to trust to using a uSD card on it. I'm thinking about going ahead and picking up a 600 instead of the 600t just because it has 1.5GB of available internal memory.

 

According to the Garmin Oregon 6xx Wiki (at http://garminoregon6xx.wikispaces.com/Hardware) the memory in the various models is as follows:

600 - 1.8GB total with 1.5GB free

600t - 3.6GB total with 809MB free

650 - 3.6GB total with 2.6GB free

650t - 7.2GB with 4GB free.

 

These figures are backed up by screenshots, but the t models will presumably vary a bit depending on which country's topo map is installed. The 650 models are still not released yet so the figures must be based on pre-production units.

 

The Oregon 6xx Wiki has a lot of other very useful answers to some of the questions being asked here, and is being created by early users.

 

Chris

 

A word of warning

 

I have had my Oregon 450, now Oregon 600, lose track of my loaded Geocaches. Keeping them on the internal memory means finding a computer to delete then reload them between power down/power up cycle, to clear memory.

 

I find it a very good idea to get a MicroSD card, 8G or better, depending upon your needs for maps, mostly, and keeping maps and pocket queries on it. If it looses track of things you only need to power down, remove batteries, MicroSD card, replace batteries, power up, power down, remove batteries, replace MicroSD, replace batteries and power up again, to recover - something you can do in the field, away from computer.

 

Interesting. I never had this happen on my 400t. I'll keep an eye out on my 600, but everything that I have on my 600, I'll also have on my Samsung Galaxy S4 and my Moto Xoom. I wonder if this issue comes up w/ .ggz files. I haven't had GSAK create these yet, but it seems to be good on a couple 10K+ .gpx files I've got loaded on the 600.

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Anyone with the Garmin Oregon 600t, can you confirm that it only has 300MB available on the device? I can easily run out of this, and I don't want to trust to using a uSD card on it. I'm thinking about going ahead and picking up a 600 instead of the 600t just because it has 1.5GB of available internal memory.

 

According to the Garmin Oregon 6xx Wiki (at http://garminoregon6xx.wikispaces.com/Hardware) the memory in the various models is as follows:

600 - 1.8GB total with 1.5GB free

600t - 3.6GB total with 809MB free

650 - 3.6GB total with 2.6GB free

650t - 7.2GB with 4GB free.

 

These figures are backed up by screenshots, but the t models will presumably vary a bit depending on which country's topo map is installed. The 650 models are still not released yet so the figures must be based on pre-production units.

 

The Oregon 6xx Wiki has a lot of other very useful answers to some of the questions being asked here, and is being created by early users.

 

Chris

 

A word of warning

 

I have had my Oregon 450, now Oregon 600, lose track of my loaded Geocaches. Keeping them on the internal memory means finding a computer to delete then reload them between power down/power up cycle, to clear memory.

 

I find it a very good idea to get a MicroSD card, 8G or better, depending upon your needs for maps, mostly, and keeping maps and pocket queries on it. If it looses track of things you only need to power down, remove batteries, MicroSD card, replace batteries, power up, power down, remove batteries, replace MicroSD, replace batteries and power up again, to recover - something you can do in the field, away from computer.

 

Interesting. I never had this happen on my 400t. I'll keep an eye out on my 600, but everything that I have on my 600, I'll also have on my Samsung Galaxy S4 and my Moto Xoom. I wonder if this issue comes up w/ .ggz files. I haven't had GSAK create these yet, but it seems to be good on a couple 10K+ .gpx files I've got loaded on the 600.

 

Would be interesting to know. I'm on the "old" version of GSAK. I take my PQs straight from zip to MicroSD/Garmin/GPX What is weird is seeing Waypoints show, but no caches.

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The ones who already tried 600 - what gps accuracy do you get ? I got mine few days ago and I'm quite disappointed - where etrex 30 shows 3-4 meters - 600 manages 12-13 meters at the best. Went to woods - and accuracy went to 30 (!) meters, etrex at the same place had 8 meters. Firmware is the latest available at the moment - 2.60.

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I have had my new Oregon 600 (replacement for Etrex Vista C and Colorado 400C) for 3 days and must say that I am very impressed so far. Satellite acquisition is always at least 3-4 bars in my house with 2 windows between my location and the outside. The screen visibility gets better the more direct sun that is on it, which is a blessing here in south FL. My Colorado was nearly invisible in direct sun.

 

I didn't notice the EPE, but it took me to within 2' of my last find. As I am using a Linux computer, I can't send direct to the 600, but simply drag and drop my PQ's into the GPX folder.

 

I have yet to experience any malfunctions or loss of data/waypoints/caches. It does take a bit of experimentation to become familiar with customizing the various Profiles and Dashboards. I am using Eneloop rechargeables and have yet to lose more than one bar even after hours of use. I did check for the latest firmware and found that my 600 was shipped with the latest version. (2.60)

 

I dropped in a Cities Navigator micro SD from my Colorado and it works perfectly although of course by now it is several years out of date. When in the Geocaching Profile, the map will show a direct route to the cache. In the Automotive Profile, it will use roads. (assuming you have an appropriate map chip installed).

 

I am still becoming familiar with all the various options, but as of now, I am very pleased with my purchase.

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The ones who already tried 600 - what gps accuracy do you get ? I got mine few days ago and I'm quite disappointed - where etrex 30 shows 3-4 meters - 600 manages 12-13 meters at the best. Went to woods - and accuracy went to 30 (!) meters, etrex at the same place had 8 meters. Firmware is the latest available at the moment - 2.60.

 

First make sure that you enable GPS+GLONASS sat's for best accuracy. Mine shipped with only GPS enabled (also enable WAAS/EGNOS.) This is quickly accessed by going to Setup -> System. That said, I think the reported accuracy numbers on the 600 seems to be vary pessimistic. It seems to be pretty spot on for me and not hopping around, that said I've only had it for 1 full day now. It seems to be more stable than my Garmin Oregon 400t so far.

Edited by TAZ427
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The ones who already tried 600 - what gps accuracy do you get ? I got mine few days ago and I'm quite disappointed - where etrex 30 shows 3-4 meters - 600 manages 12-13 meters at the best. Went to woods - and accuracy went to 30 (!) meters, etrex at the same place had 8 meters. Firmware is the latest available at the moment - 2.60.

Yes, I noticed the same unpleasant results. My eTrex 20 shows 10-15 feet accuracy, the Oregon 600 shows 30-50 feet accuracy. I am disappointed with the findings... but based on past performance, Garmin will tweak the firmware for many months to resolve most, but not all, glitches. I believe that GPS accuracy is high on their list of items to fix.

 

The eTrex20 and Oregon600 GPSr's are configured to receive both GPS & Glonass transmissions. Oregon firmware: 2.60. eTrex 20 firmware: 2.70

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I would ignore estimated accuracy numbers and try to test real accuracy and repeatibility. This is a more useful tests than estimate accuracy numbers:

 

Get thee to a known location. Some say it has to be USGS benchmark but that's not really needful - any fixed spot you can come back to over a period of many days is suitable for this casual test.

 

Put the GPS in place and get an averaged waypoint. Go back the next day and set another on the same spot. Repeat a few days in a row. Compare the various waypoints to each other. Try navigating to the waypoints the same way you would to a geocache.

 

Hw does your 600 seem by this measure?

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I second what user13371 said. The EPE doesn't really mean anything. I mean it does relative to the same GPS model but comparing between GPS models it holds little value. What parameters are used to calculate the values? Nobody knows and nobody will.

 

Consider this, let's say a more sensitive GPS unit receives more "noise" from bounced signals and jumps around more than a less sensitive GPS. Is the noise part of the equation? Is jumping around position-wise effecting the EPE number? All I'm saying is that depending on the equation used to calculate EPE, a more sensitive unit could have a higher EPE number. We simply don't know enough about the calculation to draw any conclusions between different Garmin models.

 

Between the same model sure, the antenna is the same, the processor is the same, and hence the signal reception and processing should also be the same and the calculation of EPE should ultimately be the same.

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