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Mike & Jess

Backpacking cooking stoves

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I'm looking for suggestions, opinions, and preferences on light weight backpacking stoves and fuel types. I'm currently using a Bunsen burner type stove which works, but leaves me guessing at how much fuel is left, so I'm always carrying a spare burner. Most cases I'm cool to fair weather camping (30'F + temps).

 

From what I see, selecting a few type will be the first thing, then a specific stove. For backpacking, I'm seeing my options as;

- alcohol

- solid fuel tabs

- wicked Bunsen burner

- kindling

 

I kind of like the idea of the kindling stoves as you'll never run out of fuel. The kicker is, the price difference between a kindling stove and any other would more then cover the cost of fuel.

The wicked Bunsen burner stoves are a pain as you never know if you'll have enough fuel for the weekend if carrying a slightly used canister. The fuel cans also tend to be more $$ then alcohol or solid fuel.

Altitude will not be an issue, so I can use alcohol with no issue.

 

Any recommendations or suggestions on which fuel type to consider, and then what to look for in a stove for that type of fuel?

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I am a fan of kindling and fuel tablet stoves. I make my own kindling stove using a medium tomato can and 3 nails for the pot holder. I also like the Esbit stove and tablets. I don't like carrying liquid fuel, that's just me. These options have worked great for 2-4 day trips.

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I am a fan of kindling and fuel tablet stoves. I make my own kindling stove using a medium tomato can and 3 nails for the pot holder. I also like the Esbit stove and tablets. I don't like carrying liquid fuel, that's just me. These options have worked great for 2-4 day trips.

I like the DIY kits, but if I'm going to upgrade my current setup, it'll need to be foldable. Most kindling stoves are ~$60-$80 from what I have seen for pre-made. Might consider making my own as it would cost me less for sheet metal and rivots.

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I am a fan of kindling and fuel tablet stoves. I make my own kindling stove using a medium tomato can and 3 nails for the pot holder. I also like the Esbit stove and tablets. I don't like carrying liquid fuel, that's just me. These options have worked great for 2-4 day trips.

I like the DIY kits, but if I'm going to upgrade my current setup, it'll need to be foldable. Most kindling stoves are ~$60-$80 from what I have seen for pre-made. Might consider making my own as it would cost me less for sheet metal and rivots.

 

DIY is great, that's how the commercial ones got to be what they are. Fine tuning for best efficiency takes time though. You Pay to let someone else who did the time and research recoup a bit.

 

I bumped up some of the stove threads for you and others interested!

 

I was wondering when you say 'wicked Bunsen Burner' are you refering to things like the Optimus 8r, Svea 123 and so on stoves that draw up fuel into the head to evapourate and then burn as gas... that's the only thing that I can picture since Bunsen burners are needle and orfice type gas burners. If that is the right class, I can say that I've used an 8r, 123 and an Optimus 111 for years.

Aside from the silly eco tax charge on white gas they are great if a bit heavy.

Don't know what they were thinking with the eco fee, since I've never seen anyone not use their gas up, or if they didn't, they passed it on to people heading IN to use up. Containers simply could have had a small deposit like beer and pop cans if they were the problem. I'm surprised Coleman and others didn't get that blocked. As for eco, I'm sure that the people who turned to open fires for heat, light and cooking uses create much less pollution, and NO stray fires burning up the country side. I always see snaplights and their wrappers left behind in campsites and parking areas, don't mention 'nappies'.

Also not much in favour of those who want their dogs to run free with nature off leash... often that translates to POing the local bears, who chase them back to the owner and anyone else in the area of the owner. I'll take a little left over gas and some litter. Can you tell I don't have a multi fuel device?

 

Doug 7rxc

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Here is the current stove I have (sorry, not a coleman like I thought).

http://forum.northernontariogeocachers.com/download/file.php?id=383&mode=view

http://forum.northernontariogeocachers.com/download/file.php?id=384&mode=view

 

As previously mentioned, it works, but can be a pain for managing fuel as you can never tell if you have enough fuel for the trip.

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Here is the current stove I have (sorry, not a coleman like I thought).

http://forum.northernontariogeocachers.com/download/file.php?id=383&mode=view

http://forum.northernontariogeocachers.com/download/file.php?id=384&mode=view

 

As previously mentioned, it works, but can be a pain for managing fuel as you can never tell if you have enough fuel for the trip.

The frame looks like it would take Sterno cans as well. The 'burner' looks like it is just an alcohol 'lamp' like the ones out of a chemistry set, except made of tin. Would a simple refillable 'lamp' work fit in the frame?

There are those 'beer can stoves' that might fit as well (alcohol burners).

 

When we used to go out we just used the 8r stoves at first, fuel (wg) was heavy, but we balanced the menu so that the heavy food and the fuel got used up first. Later items just needed warming up. That helped a lot. The 8r's flat box was stable and with 3 or more you could support a big pot and heat quickly if needed. I had several of them, most were 'donated' by people who didn't understand the pre heating process and got tired or scared of the fireballs they sometimes created when doing it poorly. Not good to light near tents etc. Having wg at hand makes lighting a bonfire a cinch though re other thread. I've even stuffed the whole stove under to warm up kindling (while lit of course) but don't ever leave it in there or else. Problem as I said is that eco fee on fuel.

Locally a 1 litre can is amost 7 bucks most of which is eco fee. Best is to buy a big can and share it around (same fee regardless). You have to be rich to use wg much these days.

 

Doug 7rxc

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Here is the current stove I have (sorry, not a coleman like I thought).

http://forum.northernontariogeocachers.com/download/file.php?id=383&mode=view

http://forum.northernontariogeocachers.com/download/file.php?id=384&mode=view

 

As previously mentioned, it works, but can be a pain for managing fuel as you can never tell if you have enough fuel for the trip.

The frame looks like it would take Sterno cans as well. The 'burner' looks like it is just an alcohol 'lamp' like the ones out of a chemistry set, except made of tin. Would a simple refillable 'lamp' work fit in the frame?

There are those 'beer can stoves' that might fit as well (alcohol burners).

 

When we used to go out we just used the 8r stoves at first, fuel (wg) was heavy, but we balanced the menu so that the heavy food and the fuel got used up first. Later items just needed warming up. That helped a lot. The 8r's flat box was stable and with 3 or more you could support a big pot and heat quickly if needed. I had several of them, most were 'donated' by people who didn't understand the pre heating process and got tired or scared of the fireballs they sometimes created when doing it poorly. Not good to light near tents etc. Having wg at hand makes lighting a bonfire a cinch though re other thread. I've even stuffed the whole stove under to warm up kindling (while lit of course) but don't ever leave it in there or else. Problem as I said is that eco fee on fuel.

Locally a 1 litre can is amost 7 bucks most of which is eco fee. Best is to buy a big can and share it around (same fee regardless). You have to be rich to use wg much these days.

 

Doug 7rxc

The can looks to be crimped shut, so I would have to fab a plug of some sort and punch a hole in the side for filling.

As for the stove itself, I would imaging I could use a different fuel (alcohol or similar) in the place of the current can. Maybe I'll consider looking at alternative fuel sources instead of replacing the whole thing.

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Don't know if you have seen these. But for all who might be interested.

 

Coghlan's Camp Heat Features:

Odorless, Non-toxic fumes, Approximately 4 hours burn time per can.

 

Specs:

Contains: 2 - 6.4 oz (128 g) cans diethylene glycol.

Product may freeze when temperature reaches 16 degrees Farenheit (-8 Celsuis)

 

MSDS:

Material Safety Data Sheet

 

From what I see, for the price it would just be just as easy to buy new ones as opposed to refilling, alternates would be the better choice, beyond having a few 'originals'. A lot depends on what you are doing with it. Keeping a burn time record might help, just mark it on the cool side of the can.

 

Either way you are carrying fuel. This fuel also has a history re poisoning in an unsealed form (bulk or leaked).

 

Doug 7rxc

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Wife and I have been experimenting with different backpacking stoves since we've recently got back into hiking. Originally bought one of the tiny propane jobs. Jet Boil I think is the name. It works great, but, like mentioned above, you can't tell how much fuel is left on a trip.

 

We've been experimenting with homemade pop can stoves. The few prototypes we've made have been rather impressive. One I made last week throws a hot, blue flame for 15 minutes with 2 ounces (yellow bottle) HEET alcohol. More than enough time to boil two cups of water for a dehydrated meal pack or ramins. Fuel, stove and thrift store cook pots have cost less than five bucks, total. :)

 

I guess with either of these systems you could augment cooking with small wood fuelled cook fires, hobo fashion.

 

One Youtube resource we've learned a lot from is a user named Shug Emery. Entertaining fellow too. :) Look up his cookware kit reviews.

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Ive used the cat food can stove. If you have a can of fancy feast and a hole punch you can make one. I went back to a canister stove, a snow peak gigapower. It's small reliable and not as quirky as the cat stove. It's hard to spill it and the wind doesn't bother it like the cat food or pop can stove. Plus, I finally figured out how to brown some rolls in the woods with it, and hot Crusty rolls make anything tolerable.

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I am a fan of kindling and fuel tablet stoves. I make my own kindling stove using a medium tomato can and 3 nails for the pot holder. I also like the Esbit stove and tablets. I don't like carrying liquid fuel, that's just me. These options have worked great for 2-4 day trips.

 

What do you mean by a "kindling stove"? Even Google failed me on that one.

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I am a fan of kindling and fuel tablet stoves. I make my own kindling stove using a medium tomato can and 3 nails for the pot holder. I also like the Esbit stove and tablets. I don't like carrying liquid fuel, that's just me. These options have worked great for 2-4 day trips.

 

What do you mean by a "kindling stove"? Even Google failed me on that one.

 

zzstoves: http://www.zzstove.com/

 

sierra_front.jpg

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Maybe it's just me, but I prefer to use a propane/butane canister stove when backpacking.

We'll play with pop cans and others while stationary camping (in a Park or camp grounds), but I want the reliability of a real stove to light and stay lit, functioning when needed when I'm in the middle of nowhere backpacking.

We're already eating when some folks would still be trying to get twigs lit.

Rain and wind can ruin your day if your stove won't light.

I've used mine often at five degrees with a hand warmer (that CJ already has in a pocket or gloves) placed under it. After minus ten or so, the igniter won't spark. Smoker, always have a lighter so it's no big deal.

 

CJ usually has an Esbit stove with a stack of tabs as a backup, but we haven't needed it - yet.

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Maybe it's just me, but I prefer to use a propane/butane canister stove when backpacking.

We'll play with pop cans and others while stationary camping (in a Park or camp grounds), but I want the reliability of a real stove to light and stay lit, functioning when needed when I'm in the middle of nowhere backpacking.

We're already eating when some folks would still be trying to get twigs lit.

Rain and wind can ruin your day if your stove won't light.

I've used mine often at five degrees with a hand warmer (that CJ already has in a pocket or gloves) placed under it. After minus ten or so, the igniter won't spark. Smoker, always have a lighter so it's no big deal.

 

CJ usually has an Esbit stove with a stack of tabs as a backup, but we haven't needed it - yet.

 

Ummm...I used my zzstove for five straight months, in rain, snow, sub zero temps and in summer's heat. It never failed me. I will admit to carrying the battery and dry tinder in an inner pocket to assure a quick start, but I recall seeing people searching for a store that sold cannisters that fit their toves and others being unable to refill tanks because no one had white gas in town.

 

We used to plastic bag the burner cup after it had cooled to keep the soot issue under control, but every stove has issues.

 

I think stove selection is nearly more art than science - no disputing taste.

 

Still, how much more reliable do you need?

Edited by ATMouse

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I always went with the MSR Whisperlite. Design hasn't changed since I bought mine 20 years ago.

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I'm with hzoi.

MSR whisperlite (international). Folds up tiny, you can burn pretty much any liquid gas and the white gas that is the best for it is super cheap. keep re-using the canister, you can just top it up before each trip so you know how much you have. I think the jet boil boils a little faster... but 3 mins is not a bad time for a boil. I have never had an issue with mine.

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Most common in Sweden are the Trangia 25 and 27 series, also still being manufactured in said country. Available with alcohol or propane burner; I prefer alcohol due to simplicity and good availability. Not the lightest kits at 650grams for a 2x1L stove - but I haven't found any other option to be more convenient or bombproof. The whole thing is wind resistant and everything packs down into a snug fitting package just slightly larger than the largest pot.

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Used a MSR Whisperlite International Stove (multi-fuel) for 19 backpacking/hiking/camping days in Iceland. Performed well in windy, rainy conditions. Very light, compact.

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If you go with a kindling stove, many areas will consider the stove to be an open fire and require a permit or outright prohibit the stove's use.

 

My preference is white gas in a stove that has a pump. I have used both MSR with removable bottles and Coleman with fixed bottles, both with pumps, and liked them both. The MSR was a bit lighter, but the Coleman made up for its weight via convenience and ease of use.

 

Coleman Backpack Stove, Fixed Bottle. Very nice, wide burner, even heat on pan bottom.

coleman-exponent.jpg

 

MSR Backpack Stove, Removable Bottle. Focused hot spot, good for boiling water fast, but creates a concentrated hot spot on pan, so pancakes are out!

msr_whisperLite%20international.jpg

 

Coleman now has a removable bottle stove too, but I have not tried it, but it looks pretty nice.

colemanapexii.jpg

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If you go with a kindling stove, many areas will consider the stove to be an open fire and require a permit or outright prohibit the stove's use.

 

My preference is white gas in a stove that has a pump. I have used both MSR with removable bottles and Coleman with fixed bottles, both with pumps, and liked them both. The MSR was a bit lighter, but the Coleman made up for its weight via convenience and ease of use.

 

snip%<

 

I've always had a liking for white gas stoves, mostly because that was the better option. Svea 123 and Optimus 8r are still in use and I'm working on an older Coleman Pk 1 I was given for fixing up another older Coleman for a friend.

 

Problem up here in BC is this dang ECO fee they levy on white gas. Locally a one litre can is almost 8 bucks.

Five of that is the ECO fee and it isn't a deposit on the can, but a penalty for using white gas.

 

You can minimize that by buying larger quantities of course, same fee for bigger amounts.

Some of the remaining cost is just being located at the end of the road and having one source of supply in a tourist area. I can see having a deposit to make sure cans come out of the bush (if you carry a fuel bottle it does anyhow) but I've never seen white gas dumped or not shared if it was extra to ones needs. I asked about the fee once and was told that too many people used it for paint thinner, so EVERYONE was being hit with the fee rather than just people who were trying to buy cheap thinner. As far as I can see the only thing it has done for us (campers of all types) is to render obsolete all the Coleman stoves, lanterns, heaters etc. that run so well on it and have been part of our outdoor history for so long. Additionally, there is a marked upturn in the number of screw on propane bottles, spent butane containers and even old campfires abandoned in the bush. NO deposit on those either, but the abandoned campfire (still hot) will net you a big fine if caught.

 

I see that some of these stoves are now available in forms that will use unleaded gas. Wonder if the old ones can be 'refueled'? Probably not very easily, although some devices it's just a matter of jet size. I don't like the idea of unleaded gas that much since it seems to be quite a hazard to carry.

 

I might look at that last one though. Like the wide base and even heat idea. You ever try some sort of flame diffuser on your MSR for pancakes? Something like the old stove top toasters for Coleman camp stoves. Just spreads the flame out evenly (a plate with holes in it). Ignore using the toast holders.

 

Doug 7rxc

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If you are still interested, I am an avid backpacker and often go on multiple day trips on the AT. Most of my hiking is done in the winter months but also spring and summer. I use a Trangia alcohol stove with a small, light winter add-on. The stove is very light and I always know how much fuel I have. I always carry a very small bottle of extra alcohol. Very versatile. Only downside is it takes a little longer for water to boil.

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Just my two cents.

 

I have two stoves, a MSR Whisperlite and a Jetboil. Both are great, the Jetboil can make hot water in about two minutes, great if you're doing dehydrated meals and hot drinks on an overnight or ultralight trip. The fuel comes in pressurized canisters which last forever.

 

The Whisperlite is more versatile, but you have to pack your pots and pans which adds a little weight. However, you can bake a cake with a Whisperlite which I haven't figured out how to do with a Jetboil yet. Fuel seems to weigh a bit more and doesn't last as long.

 

Just my personal observations, hope they help.

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MSR Backpack Stove, Removable Bottle. Focused hot spot, good for boiling water fast, but creates a concentrated hot spot on pan, so pancakes are out!

msr_whisperLite%20international.jpg

 

 

This is my favorite stove. There is a product called "Scorchbuster" that diffuses the flame. It is a small, light weight disc that goes between the burner and pot and I think essential for the Whisperlite and similar stoves.

Edited by briansnat

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Reply from a British geoacher: I use a single burner butane stove - easy fit Camping Gaz one, and mine has a really small cooking ring with folding arms. Not seen them for a few years as Camping Gaz seem to have changed their range.

I surround with an aluminium sheild and use a small cookpot for boiling water. All fits inside a small net carry bag complete with gas cannister. If theres a few of us, I take a small kettle that holds a good litre of water for brewing tea and coffee.

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The MSR Stoves are work horses in the climbing community. I always take 2 full bottles of White Gas. The diffuser works wonders as well as the Windshield.

 

REI may still have rental units to try out to see which stove you prefer.

 

I made a insulated sleeve for my bottles, when Snow & Ice happens. These sleeves work wonders high in the mountains, where terrain may not be level. No one wants their fuel to roll away.

 

Good luck on your quest to find which stove works best for you.

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I am first and foremost a hiker. Geocaching came long after I started climbing in the Alps, so I bought my stove looking for something light, reliable and versatile.

I used my dad's Camping Gas stove for years before getting an MSR Superfly stove with autostart. I've been using it for years, it fits in a pot and you can use virtually any gas bottle with it. The flame is adjustable and the pot is very stable on it. I've done mountaineering, I've done road trips, I've done camping, and I've used it more than once when the power went out at my flat :laughing:

So I'd say you can't go wrong with MSR, but it's just my humble opinion ^_^

Edited by ClemB

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I always went with the MSR Whisperlite. Design hasn't changed since I bought mine 20 years ago.

Very reliable..

The very best.

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http://www.optimusstoves.com/seen/optimus-products/products/katadynshopconnect/optimus-outdoor-kocher/optimus-nova-1/

 

I've been running an Optimus Nova Plus for years. I ran into a Sweddish Soldier over seas that turned me on to them. It can burn nearly any liquid fuel. I have ran diesel and gasoline in mine, the gas was out of nessecity though and I do not recommend it, very scary. The bottles are easily refilled and come in many different sizes. I also have a MSR Whisperlite, but for some reason I just perfer the simplicity of the Optimus.

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I am partial to the MSR Pocket Rocket. It's light, simple, easy to light, fits anywhere and it always works. I have used it in the middle of winter in eastern Washington in freezing temps and it still worked. It is a tad sensitive to wind, but most stoves are without a windscreen. It's a powerful stove for it's size, I have used it for everything from boiling water to making eggs, bacon and hashbrowns. It will fit in most, if not all cooksets. I also take it on day hikes with me to make a quick cup of soup or coffee on colder days. It works real well with stainless steel water bottles or cups. It's only real drawback is using canisters, but once you get you to your fuel usage, you learn to know how to gauge how much fuel you have left. I had two 8oz canisters last me a month of boiling 500ml-1l of water every day.

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I haven't had the opportunity to try it out yet, but I recently received a BioLite camp stove as a gift. It burns kindling or woodchips. Packed, it's about the size of the common Nalgene water bottle, but fairly heavy. It has the advantage, though, of incorporating heat to electricity transfer to charge phones, lights etc. through a USB port.

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I think the concept was brilliant...

If backpacking, two pounds is a bit more than fairly heavy.

Might be fun to play with car camping or stick in a bug-out bag though.

Reviews didn't fare well for backpackers, with the weight and little charge to burn time ratio.

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My go to unit is the Jet Boil Sol. Lightweight and fits the need for hot water. I usually only carry dehydrated foods and drinks so it is a perfect piece for me.

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Trail Designs Sidewinder Ti-Tri Cooking System user here. I have used it about 40 to 50 nights now and I am very happy with its operation and efficiency. The big thing for me is that it is so quiet and really not that slow either. I also find I can either relax a bit or a few little jobs done whilst it is boiling the billy. I use it at lunch for a cup of tea as well as breakfast and dinner.

 

IMG_27921.jpg?resize=550%2C412

 

P8260512.jpg?resize=550%2C414

 

Regards

Andrew

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I am a stove fanatic. I don't know why.

I own or have owned the following

MSR

Pocket Rocket canister stove

Whisper Light white gas stove

Coleman

Exponent white gas stove

Optimus

Crux canister stove

Crux light canister stove

Esbit solid fuel tab stove

Stereo gel fuel stove

 

My favorite stove of them all is the Optimus Crux. It packs down to near nothing and nests under your fuel container that nests in the Terra Solo cook set. Small lightweight cook kit.

In winter I use either the Colman or the Whisper Light. White gas performs better in winter than Iso Butane.

I don't use the Esbit or Sterno fuel stoves much. I have about 4 or 5 of them stashed around for emergencies mainly.

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I prefer isobutane myself. What are you looking for specifically? I can give suggestions. I used to sell backpacking gear for a living.

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I presently have

 

MSR Whisper Lite

MSR Dragonfly with a Bernie Dog Dragonfly tamer III

Kelly Kettle

Coleman 2 burner naptha

 

My Dragonfly is the most used followed by the Kelly Kettle

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:blink: I was out in the shed the other day doing a clean up of my climbing & backpacking gear. I happened upon a old dusty cardboard box. I found an old pair of Asolos boots still in great shape but the best find was my old OPTIMUS 99 BACKPACK CAMPSTOVE.

 

The smile on my face took sometime to go away as i remembered the climbs & hike this old workhorse provided me with a hot meal. :anibad: I think it is time to slowly take apart and replace the gaskets then firer up the memories over a cup of Apple cider. :rolleyes:

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I used to carry a gas stove and a canister but now I use one of these. It nestles nicely inside my mug and cooking pot along with a windshield made out of a disposable "bacofoil" aluminium roasting pan. It's led to many conversations and "make your own" tutorials with people I've met in the hills and the alcohol it runs off is easily available and fairly cheap.

 

Edited by vw_k

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I backpacked a section of the Mountains to Sea Trail in North Carolina last year. Although I own a Coleman backpacking stove that has served me well I made an alcohol stove from two soft drink cans and it worked great! I may never use my Coleman again. Here is a link to a blog post about the trip.

https://michigantraveler.org/2015/10/30/hiking-the-mountains-to-sea-trail/

 

And this is a link to how to make an Alcohol Stove.

http://www.thesodacanstove.com/alcohol-stove/how-to-build.html

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Thank you all for an interesting topic. I admire the amount of knowledge that is out there.

I prefer a DIY beer can stove. I made mine from an aluminum water bottle from a dollar store because it looked like it was heavier gauge,

I chose alcohol because it makes for a less horrible spill than most other liquid fuels.

I also like to have the ability to pack a small, med, or large bottle  of fuel depending on the length of stay.

 

ALSO, have you considered a pie plate? I've noticed than the wilderness areas in my province have banned campfires, but allow hikers to use a 'fire pan' to cook meals.

 

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Oooh!  Nice bump.  Since this thread was started years ago, I've gotten into the "ultralight backpacking" craze.  It allows me to hike farther and with more enjoyment, now that my creaky middle-aged body fights back when asked to carry a heavy load on its back.

For cooking, I use the MSR Pocket Rocket.  The stove itself is like 3 inches long.  Weights are as follows:  stove and case 3.9 ounces, fuel canister 7.5 ounces, and MSR piezo ignitor, .4 ounces.  A total of 11.8 ounces, and it all fits inside my titanium cook pot.  Tip: bring along a folded sheet of aluminum foil to serve as a windscreen.  Add in a plastic heat-resistant drinking cup (for coffee), a long-handled titanium spoon, and a stuff sack to hold everything, and my total cook system weight is just a hair more than one pound.

If one buys the MSR brand of fuel canister, there is a built-in gauge on the side which tells you how much fuel is left. (You float the canister in a pot of water and see how far it sinks.)  The advertised burn time for an 8 ounce canister is one hour, and it only takes 2 or 3 minutes to boil water for a warm freeze dried breakfast and a cup of coffee.  After cooking four meals on my last adventure, I checked my canister and it wasn't even a third gone.

MSR-PocketRocket-Review.jpg

Edited by The Leprechauns
  • Upvote 4

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Winter: MSR Whisper Lite International, using white gas. 

Summer Backpack: Jetboil Flash - We eat mostly freeze dried on the trail, so this works. Boils insanely fast, <400g for the stove, AND cook pot.

Summer Car Camp: Dual Burner propane Coleman (found at Walmart)

 

Wood Stoves aren't a great idea in this area (West Coast Canada); They're banned when campfire bans are on. Trails that are manned by a ranger will actually stop and turn you away with them. 

  • Upvote 1

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On 30.08.2017 at 6:48 AM, Think Tink said:

Wood Stoves aren't a great idea in this area (West Coast Canada); They're banned when campfire bans are on. Trails that are manned by a ranger will actually stop and turn you away with them. 

Thanks for the clarification! I wasn't aware of that. 

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Well, wood stoves aren't looks so bad, but what about dampness? would it be a problem?

Edited by jensaito

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