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Group of Kids Geocaching...HELP!


wdeontray
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I am taking a group of 30 kids geocaching. I can split them into two however, so about 15 kids for a hour. I never even went geocaching myself so this will be hard. I read tons about it but does anyone have any tips? Also, I want to set up my own caches so the kids won't steal them (and less risk). How in the world do you set up your own PRIVATE caches?

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I am taking a group of 30 kids geocaching. I can split them into two however, so about 15 kids for a hour. I never even went geocaching myself so this will be hard. I read tons about it but does anyone have any tips? Also, I want to set up my own caches so the kids won't steal them (and less risk). How in the world do you set up your own PRIVATE caches?

 

I would go to a park with easily identifiable landmarks and place a cache there and have a hint or picture of where the next cache will be...

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Good idea! So how do I actually set up the cache? Like, for them to find...I can only find preexisting caches but nothing on setting your own/

This website is for pre-existing caches. If you want to set up a temporary or example cache, then just set it up and write it up in word. Then print it out and send them on their adventure.

 

When we have done temp caches for Fairs and Boy scouts we place a nice ammocan or large plastic container with a logbook and some toys in it for the kids to find. We try to make one or two easy ones and then one hidden harder.

 

If you are doing this in a public area, be sure to make them clear plastic so people don't think the kids are doing something dangerous...

 

When placing, keep the boxes away from busy roads and dangerous cliffs too...

 

Good luck!

Jennifer

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How long do you have before this event? Because I would really suggest you get some practice with the GPS before the day of (unless you're already familiar with how they operate). Even go out an find some caches so you can develop some ideas how to hide one. You don't want to be out there fumbling around with how to input a waypoint with a bunch if antsy kids waiting on you.

 

For the kind of event you're talking about, I would just make up some descriptions, with coordinates, in a Word document and hand them out for the kids to go out and find. I wouldn't worry about listing them on GC.com for a couple of reasons:

 

- GC.com has no provision for temporary or one-day caches. Caches are approved on the assumption that they will have some permanence, and more importantly, that once placed the owner (you) will maintain it, check on it periodically, and address any maintenance issues that arise for as long as the cache is out there. And also to remove it from the environment and archive it when you are no longer willing or able to maintain it. It's a bit like adopting a pet...you have to be committed to taking care of it long term. If you are not willing to make this commitment, please don't list it.

 

- If you do list it, you have no control over when it will be published or who will see the listing and go find it before your event. You may go out the day of the event and find that all your cool swag stuff has already been swapped out for golf balls and Happy Meal toys.

 

But for your purposes, for now at least, an unlisted private cache might work best.

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Yeah I will either spend 4 hours before the lesson starts, or just move the lesson back. But let me cement this, so I decide where I want to place my item. Say its gold. I would go to place gold in its spot. I use my GPS to find those coordinates. Say 1,2. Then I give the kids a sheet with a picture or hint and the coordinates 1,2. Correct?

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Yeah I will either spend 4 hours before the lesson starts, or just move the lesson back. But let me cement this, so I decide where I want to place my item. Say its gold. I would go to place gold in its spot. I use my GPS to find those coordinates. Say 1,2. Then I give the kids a sheet with a picture or hint and the coordinates 1,2. Correct?

Yes, go find a spot to hide "gold" and then while you're standing there, right at the hiding spot, take a reading with your GPS (so you know what coordinates you're standing at). Write those coordinates down and incorporate them into a sheet for the kids (assuming the kids will have a GPS or two to use during the finding process). Once the kids find that spot using the GPS, then the hint can make it easier to find the container at that spot (because no GPS is totally accurate, and it's as likely as not to lead them to a spot 20 feet away from where that container really is).

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I would highly recommend finding a local cacher in your area who is willing to help you.

There are caching pages for a lot of areas. Where are you located? What state or country?

 

There are a lot of cachers who give classes already who could be a great help to you.

 

You need to spend more time than 4 hours before the event.

What happens if you don't "get it" in those four hours? Where are you going to find help?

 

You need to practice for four hours two weeks before the event.

And you need to find someone to do the event with you who's got some experience.

 

It seems simple, but there is a whole lot to know about caching and GPS systems. You just don't have the experience and you haven't got the time to get it.

 

Get help on this!!! kay?

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A group of 15 is rather large. I do this at my elementary school, and while the PE teacher has the rest of the class, I take 4 or 5 students to go find 4 containers I've hidden around the school yard. Four students is about the right size (for me, anyway). One holds the GPS, one holds the 'cache page' (an index card with D/T info, size, etc) and the others search. With a smaller group I can rotate the roles so all really get a chance. Good luck!

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it takes a few hrs at least to get into it, and see the idea and feel the fun.

I normally only take 2-4 compleetly new kids and parents, else it ends up in total confusion.

I prefer to spend a halve a day, like bring lunch packs and show them how to enjoy the nature too.

 

we have a few very good beginners caches in my area, I know them since I found them all.

I mean it is very hard for you to find such good beginner caches

or even make them your self, if you have no idea or experiance,

who not ask a local cacher to pop up and show you alot more

or even ask him also to show up when the kids do = much better...

Edited by OZ2CPU
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SolSeeker's advice is good, try to find a local cacher who could either show you the ropes before the event day, or maybe would even come help you with the event. In order to find a cacher near you, log on to Geocaching.com and under "Play", go to "Hide and Seek a Cache" (have you tried logging on and getting familiar with the website yet?). Browse through some caches near you...on the cache page under the cache name is the name of the cache owner. You'll likely find a handful of cachers who are responsible for the majority of the caches in your area. These are the folks who are (hopefully) still active in the local caching community. You can start by contacting them through GC.com via the link on the cache page.

 

The reason I say contact local cache OWNERS instead of just finders who have logged the caches in the area, is that finders could be passing through from anywhere, whereas the hiders probably live fairly nearby

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If the kids are big into stats, you could just archive the cache the day it was published and let them all log it. That's happened a few times for temporary caches in my area.

 

Sometimes I think you think up the worst possible advice you can come up with, and you're trolling us. :ph34r: So yes, horrible advice. That would be in violation of the cache permenance wording in the guidelines. And if you or anyone else in your area has pulled that stunt, it involved lying to your reviewer.

 

No, the kids aren't into stats. Neither they nor the OP has Geocached before. :)

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Wondering if perhaps given time constraints, that a better approach would be to start by emulating a Letterbox.

 

Normally No GPS, just the clues. Sometimes hints. Often various knowledge / logic testing questions/puzzles.

 

All of that could be worked out fairly quickly and with existing experience of all concerned. I guess one or two might involve use of a GPS. Perhaps just the first stage to find the first clue to the next box. Or maybe a final for the ones who complete the set as a bonus. Fewer complex rules as well.

 

Don't take this as putting off on Geocaching, I'm just thinking about logistics for THIS time. We just had a 'private' cache challenge as part of our July 1st celebrations. Fun, and well thought out, but... the advertising sort of fizzled until word of mouth kicked in. I'm willing to bet next year will be much better. Part was that it required people to have their own GPS and know how to use it. I think everyone who actually played the game were already Geocachers, but more could have been done to reach newbies or wannabes. So timing and logistics is very important.

 

Doug 7rxc

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The largest group I've ever taken out geocaching was about a dozen people. That works well, as long as a few of those dozen people were adults who could help supervise the kids.

 

When I've helped teach geocaching classes with more people than that, we've divided the newcomers into groups of 3 or 4 people, and assigned one experienced geocacher to each group. That works very well.

 

When I teach kids at church about geocaching, I spend some "classroom time" teaching them the basic concepts, and then I take them to a small area where I've hidden a dozen or two containers. (I don't use the GPSr; I just lead them to the location.) I have them raise their hands when they spot a cache, then tell me which cache they spotted when I call on them. This works for groups of 20 or more kids, but the more kids you have, the more containers you have to hide so everyone can have a chance, and the more non-geocaching adults you need to help with crowd control.

 

I wouldn't take such a large group to search for a real geocache though. I'd break into groups of no more than a dozen (including the adults who are helping supervise), with one experienced geocacher per group.

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