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Wet Log, Replace


yaknar
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I am still new to geocaching, only 4 finds so far. Today I found a micro cache that contained a wet,damp,log. The container looked ok. I think someone did not screw the lid on tight. At the time I did not have any paper to put inside it. Since then I have found several places on the web where you can print out logs, Techblazer. My question is...Should I remove the old log and replace it with a new one or just report it and let the cache owner do it?

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With a micro cache like that, I will replace the log and make note of my actions in a Needs Maintenance log. I let the Co know that I will hold onto the old log for 2 weeks in case they want to keep it. I have yet to have a CO contact me to have a log returned.

 

I don't mean to be confrontational, but did any cache owner ever respond?

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I have yet to find a cache owner that has not appreciated there logs beeing replaced.

I would replace it and then send a note letting them know.

I am still new to geocaching, only 4 finds so far. Today I found a micro cache that contained a wet,damp,log. The container looked ok. I think someone did not screw the lid on tight. At the time I did not have any paper to put inside it. Since then I have found several places on the web where you can print out logs, Techblazer. My question is...Should I remove the old log and replace it with a new one or just report it and let the cache owner do it?

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I've added log sheets to lots of caches, when the existing log was full, wet, or otherwise unusable. I've also dried out soggy logs (e.g., in the sun or over my vehicle's defroster). But I wouldn't take the existing log, no matter how bad its condition.

We have become quite talented at drying logs, even in the winter. A little sun and wind is all you need. For books, the car heater if nearby. The trickiest part is carefully pealing back layers.

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I would replace and include it in my log. Can't think of a cache owner who wouldn't appreciate that. I carry logs made out of Rite in the Rain paper, in several sizes.

 

I agree.

An unreadable, unsignable, piece of pulp isn't doing anyone any good. If I can I add a log...if there is no room I put a new one in and hold on to the old one....I log the cache as a find with a note about the log.

After hundreds of logs replaced I've yet had an owner mail me wanting the old log.

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Rather or not I replace it depends on a few things!

#1: If it's someone that I see often and have met, then there's a good chance I will and then I'll email them let them know I have the old log and they can tell me to pitch it, or bring it to the next event.

#2: If it's a cache that I'm going to find and I'm not familiar with the cache owner and that CO's cache's clearly show a lack of maintenance history, then I'm going to leave it just like I found it and join the needs maintenance brigade.

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Rather or not I replace it depends on a few things!

#1: If it's someone that I see often and have met, then there's a good chance I will and then I'll email them let them know I have the old log and they can tell me to pitch it, or bring it to the next event.

#2: If it's a cache that I'm going to find and I'm not familiar with the cache owner and that CO's cache's clearly show a lack of maintenance history, then I'm going to leave it just like I found it and join the needs maintenance brigade.

 

Yes. Same here. If I know the CO has a good reputation regarding cache placements and maintenance, I'll pitch in with some help (a piece of paper to tide the cache over, duct tape to close a crack in the container, whittle the pencil nib if it needs sharpening, wipe down any moisture buildup, remove any junk swag). I will mention the maintenance help in my online log, especially if there's still an issue with the cache - e.g. paper will last for a couple of weeks but the cache still needs a new logbook.

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I'm still new to this, so very cautious about getting things wrong. I was planning a walk and noticed from the logs that one cache I was planning find was reported as wet. I emailed the CO in advance and asked if I could be of assistance with some maintenance if it was needed. The CO replied that it would be very nice if I could help, and that if any of their other caches needed minor work, they would really appreciate any help. So now I always carry some spare logs, zip lock bags and tissues to dry out damp containers. I see minor maintenance as just good manners. I like finding caches in good condition, so it's only fair that I help to make sure other geocachers have the same experience.

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I'm still new to this, so very cautious about getting things wrong. I was planning a walk and noticed from the logs that one cache I was planning find was reported as wet. I emailed the CO in advance and asked if I could be of assistance with some maintenance if it was needed. The CO replied that it would be very nice if I could help, and that if any of their other caches needed minor work, they would really appreciate any help. So now I always carry some spare logs, zip lock bags and tissues to dry out damp containers. I see minor maintenance as just good manners. I like finding caches in good condition, so it's only fair that I help to make sure other geocachers have the same experience.

 

Maxx you are a fine cacher, like that you think of others and not just your own ego. Sometimes it is not the fault of the container. Sometimes FTF hounds or people trying to rack up big number do not seal the container properly. Never hurts to be kind once in a while.

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Sometimes it is not the fault of the container. Sometimes ..... do not seal the container properly. Never hurts to be kind once in a while.

 

Yes. I've seen that happen once in a while. Mostly lock n lock containers with a baggie caught in the seal.

If the container is a good one, watertight when used properly, I have cleaned it up, wiped it down, added a new baggie.

But if the container is a poor choice (e.g. margarine tub, gladware disposable, glass pickle jar, disposable food container, index card case, cookie tin) there's no point providing some TLC. I would post an NM.

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If I found a container like that, I'd probably just walk away from it. If I went home and found it had a rack of NMs and an owner that hadn't cached in a year, I'd log an NA. When it got archived, I'd go back and chuck the thing in the trash.

 

I don't like earning smileys on things that really don't make me smile.

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I'm still new to this, so very cautious about getting things wrong. I was planning a walk and noticed from the logs that one cache I was planning find was reported as wet. I emailed the CO in advance and asked if I could be of assistance with some maintenance if it was needed. The CO replied that it would be very nice if I could help, and that if any of their other caches needed minor work, they would really appreciate any help. So now I always carry some spare logs, zip lock bags and tissues to dry out damp containers. I see minor maintenance as just good manners. I like finding caches in good condition, so it's only fair that I help to make sure other geocachers have the same experience.

 

Keep doing what you're doing.......it will be much appreciated by CO's and those that find the cache after you.

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I'm still new to this, so very cautious about getting things wrong. I was planning a walk and noticed from the logs that one cache I was planning find was reported as wet. I emailed the CO in advance and asked if I could be of assistance with some maintenance if it was needed. The CO replied that it would be very nice if I could help, and that if any of their other caches needed minor work, they would really appreciate any help. So now I always carry some spare logs, zip lock bags and tissues to dry out damp containers. I see minor maintenance as just good manners. I like finding caches in good condition, so it's only fair that I help to make sure other geocachers have the same experience.

 

Keep doing what you're doing.......it will be much appreciated by CO's and those that find the cache after you.

 

+10 & @maxx... welcome to the fun.

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I do replace wet log sheet but once in a while I'll come up to to a log sheet that is slam full of logs. To me that is really cool. I will replace that log if there is room to put in a new log sheet and I will put a note on the cache that the log sheet is full. But if its that cool looking I will leave the log sheet in there and add a new one.

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Here's one I found recently. It's been wet since 2008 without a response from the owner (who is active and has over 300 hides). One NM in 2008 another posted this Fall. Would you place a logsheet in a baggie in this (not water tight) cache?

 

8226682419_4e404f9131_c.jpg

Edited by L0ne R
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Replacing a wet log doesn't solve the issue of an unsuitable container.

 

Or unsuitable owner. I read the rules before I placed mine, and intend to keep them maintained. If I don't, I expect the complaint (needs maintenance) to be logged to let me know I'm not doing so good at ownership. I prefer to be a good owner than slow down cachers with the maintenance of my caches. If I have a repeat problem with a container, I re-evaluate the hide and try to change the container to meet the demands of the hide or change the hide to meet the demands of the container. I live in the south, where in the winter, one day it's 70 degrees and sunny, the next day, it's 35 degrees and raining. As you can imagine, most anything here will take on water if left in the elements. In most cases, containers here need another container to keep the weather off, that is actually ventilated so that it just acts as an umbrella to keep the free water off the cache container. The exceptions, of course, are containers designed for humid weather, and even immersion (military ammo cans).

 

When I go caching, I go to FIND caches, not to maintain them. That is what ownership is supposed to take care of. Like others, though, if I know the owner, and know that owner normally puts in the efforts to take care of his stuff, yep, I'll change the log and tell him I did. I won't put a NM on one that I maintain. What's the point? I just did the maintenance. But I do note that activity in the find log. If I'm in a different state, or see a pattern of poor maintenance, then I log the NM and never look back. The guidelines are VERY clear to me about what to do with an unsuitable cache. That said, though, be ready to be called out by a cache owner if you run a series they've neglected, and find 11 out of 12 caches that you have to stop and dry the log to ink it for the find. Owners with high find counts tend to be the touchiest about their hides and use the excuse they're out findng more instead of maintaining the one ones they hide, or that they have too many hides to maintain all of them. NONE seem to understand that they're already admitting to the real problem. I'm more subject to photographing a soggy log for the proof I found it an attach that to a found log. That also depends on the nature or quality of the hide. It isn't my fault if the cache is in pitiful condition when I find it (unless it's mine) and if I find it, I'm logging a find whether I can sign the log or not. I photographed as many as 9 on a series in a remote area in a national forest that had a control burn done for underbrush. Many caches in that series did not fare well, and in many cases, the container was melted shut and the log inaccessible, therefore, unsignable. I found them, though, and I claimed the finds. I could not replace them, because they were a themed series, with special log sheets used for the series. I found several throw-downs in that series as well, which seriously detracted from the whole intent of the series. HOWEVER, I NEVER log a find if I don't find it, I NEVER log a NM on a cache I do not find, and ALWAYS log a DNF on one I cannot find with reasonable effort for the difficulty level. I NEVER assume one is missing or needs maintenance if I can't find it, but more often than not, we have several cachers in our area that are too willing to throw down a replacement for a find. That is cheating in it's simplest form. I won't cheat at a hobby. Not much point in having a hobby I have to be dishonest about.

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Replacing a wet log doesn't solve the issue of an unsuitable container.

 

Or unsuitable owner. I read the rules before I placed mine, and intend to keep them maintained. If I don't, I expect the complaint (needs maintenance) to be logged to let me know I'm not doing so good at ownership. I prefer to be a good owner than slow down cachers with the maintenance of my caches. If I have a repeat problem with a container, I re-evaluate the hide and try to change the container to meet the demands of the hide or change the hide to meet the demands of the container. I live in the south, where in the winter, one day it's 70 degrees and sunny, the next day, it's 35 degrees and raining. As you can imagine, most anything here will take on water if left in the elements. In most cases, containers here need another container to keep the weather off, that is actually ventilated so that it just acts as an umbrella to keep the free water off the cache container. The exceptions, of course, are containers designed for humid weather, and even immersion (military ammo cans).

 

When I go caching, I go to FIND caches, not to maintain them. That is what ownership is supposed to take care of. Like others, though, if I know the owner, and know that owner normally puts in the efforts to take care of his stuff, yep, I'll change the log and tell him I did. I won't put a NM on one that I maintain. What's the point? I just did the maintenance. But I do note that activity in the find log. If I'm in a different state, or see a pattern of poor maintenance, then I log the NM and never look back. The guidelines are VERY clear to me about what to do with an unsuitable cache. That said, though, be ready to be called out by a cache owner if you run a series they've neglected, and find 11 out of 12 caches that you have to stop and dry the log to ink it for the find. Owners with high find counts tend to be the touchiest about their hides and use the excuse they're out findng more instead of maintaining the one ones they hide, or that they have too many hides to maintain all of them. NONE seem to understand that they're already admitting to the real problem. I'm more subject to photographing a soggy log for the proof I found it an attach that to a found log. That also depends on the nature or quality of the hide. It isn't my fault if the cache is in pitiful condition when I find it (unless it's mine) and if I find it, I'm logging a find whether I can sign the log or not. I photographed as many as 9 on a series in a remote area in a national forest that had a control burn done for underbrush. Many caches in that series did not fare well, and in many cases, the container was melted shut and the log inaccessible, therefore, unsignable. I found them, though, and I claimed the finds. I could not replace them, because they were a themed series, with special log sheets used for the series. I found several throw-downs in that series as well, which seriously detracted from the whole intent of the series. HOWEVER, I NEVER log a find if I don't find it, I NEVER log a NM on a cache I do not find, and ALWAYS log a DNF on one I cannot find with reasonable effort for the difficulty level. I NEVER assume one is missing or needs maintenance if I can't find it, but more often than not, we have several cachers in our area that are too willing to throw down a replacement for a find. That is cheating in it's simplest form. I won't cheat at a hobby. Not much point in having a hobby I have to be dishonest about.

 

If you are ever in Eastern Iowa, look me up. We'll go caching

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Or unsuitable owner. I read the rules before I placed mine, and intend to keep them maintained. If I don't, I expect the complaint (needs maintenance) to be logged to let me know I'm not doing so good at ownership. I prefer to be a good owner than slow down cachers with the maintenance of my caches. If I have a repeat problem with a container, I re-evaluate the hide and try to change the container to meet the demands of the hide or change the hide to meet the demands of the container. I live in the south, where in the winter, one day it's 70 degrees and sunny, the next day, it's 35 degrees and raining. As you can imagine, most anything here will take on water if left in the elements. In most cases, containers here need another container to keep the weather off, that is actually ventilated so that it just acts as an umbrella to keep the free water off the cache container. The exceptions, of course, are containers designed for humid weather, and even immersion (military ammo cans).

 

When I go caching, I go to FIND caches, not to maintain them. That is what ownership is supposed to take care of. Like others, though, if I know the owner, and know that owner normally puts in the efforts to take care of his stuff, yep, I'll change the log and tell him I did. I won't put a NM on one that I maintain. What's the point? I just did the maintenance. But I do note that activity in the find log. If I'm in a different state, or see a pattern of poor maintenance, then I log the NM and never look back. The guidelines are VERY clear to me about what to do with an unsuitable cache. That said, though, be ready to be called out by a cache owner if you run a series they've neglected, and find 11 out of 12 caches that you have to stop and dry the log to ink it for the find. Owners with high find counts tend to be the touchiest about their hides and use the excuse they're out findng more instead of maintaining the one ones they hide, or that they have too many hides to maintain all of them. NONE seem to understand that they're already admitting to the real problem. I'm more subject to photographing a soggy log for the proof I found it an attach that to a found log. That also depends on the nature or quality of the hide. It isn't my fault if the cache is in pitiful condition when I find it (unless it's mine) and if I find it, I'm logging a find whether I can sign the log or not. I photographed as many as 9 on a series in a remote area in a national forest that had a control burn done for underbrush. Many caches in that series did not fare well, and in many cases, the container was melted shut and the log inaccessible, therefore, unsignable. I found them, though, and I claimed the finds. I could not replace them, because they were a themed series, with special log sheets used for the series. I found several throw-downs in that series as well, which seriously detracted from the whole intent of the series. HOWEVER, I NEVER log a find if I don't find it, I NEVER log a NM on a cache I do not find, and ALWAYS log a DNF on one I cannot find with reasonable effort for the difficulty level. I NEVER assume one is missing or needs maintenance if I can't find it, but more often than not, we have several cachers in our area that are too willing to throw down a replacement for a find. That is cheating in it's simplest form. I won't cheat at a hobby. Not much point in having a hobby I have to be dishonest about.

 

We usually carry repair items and log sheets and tiny baggies with us when we cache in order to do minor repairs . This is for the benefit of the other cachers as well as the CO. We carry those supplies with us on our many caching trips and do what we can to help the caches and CO's.

 

I think unwillingness or inability to do maintenance has to do with the kind of person involved, not the number of hides.

 

PAul

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I think unwillingness or inability to do maintenance has to do with the kind of person involved, not the number of hides.

 

PAul

 

True, but those that hide many and fail to maintain tend to stand out

 

and by the shear volume cause a noticeable problem.

 

I agree that if a cacher is not maintaining their caches, it is more noticeable if that person has hidden a large number of caches.

 

However I do not agree that persons who hide a lot of caches (or find a lot of caches) are more likely to fail to maintain.

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2012 in the UK seems to be the wettest we can remember. Lock tight caches which have survived for years with out problems have not coped with the constant deluge of water they have been subjected to. For that reason we carry spare bags and logs and dry the cache out as best we can. If the log is just a little damp we put it in a new bag (don't have the luxury of time to be drying it out)but sometimes the log has completely disintergrated and there is nothing left to put into a bag e or send to the owner... We always let the owner know with an email or NM log what we have done.

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Personally I think it is the owner to maintain the cache, but that doesn't stop people from performing acts of goodwill. So people who don't do maintenance for the owner and just NM it, That's fine, nothing wrong with that. If someone goes beyond that and is willing to take steps to help it out, then they have just gone that extra step and I think that is great. Not necessary but great.

 

As to what form or shape your goodwill takes I don't think an owner should complain how someone does it. Just thank them for caring enough to do something about it. Thats my two cents anyways.

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I agree. I try to keep maintenance items with me... but not just for the CO, but for the folks behind me. I just seems rude not to fix something that needs it.

 

other thoughts:

I NEVER remove log sheets. If they're wet I try to dry them. If they're a lost cause I leave them as is and add dry ones in a baggie, that way I can sign it and so can the people behind me.

 

I NEVER log a find if I can't sign the log. I've ran across caches I can't reach or get to or I'm afraid to... if I don't sign it I don't log it. Period.

 

Not all COs like help... or maybe they don't like it posted online...

:( Had one CO email me directly and they started their email with "thanks for your unsolicited help, but when I put out a cache..."

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I wouldn't mind in the least if someone found my caches and if for some reason the log was soaking and they then replaced the log or put in a new piece of paper. I have done this in the past to help out the CO of any we have found that were wet through. If the cache was a micro and no room for more paper then I have taken the soaked log and put a new one in, then once home I email the CO to let them know what I have done, and if needed I would post on the log. so far no one has asked me to post on a log, I know I would't want them back :-) I have had emails back thanking me for doing a spot of maintenance on their cache.

it all helps to hopefully keep the game moving along.

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I think it's a help to the CO when people post a log or an NM explaining any issues with the cache - almost full logbook, container not watertight, moldy contents, lid developing a crack, tab starting to break off.

 

It's a help to the community when people post NMs and NAs when the cache appears to be neglected or abandoned. Adding a logsheet keeps the cache limping along but prolongs the inevitable.

 

Example:

 

1c58e40e-95c5-48ec-8aaa-b2260a9ad385.jpg

 

I posted NM in May then in July the next finder put a logsheet in it. A month later someone posted that the cache was filled with water and the log ruined. I posted an NA. The active owner disabled it that day and left a note saying they'd check on it soon. 2 months later the cache got a Reviewer Note. 3 months later the reviewer archived it.

 

Placing a logsheet in this cache to help the next finder, doesn't make for a nice experience for the next finder. If I was the next potential finder, I'd rather it had a NM on it so that I could filter it out of my PQs, until the CO got around to fixing the cache and removing the NM.

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I think unwillingness or inability to do maintenance has to do with the kind of person involved, not the number of hides.

 

PAul

 

True, but those that hide many and fail to maintain tend to stand out

 

and by the shear volume cause a noticeable problem.

 

I agree that if a cacher is not maintaining their caches, it is more noticeable if that person has hidden a large number of caches.

 

However I do not agree that persons who hide a lot of caches (or find a lot of caches) are more likely to fail to maintain.

 

You are correct. One cacher with two abandoned caches is no different than one cacher who abandoned 10-15. We're just still cleaning up after three cachers who abandoned 10-15 each.

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