Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 8
Mike & Jess

Most Finds in 1 Day

Recommended Posts

Who has the lowest number as their maximum in one day. I submit mine of 17. (That is in a 24h period, not a callender day)

 

33 for me in a 24 hour period (about 8 hours of actual caching). I'm currently at .19 caches per day over the last year.

 

To me, it's not about the numbers, it's about the memories. I can remember very few of those caches I found on that 33 cache day. I've only found 70 caches this year but I can remember most of them as they include finds in 5 different countries and include a FTF was was almost 9400 miles from home.

But you said it is not about the numbers. Like me, it appears that for you it is not about large find numbers, but you can't really say it is not about the numbers. It is just different numbers.

Share this post


Link to post

Who has the lowest number as their maximum in one day. I submit mine of 17. (That is in a 24h period, not a callender day)

 

33 for me in a 24 hour period (about 8 hours of actual caching). I'm currently at .19 caches per day over the last year.

 

To me, it's not about the numbers, it's about the memories. I can remember very few of those caches I found on that 33 cache day. I've only found 70 caches this year but I can remember most of them as they include finds in 5 different countries and include a FTF was was almost 9400 miles from home.

But you said it is not about the numbers. Like me, it appears that for you it is not about large find numbers, but you can't really say it is not about the numbers. It is just different numbers.

 

True, but whenever anyone writes "it's not about the numbers" it usually means "it's not about increasing one particular number to a high value".

Share this post


Link to post

My wife and I went to the ET highway and I did all the driving, where she did all the jumping out and signing. Our best day was 450 caches in about 10 hours. No cheating involved. No young folks running, just us.

Day 1 150

Day 2 425

Day 3 225

Day 4 450

Day 5 250+extras

 

Will we do it again? Probably not, but when they added 500 more, we did take 2 days to grab those as well a few months later.

Share this post


Link to post

we did the first half of rte 66 series, 479 caches starting at Kelbaker rd and heading west towards Barstow.

We hit this one GC1PRKV about 5:30 am and finished with this one GC2TMWB about 6:30 pm just the 2 of us and all the logs were signed by myself

:lol: And we did it backwards

Edited by vagabond

Share this post


Link to post

Unless I'm mistaken, the Most Finds in a Single Day record is all of them, currently held by HarryKrishna.

 

He doesn't always sign the log, and he normally doesn't log his finds on the site, but he uses the Divine Power of Transcendental Meditation to find caches anywhere without being bogged down by time and distance.

Share this post


Link to post

62 on an 11 mile hike with a 2800' gain.

116 in a car with a team. All logs signed and caches returned to their proper locations.

114 in a car, solo. (106 ET caches)

 

Those are my World Records.

Share this post


Link to post

Our best ever *was* 19 in one day. It involved over 7 miles of walking on the MatSu Greenbelt trails.

 

But this last 10 days we flew into Palm Springs and then drove to Vegas for a week. Going there we did two caches on the Route 66 power trail near Amboy. We would've done more, but we were in a hurry to get to Primm before sunset (via the Mojave National Preserve). And the wife wasn't too sure if this power trail thing would be any fun...

 

We had talked about running up and doing some of the ET Highway, but we just ran out of time.

 

So, on the way back to Palm Springs, I notice a short power trail off of I-15 on Yermo Road. We had some time, so I figured we'd do a few. Once we got going, we really enjoyed it. We stopped at each cache and signed each log. Some we spotted before we even got the car stopped, others took a few moments, and there was even a few we didn't find.

 

In an hour and a half we did 33 caches. Would I hit another power trail again? Sure... They are fun. Is there more to caching than power trails and seeing how many caches you can do in a day? Of course!!!

Share this post


Link to post

When I see anyone with alot of finds (800 or more) in one day. I think of stamping a "*" beside their screen name. <_<

Good thing I dont have any 800+ days, I wouldn't want a stamped "*" by my name. Whatever that means. :laughing:

 

When you put an Asterisk beside someones name, it means they may had cheated. Questionable cheaters get 'em as well. :laughing: :laughing: :laughing: :laughing: :laughing:

 

What's next??? Drug testing?? This activity was much better before the introduction of steroids.

Share this post


Link to post

I've enjoyed people's descriptions of their single-day finds to the point of creating a challenge cache for that, knowing of all the debate surrounding what constitutes finds in a day, and the wide variety of strategies making it hard to "crown" anyone with a legitimate, agreed-upon record...

So my challenge cache is my way of hopefully providing a sandboxed ruleset for highlighting various strategies while providing a new challenge for everyone (this was published before the no-date-restriction was put in place), while still allowing smileys/finds by geocaching rules (verifiable in the user's statistics)

 

Interestingly, the top scorers so far abiding by the cache ruleset (1 car, but leapfrogging allowed) didn't leap-frog, but used a strategy where the vehicle visited each cache (w/in 1-50ft) and each individual had a role to play in the team effort. That's a respectable accumulation, IMO, and accomplished via the ET powertrail.

Another strategy rewarded a very large group over 400 finds on a local powertrail the London Loop, though having used more than 1 car with leapfrogging (as far as my knowledge), didn't qualify for the cache's arbitrary challenge, though they kept their smileys since geocaching.com stats confirms the count for the day.

 

Debating what constitutes a legitimate find count for one day will go nowhere since people have different standards for their finds. IMO, the only way to 'compete' for finds in a day is simply to compare yourself with others who employed the same strategy.

 

Great for those people who leapfrog to a record with 5 vehicles - if those finds are legitimate in their eyes, great; it's still quite a feat, and that may hold a record, until another group does the same. But if one person finds 200 just themselves in one day, which count is "better", more impressive? Both are just as impressive, I think, just composed of different standards and different self-enforced rules.

 

Personally, I still haven't crossed 100 yet :P Hopefully soon.

 

I think anyone can be proud of whatever one-day find count they accumulate, if it beats their own previous record. That, itself, is a worthy goal, and really the only way to keep the single-day-finds number run fun (unless you really want to compete with other people).

 

tl;dr:

Record-holder lists don't mean much, imo, unless the counts are qualified with the strategies employed; and if each strategy is different, then really it's a bunch of individual 'records' under different categories. Tho all potentially impressive :)

Edited by thebruce0

Share this post


Link to post

Interestingly, the top scorers so far abiding by the cache ruleset (1 car, but leapfrogging allowed) didn't leap-frog, but used a strategy where the vehicle visited each cache (w/in 1-50ft) and each individual had a role to play in the team effort. That's a respectable accumulation, IMO, and accomplished via the ET powertrail.

Another strategy rewarded a very large group over 400 finds on a local powertrail the London Loop, though having used more than 1 car with leapfrogging (as far as my knowledge), didn't qualify for the cache's arbitrary challenge, though they kept their smileys since geocaching.com stats confirms the count for the day.

 

Were you part of the 400+ finds team on the London Loop that set and still currently holds the Ontario record which is 451 caches set by 4 members of the team? 5 vehicles were used and the rules were made very clear at the start. We all go to every cache. Once the cache is found/DNFed then we go to the next and so on. It's interesting that people who were not present and didn't take part in the fun day will continually try to diminish other's accomplishments by saying such things like they leapfrogged yet they have no proof of this, because I know it didn't happen or they create challenges by making arbitrary rules so that the true record holders won't be recognized.

 

The current recognized record to my knowledge is 1564. What method they chose to accomplish this feat, does not matter. Everyone plays the game different and geocaching leaves the door open for a variety of styles of game play. I still remember the day when people were trying to break the 100 find barrier and the various strategies that were discussed on how it could be done. There will always be others jealous of those that do the great accomplishments and set the records.

 

Congrats to RockHarder, Keith Watson, YoungKingKole, Team Goju for their Ontario record of 451 finds set on April 15, 2012

Congrats to Team Sand Dollar, Team Geo-Rangers, markj57, Peasinapod for their World record of 1564 finds set on September 4, 2011

 

And I look forward to reading about the adventures when these records are broken.

Share this post


Link to post

*sigh* This is what I was talking about.

 

1) Where at all was any accomplishment being diminished in my comment?

2) Quote: "leapfrogging (as far as my knowledge)" - if you didn't leapfrog, great. Your log implies that possibility: "...because [we] used more than 1 car for the group, then I will use July 3, 2012" and you willingly withdrew that day's count in recognition of the vehicle rule. Am I against leapfrogging? Is it bad? No. It's just a rule for my challenge cache. No one said leapfrogging was deplorable, and I don't know whether you did or not; all I know is you withdrew the claim on the grounds of more than 1 vehicle used.

3) My point was that each find count is potentially impressive, and in the context of competition should be qualified with the strategy employed*. Otherwise who's to say that 1000 finds among 20 people in 5 vehicles leapfrogging (this was not a direct reference to your group) accomplished something more or less worthy of "record holding" than a single person finding 200 alone? Two very different strategies, two very different categories.

4) Simply maintaining a list of high counts in a single leaderboard, "IMO", isn't really indicative of actual records as in relation to each other.

 

* This is why I encourage challenge completers to explain their strategy. It allows people who might take on the challenge to be encouraged, either to try the same strategy and have a target count to shoot for, or just not be discouraged simply by high numbers from other people. Keeps the challenge interesting and fun. (and also why 100 is the minimum count to log the cache as a find, so it's not a competition from a geocaching standpoint, and is pretty easily achievable for anyone who puts their mind to it for a day, and keeping hopefully in the "fun" zone)

 

Once again:

IMO, the only way to 'compete' for finds in a day is simply to compare yourself with others who employed the same strategy.

 

I think anyone can be proud of whatever one-day find count they accumulate, if it beats their own previous record. That, itself, is a worthy goal, and really the only way to keep the single-day-finds number run fun

 

I'm not interested in simply the biggest number claimed; A single person finding 200 is more impressive to me than four finding 500. But that's me. Both may be records in their own rights. Neither should feel "diminished" because someone else gets attention. Records have parameters. A list of high numbers means nothing to me. Explain the strategy, then we'll see how impressive a number is (and whether it beats a previous record achieved with the same strategy :))

 

For example... Going for a numbers run? Great. If you care, see what the current (known) record is for the strategy you're using - that is, don't think that the general current record to beat is 1564 or 451 (both achieved by groups), if your plan is to go out just yourself for as many as possible. That's a different category, a different record to shoot for.

 

All I'm saying is qualify the number with a strategy. There are many "Ontario records", and "world records" (single? group? vehicle? on foot? with a handicap? heck even day of the week could be a factor). Why stress about who holds whatever overall record? No reason to get angsty, and no one's accomplishment is being diminished. =P

 

This thread has a whole lot of impressive find counts, and hopefully people had a lot of fun and memorable moments doing them!

Share this post


Link to post

Who has the lowest number as their maximum in one day. I submit mine of 17. (That is in a 24h period, not a callender day)

 

there were three days where i found just 1. if i am reading the stats right.

Share this post


Link to post

 

Congrats to Team Sand Dollar, Team Geo-Rangers, markj57, Peasinapod for their World record of 1564 finds set on September 4, 2011[/b]

 

And I look forward to reading about the adventures when these records are broken.

 

Just looked at the Guinness World Records website and it still doesn't show a record for most caches done in a day so I don't think that is a recognized stat. GC.com doesn't even acknowledge the record so it is hard to say that it is a world record.

Share this post


Link to post

I'm very happy about finding 86 in one day.

It didn't even take all day. We had a hard time quitting after that but we were pretty tired.

We started before noon, and were done in time to go get some dinner.

It was a power trail, but one in the woods, which was a lot more fun. The people used very inventive cache names and some really amazing cache containers. Some were absolutely hysterical. (One was a cow mooning)

 

A lot of the caches on that power trail had favorite points, and to me that says a whole lot right there.

It was also unusual for a power trail because the reception was really bad. Our GPS's often were 100 feet off from each other. They bounced around really badly and had us looking all over. Not exactly like a desert trail.

 

We continued to find a few after the trail, on our way to dinner. It was funny because one would think we'd had enough for one day, but it was really hard to stop.

 

No leap-frogging, or other tricks. We did use the 3 minute rule. If you don't find it in three minutes, go on to the next. That's about it.

Share this post


Link to post

 

Debating what constitutes a legitimate find count for one day will go nowhere since people have different standards for their finds. IMO, the only way to 'compete' for finds in a day is simply to compare yourself with others who employed the same strategy.

 

Employing the same strategy is only one factor. I would think that the general location where one caches, and the relative cache density would have a far greater impact. If someone living in the state of NY want to get 400-500 caches (or more, in a day) it's very unlikely that they're going to do it here without a large team leapfrogging caches. There are essentially no power trains in the entire state. The closest that I can find is one in Westchester county that has less than 150 caches and each cache pages stats, "If you are looking for a quick P&G numbers crunch like other mega-series runs, this isn't it."

 

There are a *lot* of countries that don't have 150 caches in the entire country. Someone living in any of those countries trying to see how many caches they can find in a day is likely going to have a hard time breaking a dozen, no matter what strategy them employ (outside of armchair logging).

Share this post


Link to post

 

Debating what constitutes a legitimate find count for one day will go nowhere since people have different standards for their finds. IMO, the only way to 'compete' for finds in a day is simply to compare yourself with others who employed the same strategy.

 

Employing the same strategy is only one factor. I would think that the general location where one caches, and the relative cache density would have a far greater impact. If someone living in the state of NY want to get 400-500 caches (or more, in a day) it's very unlikely that they're going to do it here without a large team leapfrogging caches. There are essentially no power trains in the entire state. The closest that I can find is one in Westchester county that has less than 150 caches and each cache pages stats, "If you are looking for a quick P&G numbers crunch like other mega-series runs, this isn't it."

 

There are a *lot* of countries that don't have 150 caches in the entire country. Someone living in any of those countries trying to see how many caches they can find in a day is likely going to have a hard time breaking a dozen, no matter what strategy them employ (outside of armchair logging).

 

Huh?

How does cache density relate to if one has legitimately found a cache? If we are competing and using the exact same criteria to determine what is a found cache, density may have a factor on who wins, but it has nothing to do with us accurately comparing our progress.

Share this post


Link to post

 

Debating what constitutes a legitimate find count for one day will go nowhere since people have different standards for their finds. IMO, the only way to 'compete' for finds in a day is simply to compare yourself with others who employed the same strategy.

 

Employing the same strategy is only one factor. I would think that the general location where one caches, and the relative cache density would have a far greater impact. If someone living in the state of NY want to get 400-500 caches (or more, in a day) it's very unlikely that they're going to do it here without a large team leapfrogging caches. There are essentially no power trains in the entire state. The closest that I can find is one in Westchester county that has less than 150 caches and each cache pages stats, "If you are looking for a quick P&G numbers crunch like other mega-series runs, this isn't it."

 

There are a *lot* of countries that don't have 150 caches in the entire country. Someone living in any of those countries trying to see how many caches they can find in a day is likely going to have a hard time breaking a dozen, no matter what strategy them employ (outside of armchair logging).

 

Huh?

How does cache density relate to if one has legitimately found a cache? If we are competing and using the exact same criteria to determine what is a found cache, density may have a factor on who wins, but it has nothing to do with us accurately comparing our progress.

Cache density doesn't determine if the find is legitimate. It would however be a factor if you were trying to see who holds the "World Record" for caches in day. The playing field would have to be level is what I think NYPaddleCacher was saying.

 

From my home coords you would have to scour an area of over 11,000 square miles to find 1,000 caches, and a good number of those are 4+ terrain caches.

In some parts of LA it would take an area of less than 200 square miles to do the same.

Share this post


Link to post

 

Debating what constitutes a legitimate find count for one day will go nowhere since people have different standards for their finds. IMO, the only way to 'compete' for finds in a day is simply to compare yourself with others who employed the same strategy.

 

Employing the same strategy is only one factor. I would think that the general location where one caches, and the relative cache density would have a far greater impact. If someone living in the state of NY want to get 400-500 caches (or more, in a day) it's very unlikely that they're going to do it here without a large team leapfrogging caches. There are essentially no power trains in the entire state. The closest that I can find is one in Westchester county that has less than 150 caches and each cache pages stats, "If you are looking for a quick P&G numbers crunch like other mega-series runs, this isn't it."

 

There are a *lot* of countries that don't have 150 caches in the entire country. Someone living in any of those countries trying to see how many caches they can find in a day is likely going to have a hard time breaking a dozen, no matter what strategy them employ (outside of armchair logging).

 

Huh?

How does cache density relate to if one has legitimately found a cache? If we are competing and using the exact same criteria to determine what is a found cache, density may have a factor on who wins, but it has nothing to do with us accurately comparing our progress.

Cache density doesn't determine if the find is legitimate. It would however be a factor if you were trying to see who holds the "World Record" for caches in day. The playing field would have to be level is what I think NYPaddleCacher was saying.

 

 

Yep. That is what I was saying. Cache "orientation" (where one cache is located with respect to the next two closest) might have an impact as well. When the caches are linear, as in a power trail, it's more conducive to leap frogging, and if one lives in an area whee there are no power trails, that *could* influence the legitimacy of the find.

 

 

From my home coords you would have to scour an area of over 11,000 square miles to find 1,000 caches, and a good number of those are 4+ terrain caches.

In some parts of LA it would take an area of less than 200 square miles to do the same.

 

Algeria: 2,381,741 sq km, 9 geocaches.

Share this post


Link to post

 

Debating what constitutes a legitimate find count for one day will go nowhere since people have different standards for their finds. IMO, the only way to 'compete' for finds in a day is simply to compare yourself with others who employed the same strategy.

 

Employing the same strategy is only one factor. I would think that the general location where one caches, and the relative cache density would have a far greater impact. If someone living in the state of NY want to get 400-500 caches (or more, in a day) it's very unlikely that they're going to do it here without a large team leapfrogging caches. There are essentially no power trains in the entire state. The closest that I can find is one in Westchester county that has less than 150 caches and each cache pages stats, "If you are looking for a quick P&G numbers crunch like other mega-series runs, this isn't it."

 

There are a *lot* of countries that don't have 150 caches in the entire country. Someone living in any of those countries trying to see how many caches they can find in a day is likely going to have a hard time breaking a dozen, no matter what strategy them employ (outside of armchair logging).

 

Huh?

How does cache density relate to if one has legitimately found a cache? If we are competing and using the exact same criteria to determine what is a found cache, density may have a factor on who wins, but it has nothing to do with us accurately comparing our progress.

Cache density doesn't determine if the find is legitimate. It would however be a factor if you were trying to see who holds the "World Record" for caches in day. The playing field would have to be level is what I think NYPaddleCacher was saying.

 

From my home coords you would have to scour an area of over 11,000 square miles to find 1,000 caches, and a good number of those are 4+ terrain caches.

In some parts of LA it would take an area of less than 200 square miles to do the same.

 

Well, in my area, I'm not going to be setting any cross country skiing records. I would probably have better odds if I went to where the snow it.

 

The only way to level the playing field is to have the participants find the exact same caches, in the exact same manner.

Edited by Don_J

Share this post


Link to post

The reason I asked the original question is that I think in Ontario Canada, the cache count in a single day is below 200 caches (may be more now).

We don't have long desert roads like route 66 where caches can be jump, stamp, jump in.

 

Here's the history of the world record. When was 1568 set and by who so it can be added to the following.

 

1564 (1 Day 12:00AM - 9:17PM) - September 4, 2011 - Team Sand Dollar, Team Geo-Rangers, markj57, Peasinapod

1157 (24 hrs) - Monday, September 27, 2010 - Alamo, Nevada - Foomanjoo, F0T0M0M, ventura_kids

1105 - (1 Day 8:20AM - 6:45PM) - July 31, 2010 - Nevada - FlagMan, devhead, AS73, SD-Weiss, Thunder-4, Ragfoot

1021 - (1 Day) - July 14, 2010 - Nevada - Triple Crown, Duncan!, lulu499, snflwrmh

737 - (1 Day) - July 7, 2010 - Nevada - tite lines

1038 - (24 hrs) - June 18\19, 2010 - Nevada - Peasinapod, Team Geo-Rangers

695 (1 Day) - Friday, April 16, 2010 - Nevada\California - legoboyjj, Rain or Shine, ZSteve

626 (1 Day) - Friday, April 2, 2010 - Nevada\Califonria - Team Geo-Rangers, Peasinapod

 

Last week I met peasinapod (well, 1/2 of them as they are a couple) and markj57 at the Lunchtime in Ravenland Event (Prescott, AZ). I spoke with them and asked about how they did 1564 in a day. He said it was on the ET Highway, that they worked in teams, packed everything like food/water, and even pre-placed gasoline containers along the route. He also said if they had more caches to find that day they would have kept going, but ran out of caches (I guess ET didn't have 2000 at that time). He likened it to running a marathon, very grueling and at times boring.

 

Peasinapod has also placed a 300-cache powertrail in Arizona called the F2K Series (which we did half of in about 6 hours about 2 months ago). Looking at their profile and statistics are interesting and they have been doing it a long time.

 

Having met them, I have no reason to doubt they would make this stuff up, IMO. They would only be fooling themselves otherwise. And I was invited to join them sometime (in Phoenix) if I wanted to see how they operate.

 

Having said that, (and I would appreciate no argumentative feedback because I really don't care if you believe them or not)154 was my best in a day. I wanted at least 100 to be eligible to complete the 100 Cache Challenge (GC2E64J)when I found this cache on a trip to CA.

 

I will never be a 'record-setter' here at geocaching nor do I strive to be. I set personal goals and go for them as long as they remain fun. I could have completed the other part of Peasinapods' 300 cache series but the group (and I) decided it wasn't as much fun anymore. That's what caching is all about - having fun and not being a competition. Kudos to those that set standards and achieve them, regardless of how high they are. I just don't ever wanna lose sight of the goal of having fun.

Share this post


Link to post

what is the difference ??

1 day ?

24 hrs ?

well it must be SAME DATE if you ask me..

SAME date is 24hrs, you start at 00:00:00 and end at 23:59:59

 

if some people start at noon and work 24hrs from there,

they find halve of the caches one date and the other halve the next date

so HALVE score dudes !!

Share this post


Link to post

I think they mean Day as opposed to Night. So 24 hrs would be all day and night and Day would mean if you can see without a flashlight.

Share this post


Link to post

I'm just wondering if anyone knows what the most number of caches found in 1 day is by a single cacher or team.

 

I found 7,333 in one day once....

Share this post


Link to post

How about the least amount of caches in one day? Lately, I've been averaging one a week. That's about .14 a day...sheesh! :(

 

I went 300 plus days between finds once....

Share this post


Link to post

I think they mean Day as opposed to Night. So 24 hrs would be all day and night and Day would mean if you can see without a flashlight.

 

--Day would be 1 calendar day from midnight to midnight.

--24 hrs would be any 24 hr period, ie from 8am to 8am the next day, hence those finds over the 24 hrs would be split into 2 different days...a new day starts at midnight.

Share this post


Link to post

I think they mean Day as opposed to Night. So 24 hrs would be all day and night and Day would mean if you can see without a flashlight.

 

--Day would be 1 calendar day from midnight to midnight.

--24 hrs would be any 24 hr period, ie from 8am to 8am the next day, hence those finds over the 24 hrs would be split into 2 different days...a new day starts at midnight.

 

so 12:01 am to 12:01 am is not day, but 24hrs. phew thanks for clearing that up... 8-)

Edited by Frank Broughton

Share this post


Link to post

I think they mean Day as opposed to Night. So 24 hrs would be all day and night and Day would mean if you can see without a flashlight.

 

--Day would be 1 calendar day from midnight to midnight.

--24 hrs would be any 24 hr period, ie from 8am to 8am the next day, hence those finds over the 24 hrs would be split into 2 different days...a new day starts at midnight.

 

so 12:01 am to 12:01 am is not day, but 24hrs. phew thanks for clearing that up... 8-)

I think the answer is clear. 12:01 is 2 minutes into the next day.

Share this post


Link to post

I'm just wondering if anyone knows what the most number of caches found in 1 day is by a single cacher or team.

 

You can find some fairly good numbers and statistics here: Top caches in one day

Share this post


Link to post

I'm just wondering if anyone knows what the most number of caches found in 1 day is by a single cacher or team.

 

You can find some fairly good numbers and statistics here: Top caches in one day

 

Ooh, interesting site. Pulled, I presume, from whatever stats the system is able to retrieve from publicly accessible data?

Though again, (presumably) its only parameters are raw profile statistics; no strategies, no info about number of people or teamwork, etc. ie Do with the stats as you wish. Neat link, thanks

Share this post


Link to post

Stats and manure have a lot in common. Once they're processed that are beneficial and promote growth; however in their raw state they are both stinking piles of #$%* and nobody wants to deal with yours.

  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post

Asking who has the most finds in a day is almost as bad as asking who has the most FTFs

  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post

I think they mean Day as opposed to Night. So 24 hrs would be all day and night and Day would mean if you can see without a flashlight.

 

--Day would be 1 calendar day from midnight to midnight.

--24 hrs would be any 24 hr period, ie from 8am to 8am the next day, hence those finds over the 24 hrs would be split into 2 different days...a new day starts at midnight.

 

so 12:01 am to 12:01 am is not day, but 24hrs. phew thanks for clearing that up... 8-)

I think the answer is clear. 12:01 is 2 minutes into the next day.

It's math like this that makes for interesting stats. 1 minute = 2 minutes???

Share this post


Link to post

I'm just wondering if anyone knows what the most number of caches found in 1 day is by a single cacher or team.

 

You can find some fairly good numbers and statistics here: Top caches in one day

 

Interesting site. Thanks for the link.

Share this post


Link to post

I think they mean Day as opposed to Night. So 24 hrs would be all day and night and Day would mean if you can see without a flashlight.

 

--Day would be 1 calendar day from midnight to midnight.

--24 hrs would be any 24 hr period, ie from 8am to 8am the next day, hence those finds over the 24 hrs would be split into 2 different days...a new day starts at midnight.

 

so 12:01 am to 12:01 am is not day, but 24hrs. phew thanks for clearing that up... 8-)

I think the answer is clear. 12:01 is 2 minutes into the next day.

It's math like this that makes for interesting stats. 1 minute = 2 minutes???

 

If it's the middle of the night, then 11:59 would still be in the pm. 12:00 would be in the am and the start of a new day. The end of 12:01 (right before the minute changed to 02) would be right at 2 minutes into the new day.

Share this post


Link to post

Who has the lowest number as their maximum in one day. I submit mine of 17. (That is in a 24h period, not a callender day)

 

there were three days where i found just 1. if i am reading the stats right.

 

According to your statistics:

 

Best Day :

40 caches in one day on 01/23/2009

 

 

Share this post


Link to post

arcording to the stat program as listed

a day = same date,

this is offcourse also the most fun challenge,

people going out on a 24hr endurance run, from midday to midday

find them self way down the stats,

since they logged and also found caches over 2 dates..

there is no 24hr periode stat and no way to measure it using the sites..

so my point is : change the way you measure to a way the system works.. by DATES..

Share this post


Link to post
Oh FTF's I have 32,2232 of them.

Oh, I think you're lying... You know how I know? Cuz that's not even a number! psshhhhh

  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post

arcording to the stat program as listed

a day = same date,

this is offcourse also the most fun challenge,

people going out on a 24hr endurance run, from midday to midday

find them self way down the stats,

since they logged and also found caches over 2 dates..

there is no 24hr periode stat and no way to measure it using the sites..

so my point is : change the way you measure to a way the system works.. by DATES..

 

This is so silly. If I started a construction project that took 12 hours to complete, and I started at 8PM and finished the next morning at 8AM, would you say that it took me two days to complete the project?

 

A day is a 24.+ hour period. It is the time that it takes the Earth to rotate on it axis, one time back to the starting point. That starting point can be any point in time.

 

Found logs do not have time stamps in them, only dates. It is common to simply look at a stats program and say, "he did that may in a day", while the reality is that he did that may on a calendar date.

Share this post


Link to post

arcording to the stat program as listed

a day = same date,

this is offcourse also the most fun challenge,

people going out on a 24hr endurance run, from midday to midday

find them self way down the stats,

since they logged and also found caches over 2 dates..

there is no 24hr periode stat and no way to measure it using the sites..

so my point is : change the way you measure to a way the system works.. by DATES..

That is a shortcoming of the system. It is rather pedantic to require a "most in 1 day" stat to start and end at midnight. Then there is the issue of midnight solar time, standard time, daylight savings time, what if a few of the caches are accross a time zone change. The only sain way to measure is any consecutive 24h period.

 

My best day was 17 caches, but only 13 were found on day 1(after 2200h), and 4 were found after midnight on day 2 (before 0100h). While only 13 were found on a calander day, clearly 17 were found within a consecutive 24h perios (well 3h actually).

Edit for spelling

Edited by Andronicus

Share this post


Link to post
Oh FTF's I have 32,2232 of them.

Oh, I think you're lying... You know how I know? Cuz that's not even a number! psshhhhh

Awe man, you busted me.... and I thought i was going to be given all kinds of glory and told how great I am.... now it looks like I failed 3rd grade math. :P

Edited by Frank Broughton
  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post

Most finds in one day: 131 caches in one day on 11/22/2012

 

However my best day geocaching was when I had about 36 finds up near Suisun City, running around back roads and even solved a puzzle by lamp light in the dark of night. That was a fun, fun day.

Share this post


Link to post
On 12/8/2012 at 11:32 PM, Ahern Clan said:

 

Last week I met peasinapod (well, 1/2 of them as they are a couple) and markj57 at the Lunchtime in Ravenland Event (Prescott, AZ). I spoke with them and asked about how they did 1564 in a day. He said it was on the ET Highway, that they worked in teams, packed everything like food/water, and even pre-placed gasoline containers along the route. He also said if they had more caches to find that day they would have kept going, but ran out of caches (I guess ET didn't have 2000 at that time). He likened it to running a marathon, very grueling and at times boring.

 

Peasinapod has also placed a 300-cache powertrail in Arizona called the F2K Series (which we did half of in about 6 hours about 2 months ago). Looking at their profile and statistics are interesting and they have been doing it a long time.

 

Having met them, I have no reason to doubt they would make this stuff up, IMO. They would only be fooling themselves otherwise. And I was invited to join them sometime (in Phoenix) if I wanted to see how they operate.

 

Having said that, (and I would appreciate no argumentative feedback because I really don't care if you believe them or not)154 was my best in a day. I wanted at least 100 to be eligible to complete the 100 Cache Challenge (GC2E64J)when I found this cache on a trip to CA.

 

I will never be a 'record-setter' here at geocaching nor do I strive to be. I set personal goals and go for them as long as they remain fun. I could have completed the other part of Peasinapods' 300 cache series but the group (and I) decided it wasn't as much fun anymore. That's what caching is all about - having fun and not being a competition. Kudos to those that set standards and achieve them, regardless of how high they are. I just don't ever wanna lose sight of the goal of having fun.

 

A little clarification: On the 1564 run, Team 1K+ started at midnight with the first of the ET series and finished #1500 at 9:17 PM.  It was four geocachers in one vehicle (Owned by Peasinapod).  There were other nearby caches not part of the series found along the way too.  We went to Tonopah to find more.  We stopped around 11:30 PM at 1564 and got rooms to shower/sleep, instead of returning to Rachel:  https://coord.info/TB3NYW5    Like others noted in the thread, we ran out of ET caches to find and had time to find more, if that series had been longer?  That afternoon, I recall we checked our hourly find rate.  It averaged around 96 finds/hour.  That rate went down with darkness.  We divided up the duties designating one driver, one person to log caches sitting in the back of the truckbed in a folding chair, and two runners/seekers that sat on the back of the truck with a modified platform installed in the tow hitch.  We would switch roles when anyone grew tired.  Driving from California to meet the others from Arizona,  I positioned two large full gas cans in the desert at strategic spots to refuel so we could keep geocaching and not have to divert for gas, as was the case when Peasinapod & I found 626 in the CA desert, doing the now archived trail of the gods/presidents/etc.  Peasinapod was very prepared with lots of cold drinks and snacks to keep us going.  We all worked together and encouraged each other to keep going.  And we didn't suffer a flat tire or close encounter either!  It was definitely an adventure and clearly not for everyone that enjoys geocaching. And that's fine since it's all good, when geocaching. :)  

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post

I would have lasted a half hour doing that! Once you start rotating containers like that, IMO you aren't geocaching any more....

  • Upvote 5
  • Funny 1
  • Love 2

Share this post


Link to post
10 hours ago, lee737 said:

I would have lasted a half hour doing that! Once you start rotating containers like that, IMO you aren't geocaching any more....

 

Round we go :)

IMO, you're still geocaching if you're finding containers and signing every logsheet. But everyone's got opinions on the matter. For the ET, it's known by HQ and allowed in series (and not something I would do elsewhere), so do as you wish, and have fun. (review most any thread about power trails for the endless debate about ET highway practices :ph34r:)

  • Funny 2

Share this post


Link to post
8 hours ago, thebruce0 said:

IMO, you're still geocaching if you're finding containers and signing every logsheet.

FWIW, the Geocaching 101 page includes "return the geocache to its original location" in the same sentence as "Sign the logbook" under the "How is the game played?" explanation.

 

I'm with lee737 on this. With any other caches, moving the containers is vandalism. It isn't vandalism on numbers trails where the owners allow/encourage the three cache monte, but that doesn't mean it's geocaching.

  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)
On 12/31/2020 at 6:26 PM, niraD said:
On 12/31/2020 at 10:13 AM, thebruce0 said:

IMO, you're still geocaching if you're finding containers and signing every logsheet.

FWIW, the Geocaching 101 page includes "return the geocache to its original location" in the same sentence as "Sign the logbook" under the "How is the game played?" explanation.

 

Yes, that's why the ET is an exception.

Also, I said "IMO" - in this case the commonality in all these experiences - finding the containers and signing every logsheet.  Since there's an exception, I still feel I'm geocaching if on the ET highway (nowhere else, so far) I have located a container, signed the logsheet, and ensured the cache just found is still findable in the exact same manner for the next person.  The only difference between the ET and everywhere else is whether the container is the same one or another identical one. For the ET - this is not defense of throwdowns in general.

 

On 12/31/2020 at 6:26 PM, niraD said:

I'm with lee737 on this. With any other caches, moving the containers is vandalism. It isn't vandalism on numbers trails where the owners allow/encourage the three cache monte, but that doesn't mean it's geocaching.

 

"That's not real geocaching" is quite the no true scotsman argument, and can apply to any number of geocaching activities and strategies. And has been argued before, from purists to newbies. 

IYO (is that an IMO opposite thing? It's Your Opinion? heh) so that's great. Ultimately, if you don't think it's geocaching, then you still have the choice to do the ET how you wish. It is still geocaching in the sense that the CO and HQ allow the practice in this case. So I am (and many many others are) happy to enjoy it one of the ways that's allowable and condoned. It's still geocaching to me (because find, sign, log online).  But nowhere else.

Edited by thebruce0

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 8

×
×
  • Create New...