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New Garmin Oregon 600 Series

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What do older devices use for backlights?

 

Um, LED's :)

Actually, I think some of the older ones may have used small cold cathode fluorescent tubes, as did some of the early colour screen mobile phones. Cold cathode fluorescents have the dual disadvantages of being fragile and relatively power hungry.

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Actually, I think some of the older ones may have used small cold cathode fluorescent tubes, as did some of the early colour screen mobile phones. Cold cathode fluorescents have the dual disadvantages of being fragile and relatively power hungry.

 

Maybe, but ever since the 60C the darned things have been lit up by LED's. To tout this as a feature or to be enamored by the LED back-lighting is hilarious. :laughing: :laughing:

 

I can see touting the LED if Garmin used an Organic LED (O-LED) but they didn't.

 

Not a big deal I just find it funny. Movin' on.

Edited by yogazoo

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According to their news release:

 

The reflective display technology boosts touchscreen brightness so much, maps and displays are as vivid in full bright sunlight as they are in shade…Oregon uses the sun’s light to produce a display that is twice as bright compared to the previous models and works with many types of gloves.

 

So maybe it IS different to before :)

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The screen may be different but as far as I can tell the LED that is used for back lighting is the same.

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No one has mentioned battery life. I would have hoped that by now the battery life would have been improved over the older Oregon 400 series and I notice it has not. It quotes 16 hours, but based on the fact that my 450 also quotes 4 hours and actually delivers closer to 4 hours with high end batteries I am a little dismayed to see no expected improvement. If it is quoting the same 16 as the 450 I am assuming we can expect the usual 4 to 8 hours of the 450. My Montana on the other hand delivers way more than the stated battery life, often delivering well over 20 hours of use.

 

I do like the fact that the unit appears to have Bluetooth and I am hoping this means it will communicate with bluetooth enabled stereo systems in vehicles for turn by turn voice commands.

 

I will sit this one out until I can see there are none of the usual introductory issues such as screen recalls or almost unusable launch firmware.

 

Been very happy with my Oregon 450 and Montana, but would like the brighter screen of the 600 series and bluetooth if it delivers as expected.

 

A perfect unit for me and many others i know that use Garmins would be a unit right between the oregon and montana in screensize but much thinner than the montana.

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It looks like these new Oregons will have a belt clip option like the Colorado, 60CSx, etc. had. This is my major beef with the Montana; its shape precludes a simple button on the back for belt clip attachment.

 

The dual-touch screen makes me wonder if Garmin has started using more of the UI elements from smartphones. Like long-pressing, which can distinguish between two types of screen touching (short-press to select, long-press to edit). Or two-finger touch-and-twist to change map orientation.

 

I'm hoping they're slowly migrating to having an Android powered device in a tough, waterproof case. I could use my favorite Android geocaching app along with Garmin's great GPS hardware! And Google Maps for navigation!

 

Oh, wait, Garmin's maps are probably a huge source of profits. Never mind. Maybe I'll just get a GLO.

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"I'm hoping they're slowly migrating to having an Android powered device"

 

They've been there and cut it off before really starting.

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"I'm hoping they're slowly migrating to having an Android powered device"

 

They've been there and cut it off before really starting.

 

Oh, yeah, the GarminPhone. That didn't go so well. :laughing: I should've remembered that; I have a Nüvi 295W, which is essentially a GarminPhone without the Phone.

Edited by JJnTJ

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The videos look like Android, to me. I wonder if it is based on Android. Android is open source with Bluetooth and multi touch built in.

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I think some of the older ones may have used small cold cathode fluorescent tubes, as did some of the early colour screen mobile phones. Cold cathode fluorescents have the dual disadvantages of being fragile and relatively power hungry.

I think my old Magellan M330 used electroluminescent panel, similar to Timex's trademarked Indiglo and some nightlights I may still have around here. Very distinctive blue green shade, with a high pitched whine just on the edge of most folks' hearing.

 

 

"I SAID A DOUBLE! I may be blind but I 'ave acute 'earing!"

Edited by user13371

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I'm hoping the bluetooth connectivity will also allow other devices to use the GPS location info...like my wifi only iPad. That would be allow me to have a giant map in the car and a rugged but compact device to carry into the field.

Edited by Triple Crown

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6 things I want to know about the new Oregon 6xx series.

 

1) Will it have a night mode to reduce glare while viewing at night?

 

2) If it does have a night mode will the topo lines be white (annoying) or brown?

 

3) What is the minimum operating temperature of a capacitive screen? Will I be able to use it at -10F? -20F like I do my Montana?

 

4) How well will the new screen operate with gloves? Moisture? Low humidity? Dust/dirt?

 

5) Does it have the drop-down/retractable dashboard on the map screen like the Montana?

 

6) Will the new improved camera come with even the most basic functions? Digital camera options and features have been relatively lacking and basically an afterthought on Garmin handhelds with cameras. It seems reasonable Garmin could invest some time to add a shutter countdown timer, sepia, black and white, a low light option that actually improves picture quality in low light, etc. A few extremely basic options that every cruddy cell phone camera has.

 

With the revolution/evolution in smart phone GPS capabilities I hope Garmin would add as many features as possible in the software if I'm to pay nearly $500 for a dedicated GPS. I don't doubt the capability of the software engineers but I have to wonder how much of the software development is held back by market planning. In other words, how much is held back to add to the next model as a "feature".

 

The new Oregon 6xx series looks promising but, even as hopelessly addicted as I am to my positional intelligence, I'll probably reserve my judgement and my $$ until someone else answers the questions this time. Or until my money tree begins to bear fruit. :)

Edited by yogazoo

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yogazoo, I am right there with you. My Montana 650 gets it all done for me, although I would love to see some annoying bugs worked out and requested features added :)

 

I will have to acquire a new Oregon however, if only to complete the Oregon Wiki :)

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My Montana 650 gets it all done for me, although I would love to see some annoying bugs worked out and requested features added :)

 

The reason why you probably won't see those features added to the Montana 6xx is because Garmin is better off using those features to entice you into buying the next model.

 

It's the whole market planning thing. The reason Garmin can get away with it is because, at least in the handheld market, Garmin has no serious competition. Hence it zaps the motivation to push the envelope and develop these units as fully as possible. They would only be competing against themselves. Smart business for Garmin, disappointing for us.

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My Montana 650 gets it all done for me, although I would love to see some annoying bugs worked out and requested features added :)

 

The reason why you probably won't see those features added to the Montana 6xx is because Garmin is better off using those features to entice you into buying the next model.

 

It's the whole market planning thing. The reason Garmin can get away with it is because, at least in the handheld market, Garmin has no serious competition. Hence it zaps the motivation to push the envelope and develop these units as fully as possible. They would only be competing against themselves. Smart business for Garmin, disappointing for us.

 

It is amazing the number of handhelds Garmin continues to market, many new ones with features that ALMOST totally overlap existing ones. Some ancient ones like the yellow Etrex are still around while one of the most popular units of all time, the 60 CSx ( gold standard) gets dropped from the lineup and now demands huge bucks on the used market ( far more than they sold for new in some cases).

It is very frustrating how they abandon relatively new units to rush one to market for end users to beta test. I've never bought a unit as soon as it was offered......I waited a long time to buy a 450 and 62S and still jumped in a couple of firmware upgrades too soon.

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I do have to wonder just where the standalone GPS market (especially handheld units), as well as the point-and-shoot camera market is going. It sure seems as though they are both sliding into smartphone territory. It would be interesting to be a fly on the wall at Garmin (or any other GPS company for that matter) during their meetings. How long can they continue to be profitable on GPS units while things like the iPhone and Droid are eating into their sales? Their response is to create things like a GPS with a built-in crappy camera, etc. Or come up with OpenCaching, or buggy firmware, or poor map offerings with clunky software. They seem to be trying to do it all, while riding on their reputation/brand name instead of re-inventing themselves. Which is too bad, because they do/did make some excellent hardware.

 

Okay, I will climb down off my soapbox now. :smile:

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I do have to wonder just where the standalone GPS market (especially handheld units), as well as the point-and-shoot camera market is going. It sure seems as though they are both sliding into smartphone territory. It would be interesting to be a fly on the wall at Garmin (or any other GPS company for that matter) during their meetings. How long can they continue to be profitable on GPS units while things like the iPhone and Droid are eating into their sales? Their response is to create things like a GPS with a built-in crappy camera, etc. Or come up with OpenCaching, or buggy firmware, or poor map offerings with clunky software. They seem to be trying to do it all, while riding on their reputation/brand name instead of re-inventing themselves. Which is too bad, because they do/did make some excellent hardware.

 

Okay, I will climb down off my soapbox now. :smile:

 

For me handheld GPS wins over smartphone because it is rugged, I don't mind dropping it, I don't mind it getting dirty or wet, I don't mind operating it with dirty hands, the battery life is significantly higher than phones (plus you can always carry extra AA batteries).

 

I personally don't care about the trend of adding tons of extra features into GPS if it means higher price / worse firmware / more lockups, but if they can pull it off correctly why not.

 

I had my current GPS (60csx) for over 6 years and it's rock solid, never ever had any issues with it. I plan on getting new gps this year (most likely Oregon 600) and all this talk about newer models having firmware issues makes me a little worried.

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I had my current GPS (60csx) for over 6 years and it's rock solid, never ever had any issues with it. I plan on getting new gps this year (most likely Oregon 600) and all this talk about newer models having firmware issues makes me a little worried.

 

I hear ya'. Just the other day I was able to find a new Vista HCx on sale at a local store. I thought the BNIB stock had all but dried up on the older eTrex models. (Needless to say, it found a new home.) I still kick myself for getting rid of my 60Cx and for walking by those 60CSx's on sale for $199 at REI a couple of years ago!

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My Montana 650 gets it all done for me, although I would love to see some annoying bugs worked out and requested features added :)

 

The reason why you probably won't see those features added to the Montana 6xx is because Garmin is better off using those features to entice you into buying the next model.

 

It's the whole market planning thing. The reason Garmin can get away with it is because, at least in the handheld market, Garmin has no serious competition. Hence it zaps the motivation to push the envelope and develop these units as fully as possible. They would only be competing against themselves. Smart business for Garmin, disappointing for us.

 

Yes, we all purchased Oregon x00 and x50 units when new, and beta tested the firmwares for more than two years while Garmin ironed out all the kinks, and most of the features we requested for the Oregon were provided to us, in the form of the Montana.... I would not be surprised to see many of the requested features for the current Montana 6xx series included in a new & improved version of the same.

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How long can they continue to be profitable on GPS units while things like the iPhone and Droid are eating into their sales?

 

There is a separate market for GPS units that is apart from smartphone use. The two markets probably won't eclipse for some time to come. Overlap sure but total eclipse is far off.

 

I personally don't care about the trend of adding tons of extra features into GPS if it means higher price / worse firmware / more lockups, but if they can pull it off correctly why not.

 

For me adding useless features and frivolous bells and whistles is BS. The features I'm talking about are things like the "Vertical Dist To Dest" data field (very useful) that they deemed fit for the Montana but nothing else. Things like that, firmware things, that could have and should have been retroactive on all models that drives me crazy. Garmin does make some excellent products however and they are usually solidly built and you can tell some though went behind the design and materials (the Colorado being the exception :)).

 

I'm excited about the new Oregon series but I'm happy enough with my Montana (Garmin should have given me something to desire) that I'll let it come to market and mature a bit or even wait until the Montana series get's it's GLONASS (probably next year if not early summer Q2).

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How long can they continue to be profitable on GPS units while things like the iPhone and Droid are eating into their sales?

 

There is a separate market for GPS units that is apart from smartphone use. The two markets probably won't eclipse for some time to come. Overlap sure but total eclipse is far off.

 

I personally don't care about the trend of adding tons of extra features into GPS if it means higher price / worse firmware / more lockups, but if they can pull it off correctly why not.

 

For me adding useless features and frivolous bells and whistles is BS. The features I'm talking about are things like the "Vertical Dist To Dest" data field (very useful) that they deemed fit for the Montana but nothing else. Things like that, firmware things, that could have and should have been retroactive on all models that drives me crazy. Garmin does make some excellent products however and they are usually solidly built and you can tell some though went behind the design and materials (the Colorado being the exception :)).

 

I'm excited about the new Oregon series but I'm happy enough with my Montana (Garmin should have given me something to desire) that I'll let it come to market and mature a bit or even wait until the Montana series get's it's GLONASS (probably next year if not early summer Q2).

 

I'm really torn between buying Oregon 600 or Montana, I do love the idea of super big screen but I really want Glonass. I think that as long as I never use Montana I won't really miss the large screen, from what I hear everyone that got used to it can't go back now :) I won't purchase my new GPS until April/May so perhaps another device will be announced by then.

 

Also, I thought about selling 60csx to help cover the cost of the new unit but now I'm thinking I'll just hold on to it as a reliable backup.

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If it were my choice, and having seen how much more accurate my Etrex 20 is with GLONASS, I'd take GLONASS over the bigger screen any day.

Edited by sussamb

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If it were my choice, and having seen how much more accurate my Etrex 20 is with GLONASS

Why would GLONASS make a difference? More satellites? Better satellites?

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I do have to wonder just where the standalone GPS market (especially handheld units), as well as the point-and-shoot camera market is going. It sure seems as though they are both sliding into smartphone territory. It would be interesting to be a fly on the wall at Garmin (or any other GPS company for that matter) during their meetings. How long can they continue to be profitable on GPS units while things like the iPhone and Droid are eating into their sales? Their response is to create things like a GPS with a built-in crappy camera, etc. Or come up with OpenCaching, or buggy firmware, or poor map offerings with clunky software. They seem to be trying to do it all, while riding on their reputation/brand name instead of re-inventing themselves. Which is too bad, because they do/did make some excellent hardware.

 

Okay, I will climb down off my soapbox now. :smile:

 

For me handheld GPS wins over smartphone because it is rugged, I don't mind dropping it, I don't mind it getting dirty or wet, I don't mind operating it with dirty hands, the battery life is significantly higher than phones (plus you can always carry extra AA batteries).

 

I personally don't care about the trend of adding tons of extra features into GPS if it means higher price / worse firmware / more lockups, but if they can pull it off correctly why not.

 

I think this is a good point. So much of the time we're offered a couple of new bells and whistles but the cost of upgrading hardware, especially at the high end of the market, is such that I for one want a lot more than a couple of doodads to justify retiring one $500+ unit and replacing it with another.

 

For me when I look at new firmware for my Montana I look to see if it has features I want (which includes "bugs I want fixed"). If not, no need to upgrade. If it does, the next question is whether it introduces any new bugs I don't want to live with. If so, I don't upgrade. I'm still running 3.6.3 on my Montana because from what people say later versions seem to have introduced bugs that would make me want to throw my Montana in the river.

 

I had my current GPS (60csx) for over 6 years and it's rock solid, never ever had any issues with it. I plan on getting new gps this year (most likely Oregon 600) and all this talk about newer models having firmware issues makes me a little worried.

 

My wife still uses my old 60CSx which has been going for almost 7 years now. My Montana has served me well for 15 months and counting, and I hope it will be many years before I feel a sufficient urge to replace it that I reach for my credit card.

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Eloquent points tisri.

 

Regarding the GLONASS addition; from the tests I've seen on a very prominent GPS review website :anibad: there doesn't seem to be much improvement in accuracy (if any). I've also compared tracklogs taken with my Montana and a friends eTrex20 and I didn't see any improvement, even in urban canyons. So the GLONASS addition, at least for me, is "Eh".

Edited by yogazoo

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If it were my choice, and having seen how much more accurate my Etrex 20 is with GLONASS

Why would GLONASS make a difference? More satellites? Better satellites?

 

I don't know why ... I just know it does :)

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If it were my choice, and having seen how much more accurate my Etrex 20 is with GLONASS, I'd take GLONASS over the bigger screen any day.

Here in Canada (Ontario), I haven't noticed any appreciable difference in accuracy with GLONASS enabled. But I've read other reports like yours (also from the UK) that it makes a significant difference. When locating a cache, are you closer to GZ than you were without it, or are coordinates more accurate when placing a cache?

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Seems to get me right on top of the cache pretty much every time, far far more than my Etrex Legend H ever did.

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Seems to get me right on top of the cache pretty much every time, far far more than my Etrex Legend H ever did.

Thanks for your reply. I'm always looking for ways to reduce the number of blue, sad faces I've been logging lately, lol.

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I've got an Etrex 30, and sometimes I can be stood right on top of a cache, BUT if the person who put the cache out uses a GPS without glonass, or worse still an iPhone, then however good your gps is, the co-ordinates won't match exactly !

 

Anyway. I'm looking forward to the new Oregon 600. It looks great. Pleased I didn't rush to get a Oregan 400. I nearly did last week !

Edited by TheHillWalkers

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It amazes me that anyone would judge a GPSr’s accuracy by how close it puts them to a cache or the reported accuracy of the GPSr. Find an adjusted benchmark and then you can check your accuracy. The accuracy of any measuring device can only be quantified with a certified, traceable standard.

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...For me adding useless features and frivolous bells and whistles is BS....

Hey, are you the same yogazoo who several posts earlier wanted to know if the GPS camera would be able to do sepia-toned images and other effects? :D

 

One person's frivolous bells and whistles are another's necessities.

Edited by user13371

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...For me adding useless features and frivolous bells and whistles is BS....

Hey, are you the same yogazoo who several posts earlier wanted to know if the GPS camera would be able to do sepia-toned images and other effects? :D

 

One person's frivolous bells and whistles are another's necessities.

 

That's me! :)

 

We'll, let me justify my frivolous desires this way. All I'm asking from an 8MP digital camera is to have perhaps some of the features my 6 year old, 2MP dumb-phone has. So in this case it's not a matter of wanting frivolous extras rather than a frustration that the crappy camera from the better part of a decade ago is more versatile and has more features (and can take a timed shutter release photo) than a "cutting edge", modern piece of equipment.

 

So when my wife and I are out hiking and she say's "hey honey, that's a great vista, get your camera out and set it on that rock so we can get a photo of the both of us." I won't have to respond, "Um, sorry the Camera on my $600 GPS doesn't take timed shutter release photo's. Let's just use ANY crappy cell camera that we got for free from the past decade to get the picture."

 

I know at least some Garmin software engineers read these forums. Doesn't my above scenario sound ridiculous? How am I supposed to justify another $500 for a new Garmin unit to my wife when her modern smartphone is constantly usurping my Garmin GPS??? :lol:

 

Getting back to the original point about one persons frivolous is another persons feature. You make a great point. I tend to get crochity-old-man syndrome when discussing GPS. But that's exactly what I mean about extra stuff they include in the next model and call it a feature. So, as a hypothetical, the next Oregon will include "Advanced Camera Options" as a selling point. So yes, the camera options are indeed the frivolous stuff I'm talking about that's added as some kind of breakthrough but in actuality it's not. I hope my logic isn't getting too circular here.

Edited by yogazoo

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Upon eventual release of this unit, I'll be curious about these things:

 

1) Has the track and odometer recording method been modified to NOT include straight-line connections between power cycles?

2) Does the display have a night time option?

3) Can the master odometer be reset without a hard reset?

4) Can accumulated elevation and trip odometer be reset independently of one another?

5) Will wireless transfer work properly?

6) Will waypoint management work properly?

 

Also does anyone know, will this new advertised display look like the i-Phone? If so, that will make for a nice image. I find the oregon 450 hard to read and not have a very responsive touch screen.

 

Depending on these issues will determine if it's worth selling off the 450 for an upgrade.

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Seems to get me right on top of the cache pretty much every time, far far more than my Etrex Legend H ever did.

Thanks for your reply. I'm always looking for ways to reduce the number of blue, sad faces I've been logging lately, lol.

 

Just remember though, if the cache was placed using a regular GPS, or an iPhone, etc. the coordinates are only as good as what it was placed with. Having a more accurate GPS will get you to the *GIVEN* coordinates better, but that doesn't mean it will get you to the actual cache location better.

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Upon eventual release of this unit, I'll be curious about these things:

 

1) Has the track and odometer recording method been modified to NOT include straight-line connections between power cycles?

 

I certainly hope NOT, because that's exactly how it's supposed to work! .....and exactly how you have told it to work with your specific settings.

 

If you want to minimize that action, then change your settings.

What do you have your "auto archive" setting on?

Do you "clear current track" before logging a portion of track that is important?

 

So as not to hijack this thread, discussion on this topic should be in a new post.

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If it were my choice, and having seen how much more accurate my Etrex 20 is with GLONASS

Why would GLONASS make a difference? More satellites? Better satellites?

My take is that they take the 4 satellites out of available ones that give best geometry for accuracy. The more satellites the more probability you get a good set. Its all probability, in my opinion. My GLONASS Samsung Galaxy Note seems better, but accuracy varies like any GPSr..

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More red meat. Another video, about as limited in value as the first two but hey, beggars can't be choosers. Taken at the "Shot Show" apparently an outdoors/hunters themed gear show. I still wonder if anyone stopped by the Garmin booth at the CES 2013 show or did they not have an Oregon 600 there. Maybe they had a gag order on pictures because there is NOTHING out there from CES about it.

 

 

 

ADDED AFTER WATCHING:

 

Did you catch his quote on battery life?? He's either stretching it a bit or it's a good sign.

 

The map redraw speed still hasn't impressed me in any video I've seen. No faster than the Montana even with the Montana having a larger screen to draw.

 

 

ADDED AFTER WATCHING THE 5TH TIME:

 

That guys has never been to a "duck blind or deer stand" in his life. :)

 

 

ADDED AFTER WATCHING THE 10TH TIME:

 

Screen redraws may not be quicker than a Montana but if you watch closely it draws a bit different. The norm is for the vector stuff to draw first followed a half second later with a scrolling type of draw for the terrain shading. The vector graphics and terrain shader appear married in the scrolling done by old Ted. Hmmm.

Edited by yogazoo

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Seems to get me right on top of the cache pretty much every time, far far more than my Etrex Legend H ever did.

Thanks for your reply. I'm always looking for ways to reduce the number of blue, sad faces I've been logging lately, lol.

 

Just remember though, if the cache was placed using a regular GPS, or an iPhone, etc. the coordinates are only as good as what it was placed with. Having a more accurate GPS will get you to the *GIVEN* coordinates better, but that doesn't mean it will get you to the actual cache location better.

 

Not only what device it was placed with, but how thorough the user was obtaining the coordinates.

 

$700 GPSr + "Mark Waypoint" still = crappy coordinates. 😉

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Seems like a nice unit. One thing that caught my attention (if I read it right) is the rechargeable NiMH batteries can be charged in the device...does that mean you can just plug in the 600 to recharge? That would be a nice feature.

 

Also, someone mentioned a belt clip. Judging from the pics, I don't believe that's a belt clip. Looks similar to the arrangement on the back of the Oregon 450/550 series, which is just the locking mechanism for the battery cover. I could be wrong though.

 

Finally, in advertising the unit's ability to store "unlimimted caches" they mention that you can download "every cache from Opencaching.com"....I think my Oregon 550 can hold that many :rolleyes:

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Just watched the video Yogazoo posted...Sounds like it has a built in flash for the camera. I wonder if that will also be able to function as a flashlight from within the Geocaching (or any other) profile? That would also be a cool feature.

 

Also, pet peeve of mine....I hate it when someone is touting a new smartphone or other gadget and says it has a "megapixel camera". That doesn't tell me anything...is it one megapixel or 8 megapixels? :rolleyes:

 

Not enough here to make me trade in my 550, though....

Edited by Chief301

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Seems to get me right on top of the cache pretty much every time, far far more than my Etrex Legend H ever did.

Thanks for your reply. I'm always looking for ways to reduce the number of blue, sad faces I've been logging lately, lol.

 

Just remember though, if the cache was placed using a regular GPS, or an iPhone, etc. the coordinates are only as good as what it was placed with. Having a more accurate GPS will get you to the *GIVEN* coordinates better, but that doesn't mean it will get you to the actual cache location better.

 

Not only what device it was placed with, but how thorough the user was obtaining the coordinates.

 

$700 GPSr + "Mark Waypoint" still = crappy coordinates.

 

Very true, but it seems that most caches I visit have their coords pretty much spot on, or the COs GPS and my Etrex 20 are constantly out the same distance and in the same direction :)

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Just watched the video Yogazoo posted...Sounds like it has a built in flash for the camera. I wonder if that will also be able to function as a flashlight from within the Geocaching (or any other) profile? That would also be a cool feature.

 

Also, pet peeve of mine....I hate it when someone is touting a new smartphone or other gadget and says it has a "megapixel camera". That doesn't tell me anything...is it one megapixel or 8 megapixels? :rolleyes:

 

Not enough here to make me trade in my 550, though....

 

The charging batteries were introduced with the Montana. It does allow you to put in regular batteries if they run out in the field.

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Just watched the video Yogazoo posted...Sounds like it has a built in flash for the camera. I wonder if that will also be able to function as a flashlight from within the Geocaching (or any other) profile? That would also be a cool feature.

 

Also, pet peeve of mine....I hate it when someone is touting a new smartphone or other gadget and says it has a "megapixel camera". That doesn't tell me anything...is it one megapixel or 8 megapixels? :rolleyes:

 

Not enough here to make me trade in my 550, though....

 

Yes, flash and it has a flashlight function built into the software.

 

Yes, charging in the unit.

 

You can use a belt clip with any of the devices that have the rail if you purchase the belt clip attachment. The complaints are because the Montana does not have the rail, so can't accept the belt clip.

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Can you put this rechargeable battery in the Etrex 30??? I'm pretty sure that when you plug the USB into a wall it try's to recharge the batteries.

Edited by TheHillWalkers

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Can you put this rechargeable battery in the Etrex 30??? I'm pretty sure that when you plug the USB into a wall it try's to recharge the batteries.

No, the Etrex will not try and recharge the batteries.

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Not enough here to make me trade in my 550, though....

Feel the same way about my 450. Even considering, but not yet seriously, a new 550. Amazon's price for the 550 is approaching $250, that's less than a 450.

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