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I must choose between two GPSs


wvsky
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Hello! First, let me say that I'm not into geocaching right now but some of my friends are. I may get into it later, but I have an immediate problem concerning GPS's:

 

I will soon be going into the woods alone on a 4 wheeler to take photos. This will be something I'll be doing for several years. There is no cell service available and so as back up I'll be taking two things: A portable CB radio and a GPS.

 

I have ordered two GPS's because the first one was regular price and something I could afford. Then, a few days later a more expensive model appeared, and at the same price as the first. The first one has arrived, the second one will arrive in a day or two.

 

Here's what I've got: 1... a Garmin GPSMAP 62 Handheld GPS Navigator.

 

2.... a Garmin Oregon 550T 3-Inch Handheld GPS Navigator with 3.2MP Digital Camera ( Loaded with U.S. Topographic Maps)"

 

I've read all the reviews on both units, and like everything else, they both have their pros and cons. Since they both cost exactly the same price, I'd like your opinion on which I should keep. I will use the GPS "mostly" to find my way back from deep in the woods, and also to set waypoints so that I can return to a certain area.

 

Since you guys probably know more about these units, with all your real time hands-on experience, I trust your opinion more than just the reviews I've read. And I also know that even here, there will probably be a difference of opinion on these two units, but I'll take all the information afforded me.

 

Thanks! :D

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Between those two units, the biggest difference is the button vs touch screen input methods, and since the Oregon has no buttons, it has more room for the larger, higher resolution screen.

 

They will both accomplish what you want.

 

I personally would go with the Oregon (I have four of them) over the 62s.

 

Read all about the Oregon here.

 

Make sure you update it to latest firmware AFTER you make a complete back-up.

Edited by Atlas Cached
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I will be wearing gloves half the time, but I'd naturally take them off to operate the GPS. But the buttons vs the screen is something I'm concerned with. I mean, I cant see having any physical issues, carrying around the touch screen GPS... unless there's something I haven't thought of.

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also consider accidental touches of the screen on the 550t....

 

Conversely, accidental touches of the bulky buttons on the 62s.....

 

Of course, the Oregon does have a screen lock when you need it, just like the 62s has a button lock...

 

I get so tired of hearing people trash talk the touch screen GPS units.... In case nobody has noticed... EVERYTHING is going to touchscreen since.... well, since the iPhone.... Get used to it!

Edited by Atlas Cached
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My only problem with touch screen GPSrs are when it gets wet or your hads are cold, they don't respond very well. Ever try to mess with your smartphone in the rain? The touch screen will not respond to touches.

 

I tried both and like the 62s in the cold and rain and I can use my phone, Samsung Galaxy S III, if I want to when it's nice out and the accuracy is pretty good (within 10 feet).

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My only problem with touch screen GPSrs are when it gets wet or your hads are cold, they don't respond very well. Ever try to mess with your smartphone in the rain? The touch screen will not respond to touches.

 

I tried both and like the 62s in the cold and rain and I can use my phone, Samsung Galaxy S III, if I want to when it's nice out and the accuracy is pretty good (within 10 feet).

 

laker91, the touch screens that you find non-responsive when wet or your hands are cold are capacitive type screens, which sense your fingers through the glass via conductance.

 

Garmin handheld GPS units use resistive type screens, which are well suited for use in more hostile environments or where the user may be wearing gloves, etc.

 

laker91, I am afraid your argument that the Oregon will not function well in the rain while the 62s will, well, doesn't hold any water.

 

Please do not post misleading information about things which you do not understand.

 

See, this is the kind of information that's not typically in the reviews. :blink:

 

And, while we are at it, let's try and get it right, shall we?

Edited by Atlas Cached
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My only problem with touch screen GPSrs are when it gets wet or your hads are cold, they don't respond very well. Ever try to mess with your smartphone in the rain? The touch screen will not respond to touches.

 

I tried both and like the 62s in the cold and rain and I can use my phone, Samsung Galaxy S III, if I want to when it's nice out and the accuracy is pretty good (within 10 feet).

As one who travels back country, out of cellular coverage, in a 4WD, may I suggest the DeLorme inReach device. It will pair with your Galaxy phone to send and receive SMS via Iridium Satellite System when beyond cell service.

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I appreciate that, but I've already purchased these two units, and one I will send back. And oh... I don't own a Smart Phone and probably never will. I've always been on the cutting edge of technology, but I draw the line at Smart phones, at least until they offer unlimited for $20 a month. ;)

Edited by wvsky
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My only problem with touch screen GPSrs are when it gets wet or your hads are cold, they don't respond very well. Ever try to mess with your smartphone in the rain? The touch screen will not respond to touches.

 

I tried both and like the 62s in the cold and rain and I can use my phone, Samsung Galaxy S III, if I want to when it's nice out and the accuracy is pretty good (within 10 feet).

 

Yes but any pen or similar item will work as a stylus.

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First off, the notion that the touch screens on Garmin's work any differently in the cold or wet is rubbish. This photo was taken during a blizzard where temperatures were below zero and snow covered the screen. The touchscreen worked flawlessly, even with gloves on. Your smartphone only wishes.

 

Secondly, I've owned both models and sold my 62. Touchscreen is the wave of the future. Buttons, to me, feel extremely clunky.

 

1354082542.jpg

Edited by yogazoo
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First off, the notion that the touch screens on Garmin's work any differently in the cold or wet is rubbish. This photo was taken during a blizzard where temperatures were below zero and snow covered the screen. The touchscreen worked flawlessly, even with gloves on. Your smartphone only wishes.

 

Secondly, I've owned both models and sold my 62. Touchscreen is the wave of the future. Buttons, to me, feel extremely clunky.

 

1354082542.jpg

 

Nice looking rifle... what is it? B)

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Some quick comments:

 

You've already ordered both and will be sending one back? Don't listen to ANYBODY he on which one is better. Test both of them yourself. With and without gloves. in varying lighting conditions from darkness to full sun. Then keep the one YOU like. Both are e cell end GPSRs, so it's all going to come down to which screen you like and if you prefer buttons vs touchscreen.

 

Re "not buying a smartphone until unlimited everything is $20/month" that would be Republic Wireless -- but I have no idea how good the GPS is in their single phone offering.

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First off, the notion that the touch screens on Garmin's work any differently in the cold or wet is rubbish.

 

1354082542.jpg

 

Yes

Resistive touchscreens generally work okay in cold or wet; may actually be less prone to errors than some physical button configurations due to the fact that there is no place for water intrusion which can then freeze and stick the button.

Edited by tr_s
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Hello! First, let me say that I'm not into geocaching right now but some of my friends are. I may get into it later, but I have an immediate problem concerning GPS's:

 

I will soon be going into the woods alone on a 4 wheeler to take photos. This will be something I'll be doing for several years. There is no cell service available and so as back up I'll be taking two things: A portable CB radio ....

What has been failed to address above is the uselessness of CB radios (sooooo '70's) for emergency communications in the back country.

 

For radio communications in rural areas today the most reliable choice is using satellite telephone systems, primarily the Globalstar and the Iridium systems. For the Iridium system, there are two choices, the handheld phone unit itself or one of the two DeLorme inReach devices. One of these devices communicates in conjunction with a smart cellular phone, either iOS or Android, whild the other inReach device works with the DeLorme PN-60w GPSr. If you choose the latter, Ebay your other GPSrs.

 

Check these:

http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=delorme+inreach&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid=7281075848&hvpos=1t3&hvexid=475568&hvnetw=s&hvrand=1357533003736948636&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=e&ref=pd_sl_8dqcskxxj4_e

Edited by Team CowboyPapa
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I purchased the 62st recently and took it out for a 9 mile geo caching adventure. While I like the unit very much in general, it has one major problem. Like any hiking GPS, the 62st will record your track as you hike, letting you upload it to your computer when you return home. This is very useful for keeping track of your adventures. The accuracy of the 62st's GPS , combined with its barometric altimeter, lets you accurately record your track for later use.

Edited by jacklance
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Some quick comments:

 

You've already ordered both and will be sending one back?

 

As much as I'd like to, I wont take a chance on playing with them both and then sending one back just to have them tell me it's now a used unit and so no refund.

You just cant count on all dealers being liberal with their return policies, so I want to do little more than take them out of the box and look at them.

 

Thanks!

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What has been failed to address above is the uselessness of CB radios (sooooo '70's) for emergency communications in the back country.

 

In most locations I would agree, but in my area, they are still used. Anything to do with satellites are way out of my price range anyway. I'm trying to go in as cheap as possible. And before anyone says "and cheap will get you killed", I was one of the founders of "Bridge Day" where we jump off the New River Gorge bridge. I'm not overly concerned with dying... it's that WAIT that bother me. :lol:

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Some quick comments:

 

You've already ordered both and will be sending one back?

 

As much as I'd like to, I wont take a chance on playing with them both and then sending one back just to have them tell me it's now a used unit and so no refund.

You just cant count on all dealers being liberal with their return policies, so I want to do little more than take them out of the box and look at them.

 

Thanks!

 

Good Call.

 

Garmin GPSr units record their location internally with date/time stamp the first time they are turned on - This information is used to determine warranty status of the device.

 

If you use them, and send one back, the person who eventually buys it may have trouble with a warranty claim later.

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I purchased the 62st recently and took it out for a 9 mile geo caching adventure. While I like the unit very much in general, it has one major problem. Like any hiking GPS, the 62st will record your track as you hike, letting you upload it to your computer when you return home. This is very useful for keeping track of your adventures. The accuracy of the 62st's GPS , combined with its barometric altimeter, lets you accurately record your track for later use.

 

I dont see the problem you were going to mention? Keep in mind that my unit is a Garmin GPSMAP 62 Handheld GPS Navigator. Just a 62. I'm still trying to understand all the different models but it doesnt matter at this point because I will be choosing one of the two that I've bought.

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...I wont take a chance on playing with them both and then sending one back just to have them tell me it's now a used unit and so no refund.
Guess it depends who you buy from. REI and quite a few other resellers make a point of no-hassle return policies. That's often why I'll buy from these kind of places rather than going for the absolute lowest price.

 

Who'd you order through?

Edited by user13371
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My only problem with touch screen GPSrs are when it gets wet or your hads are cold, they don't respond very well. Ever try to mess with your smartphone in the rain? The touch screen will not respond to touches.

 

I tried both and like the 62s in the cold and rain and I can use my phone, Samsung Galaxy S III, if I want to when it's nice out and the accuracy is pretty good (within 10 feet).

 

I don't use my smartphone in the rain if I can help it, as it's not designed to be waterproof.

 

My Garmin Montana on the other hand, I've used that while cycling in a downpour and it worked just fine. The only problem I had was having to keep wiping the rain off.

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Some quick comments:

 

You've already ordered both and will be sending one back?

 

As much as I'd like to, I wont take a chance on playing with them both and then sending one back just to have them tell me it's now a used unit and so no refund.

You just cant count on all dealers being liberal with their return policies, so I want to do little more than take them out of the box and look at them.

 

Thanks!

 

Good Call.

 

Garmin GPSr units record their location internally with date/time stamp the first time they are turned on - This information is used to determine warranty status of the device.

 

If you use them, and send one back, the person who eventually buys it may have trouble with a warranty claim later.

 

I'd have thought the person who eventually buys it would have a receipt to show exactly when they bought it. It's hard to imagine a company refusing to honour a warranty for someone who bought an item but subsequently found out someone in the shop turned it on a few months before selling it.

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I'd have thought the person who eventually buys it would have a receipt to show exactly when they bought it. It's hard to imagine a company refusing to honour a warranty for someone who bought an item but subsequently found out someone in the shop turned it on a few months before selling it.

 

If you always keep your receipts (not everyone does), you should be OK. I had one unit I did not have my receipt for, and they used the start-up date in the unit to determine warranty status.

 

Funny thing is, that date/time was two months before I purchased it from an online retailer. I sent (dated) emails from that retailer confirming my purchase to Garmin and they honored the warranty.

 

This is the only reason I am aware of this procedure.

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I bought both units from Amazon. The second one shipped today and will arrive in a few days. It appears that the difference between the touch screen and the buttons isnt a big issue. As the largest screen possible is very important to me, I was leaning towards the touch screen if possible.

 

The other issue was that since they're both the same price, (the touch screen being reduced drastically for a one day Christmas sale) I also assumed that I would get more usable features from the normally more expensive touch screen. I paid extra for Topo maps to be preloaded and still both units are close in price.

 

If no one has anything really negative to say about the Oregon 550T, I think I'll go ahead and send the 62 back.

 

Thanks for all your help!

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One thing to never forget... No matter how confident you are in the CB radio and fancy the GPS...they are battery operated and they are useless when the batts die.

Always start with fresh batteries and carry spares. I make sure my flashlight, GPS and everything else possible uses the same size battery so I can swap in addition to carrying a spare set.

 

There is no technology more reliable than a map and compass. Get both and know how to use them.

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wvsky,

 

As to the "which unit....will work on an ATV".....I do the same thing. Handlebar mount. Though I have never used either of the units you've got, I do use a Garmin 60csx (simular form as the 62) and have no complaints. Works great, easy to see and manipulate. The only suggestion I'd offer (if you use either) is to make sure you use a lanyard and loop it through the handlebars. That way, if the GPS did dislodge from the mount, it won't fall to the ground....or under the wheels. :)

 

As to the CB.....During daylight hours they are almost useless. "Skip" from the upper atmosphere smothers the receiver with radio noise from all over the world. At night they work better for flagging down someone who might be monitoring on a base station. I would personally prefer a little FRS transceiver. Small and can be heard "line of sight" from rather long distances. I have one that can scan all available freqs. You'd be amazed at how many folks I can listen to while out in the boonies. In my area I'd venture the FRS would be more effective.

 

I have to mention that a CB did save my bacon once, back in the 80's. Stuck the truck in a huge mud hole on a cold dark night. Luckily, I did catch some night owl CB'er on a base. He called my bro to come help me out.

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Thanks for everyone's help! I was into CB big time back in the early to mid 70s. Had 3 radios and 3 towers. That fad lasted about 4 years for me and haven't touched one since.

 

I will never mount any electronics on my ATV due to the terrain and the way I ride. I will keep the GPS either in my pocket or around my neck on a lanyard.

 

I do have one more question however: Since there's no buttons on the 550T, do the options appear on the screen as soon as you touch it? And when they ARE on the screen, do they take up real estate over top of the map? (seems they'd have to) and so block what you're looking at?

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My only problem with touch screen GPSrs are when it gets wet or your hads are cold, they don't respond very well. Ever try to mess with your smartphone in the rain? The touch screen will not respond to touches.

 

I tried both and like the 62s in the cold and rain and I can use my phone, Samsung Galaxy S III, if I want to when it's nice out and the accuracy is pretty good (within 10 feet).

Cold, inclement weather impacting touchscreen operability?

 

Check these:

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