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question what is a booger?


KBlack2595
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I just saw this as a hint in a cache in southern California, and I mentioned in my Found It log that I had no idea what it meant. The CO sent me a note to explain that it's one of those big green electrical boxes that are often found along the side of roads and in parking lots.

 

I agree with Gitchee-Gummee: I hope it's a term that stays exclusive to southern California.

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The term "bugger" is a profanity term used by Brits many years ago. My grandfather, born in 1883, would use the term usually preceeded by "bloody". If he hit his thumb or other injury those were the first words out. Or if someone was a really bad person he would be so described by those words. Those 2 words combined were about the foulest language an Englishman could use. I'm sure if you do a web search you'll find the old meaning of the term.

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The term "bugger" is a profanity term used by Brits many years ago. My grandfather, born in 1883, would use the term usually preceeded by "bloody". If he hit his thumb or other injury those were the first words out. Or if someone was a really bad person he would be so described by those words. Those 2 words combined were about the foulest language an Englishman could use. I'm sure if you do a web search you'll find the old meaning of the term.

 

Not the worst that would be used in these parts. It's still used now and it's used more like "oh no" like "oh bugger it"

"you bloody bugger" is used for many things( one being that you're trying to do something and it's not working out so great, you know like thread a needle but you can't)!

 

In some schools (round my parts anywho) kids get away with saying it also the word sod. Which again can be used like bugger it but it's oh sod or oh sod it. They're minor swears round these part these days. :)

 

On topic. Sorry not heard the term but someone else has above so that's okay :)

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The term "bugger" is a profanity term used by Brits many years ago. My grandfather, born in 1883, would use the term usually preceeded by "bloody". If he hit his thumb or other injury those were the first words out. Or if someone was a really bad person he would be so described by those words. Those 2 words combined were about the foulest language an Englishman could use. I'm sure if you do a web search you'll find the old meaning of the term.

 

Not the worst that would be used in these parts. It's still used now and it's used more like "oh no" like "oh bugger it"

"you bloody bugger" is used for many things( one being that you're trying to do something and it's not working out so great, you know like thread a needle but you can't)!

 

In some schools (round my parts anywho) kids get away with saying it also the word sod. Which again can be used like bugger it but it's oh sod or oh sod it. They're minor swears round these part these days. :)

 

On topic. Sorry not heard the term but someone else has above so that's okay :)

You have got to remember the time frame when my grandfather used the phrase. He was born in 1883 and came to the US in 1904. Into the 1950s and even 60s that just wasn't proper language to use in mixed company. The term was a shortened word for buggery. If you don't know what buggery means then do a websearch. I'm sure some where on the web is the definition. It's still a term used in some legal statutes. In common language tho it was considered a vulgar term and calling someone a buggerer was sure to get you in a fight.

Edited by Wadcutter
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