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Hurricane Luke

Geocache in a Library?

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Hi all,

I have received permission to place a geocache in a local library from the library manager, and now the goal is implementation to get it created - my initial thought was to make it a multicache that starts outside the library, people answer a bunch of questions to obtain the coordinates for a library computer which they then go to, and there they do a few more calculations to determine the dewey decimal number of a book (I was thinking of using "The Joy of Geocaching" perhaps? :) ), and have the cache hidden inside the book (a la Andy Dufresne hiding the rock hammer in the bible in Shawshank Redemption). It would be appropriately marked as reference, but still have all the barcodes on it, and maybe even a stealthily placed international geocaching logo. A second copy would also be purchased and donated to the library.

 

While this all sounds great, the local reviewer has recently told me:

 

Please remember that you'll need to have GPS coordinates as part of this one: perhaps a starting point with the dewey decimal # of the book in it, and an approximate distance (or similar clue).

 

Okay - that sort of puts a stopper in my plan! (Let me just say before I finish, The reviewer in question here is fantastic - he's helped me out of dozens of issues previously. This isn't me having a rant about how there's too many rules, etc etc. In fact I can almost agree with him that GPS coordinates are always integral to a cache). But, I am still pretty keen on having the final of the cache INSIDE the library, INSIDE the book; and not just as a stage of the cache.

 

So - my question becomes... Can anyone think of a guideline-acceptable, clever, scheming way to have the final of the cache inside a book, and yet still make the use of the dewey decimal system as part of the multicache? :)

 

Let's see what ideas are generated!

 

Cheers,

Luke.

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The final cache itself doesn't have to be "100% GPS coordinates." There are plenty of caches (e.g. underground, or in buildings) which effectively say "Go to these coordinates (GPS-related), then do XYZ (not GPS-related) to find the cache." Of course, if it's clear from the cache page that the cache is in the town library, a reviewer may deem the library's GPS coordinates alone to have little or not enough significance (compared to just following the town signs to the library!).

 

So that's when, for a multi-stage cache, you might have one or more GPS stages to find first (e.g. which give you more essential library hunting information). These stages could be virtual (e.g. spotting digits/characters that are assembled into the Dewey code, explained on the cache page) or physical (e.g. the cache page could be more mysterious, with the physical clue providing your library-based instructions as more of a surprise to Finders).

 

I like these sort of caches, so persevere and good luck.

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Hi all,

I have received permission to place a geocache in a local library from the library manager, and now the goal is implementation to get it created - my initial thought was to make it a multicache that starts outside the library, people answer a bunch of questions to obtain the coordinates for a library computer which they then go to, and there they do a few more calculations to determine the dewey decimal number of a book (I was thinking of using "The Joy of Geocaching" perhaps? :) ), and have the cache hidden inside the book (a la Andy Dufresne hiding the rock hammer in the bible in Shawshank Redemption). It would be appropriately marked as reference, but still have all the barcodes on it, and maybe even a stealthily placed international geocaching logo. A second copy would also be purchased and donated to the library.

 

While this all sounds great, the local reviewer has recently told me:

 

Please remember that you'll need to have GPS coordinates as part of this one: perhaps a starting point with the dewey decimal # of the book in it, and an approximate distance (or similar clue).

 

Okay - that sort of puts a stopper in my plan! (Let me just say before I finish, The reviewer in question here is fantastic - he's helped me out of dozens of issues previously. This isn't me having a rant about how there's too many rules, etc etc. In fact I can almost agree with him that GPS coordinates are always integral to a cache). But, I am still pretty keen on having the final of the cache INSIDE the library, INSIDE the book; and not just as a stage of the cache.

 

So - my question becomes... Can anyone think of a guideline-acceptable, clever, scheming way to have the final of the cache inside a book, and yet still make the use of the dewey decimal system as part of the multicache? :)

 

Let's see what ideas are generated!

 

Cheers,

Luke.

 

One of the library caches that I did had published coordinates at the front door of the library. The cache listing indicated that once you were there to go to a few additional waypoints that were close by where one obtained numbers from signs or counting items. Those numbers were then plugged into a "forumla" which was then used to locate the book.

 

You could also make it as a simple unknown cache where one has to obtain information in the library which is used to derive a set of coordinates for a physical container outside the library and the container would contain a laminated sheet of paper with a call number. If you worked with the library you might even be able attach a sheet with the coordinates of the container in an existing book that one can discover by looking it up in their online catalog.

 

I've thought about a few different ways to do a cache in a library as I work in a large university library myself. Unfortunately, there's a micro about 400 feet from our library that is blocking useful waypoint near my library. On the other hand, there are 16 libraries on campus I could also use.

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You can create a multi or a puzzle or a letterbox that starts somewhere outside the library and uses clues, coordinates, or puzzles to lead you inside. You can also have the inside portion full of clues lead the finders outside to find the final.

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dont make it too complex or too hard..

 

I did find a VERY clever cache placed INSIDE a library here in Denmark,

you need your GPS to find the place, so that is ok.

Then you need to figure out if geocaching is a SPORT or a HOBBY,

then look at the books there, you find ONE book that is "misplaced" and actually a little bit odd looking,

it took me 1½ hr to find THAT one book..

it looks like a book but is a SAFE !! with a lock,

and yes you need a KEY to open it and to sign the log book inside.

there is a clue written in the "book" about where in the library you can find the key,

that took me another ½ hr to find :-)

a friendly person working there told me a few hints, lucky me, else I still be there I guess.

 

this was a bit too hard and too time consuming for my taste,

got cold dinner that day :-(

but the kind of great feeling like a WINNER !! when solved is super cool :-)

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dont make it too complex or too hard..

Or make it complex and hard. Whatever works for you. :)

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Give the co-ordinates to a sign directing people to the library. Preferably the sign should be on the other side of town. (3-5 miles away, the library is OUT OF VIEW from the location)

Give the DD number as the hint.

Don't SAY the cache is in the library.

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I would assume that one reason you would put a cache in a library would be to introduce people to the library who don't normally get there. You're wanting to show people a cool place: the library.

In this spirit it would be great to expose kids to this great place.

I would keep any puzzles simple so kids could figure it out too.

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Why not what the reviewer suggested? Hide a container outside the library referenced by coordinates and put the Dewey Decimal number of the book inside the container.

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... my initial thought was to make it a multicache that starts outside the library, people answer a bunch of questions ... to determine the dewey decimal number of a book ...

 

While this all sounds great, the local reviewer has recently told me:

 

Please remember that you'll need to have GPS coordinates as part of this one: perhaps a starting point with the dewey decimal # of the book in it, and an approximate distance (or similar clue).

 

Seems to me you and the reviewer are saying exactly the same thing.

 

I fail to see what the problem is here :unsure:

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I have enjoyed three library caches. In all three the coordinates take you to the door of the library, and instructions on the cache page tell you how to go from there.

 

One is a hollow book as a final cache. The other two are hidden in the map drawers.

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...people answer a bunch of questions to obtain the coordinates for a library computer which they then go to...

Keep in mind that GPSrs don't work well in most buildings, so coordinates for a library computer might not be practical.

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...people answer a bunch of questions to obtain the coordinates for a library computer which they then go to...

Keep in mind that GPSrs don't work well in most buildings, so coordinates for a library computer might not be practical.

one at our local library is cool. The coordinates take you to a plaque in memory of the long time librarian. The logbook is filed on the shelf as a biography of her name. Very nice.

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I got an idea...does the library have a webcam in it? :ph34r:

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The only library cache I've come across gave coordinates that simply brought you to the front door of the library. In the description on the cache page was a Dewey Decimal number (just said "you'll need this" without saying what it was or how to use it...hopefully the cacher would recognize it and know what to do with it once they realized they were at a library). The DD number led to a blank, anonymous book that was the logbook.

 

A pretty simple one-stop cache, but it was the first one I'd come across and I thought it was pretty cool.

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There are a few library caches in my area. Here's the page for the first in the series - koobani

 

There are two methods for finding this cache. One is to go to the posted coordinates (the library front door) and from there you're led to various signage and plaques to get numbers to find the DD code.

 

Another way is to find a separate cache (not in the koobani series) that has the DD code posted inside.

 

The books themselves have cutouts with the log and trinkets inside. I definitely thought about Shawshank Redemption while finding these! An all-time great film by the way :)

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... my initial thought was to make it a multicache that starts outside the library, people answer a bunch of questions ... to determine the dewey decimal number of a book ...

 

While this all sounds great, the local reviewer has recently told me:

 

Please remember that you'll need to have GPS coordinates as part of this one: perhaps a starting point with the dewey decimal # of the book in it, and an approximate distance (or similar clue).

 

Seems to me you and the reviewer are saying exactly the same thing.

 

I fail to see what the problem is here :unsure:

 

Nope. Not the same at all. It's the method in which the cache is determined that makes all the difference - the reviewers suggestion implies that finding the book is done through a GPS offset, whilst my original idea was to make finders actually look for the Dewey Decimal # manually, which in my opinion is more library-like and more authentic. Small details matter immensely. :)

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Nope. Not the same at all. It's the method in which the cache is determined that makes all the difference - the reviewers suggestion implies that finding the book is done through a GPS offset, whilst my original idea was to make finders actually look for the Dewey Decimal # manually, which in my opinion is more library-like and more authentic. Small details matter immensely. :)

 

That's not how I interpret your reviewer's words.

 

Please remember that you'll need to have GPS coordinates as part of this one: perhaps a starting point with the dewey decimal # of the book in it, and an approximate distance (or similar clue).

 

To me that reads "a starting point that uses coordinates to find, and it will contain the dewey decimal # of the book in it." Which would be within the guidelines.

 

Maybe you should email your reviewer again for clarification.

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I will say the best library cache I have done is listed in the library computer with the cache owner's username as the author...THAT'S what I call 'with the co-operation of the library staff'. B)

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We have one of these here. The GPS takes you to the side of the library where you find the first stage which tells you where to go and find the cache. (Its a 2 stage.) Before you continue you might want to check with the Librarians about where they will place the cache in the library. Here its in a section that doesn't use the DD system but is arranged by Authors name. If they plan on doing that then the whole DD system goes out the window.

 

If they will add it into the DD system one way could be by placing parts of the DD number in several locations. Then the cacher has to figure out what order they go in. you could also use numbers off of the memorial plaques if any are present, to create the number. Course this would turn it into a puzzle cache....

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For the ones in my area, you have to solve a puzzle that tells you two things.

 

First, it will give you the coords for the library itself.

 

Second, it will also give you the location of the logbook inside the library.

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A workmate and I recently set up a cache in the library in which we work. It's a mystery cache with a waypoint outside the library which has a call number on it. The cache itself is a hollowed-out book shelved at that call number.

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Maybe you can contact CO for info:

 

GCT3BP A Few Good Books

A Kirkwood Highway Library Geocache GC3HX55

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I will say the best library cache I have done is listed in the library computer with the cache owner's username as the author...THAT'S what I call 'with the co-operation of the library staff'. B)

Got a GC Code? Is it still active? I want to add that to my "must do" list for next time I'm visiting my parents in AZ.

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Nope. Not the same at all. It's the method in which the cache is determined that makes all the difference - the reviewers suggestion implies that finding the book is done through a GPS offset, whilst my original idea was to make finders actually look for the Dewey Decimal # manually, which in my opinion is more library-like and more authentic. Small details matter immensely. :)

 

Here are a couple of examples that seem to be working out well and are similar to what I think you have in mind.

 

Take a look at this cache..

The posted coords take you to a Parking sign outside the Library door. On the sign post is a small label with the Dewey Decimal number (623.89). It's up to you to figure out what to do with it.

 

Also have a look at this one.

It is a three stage 'questios to answer' heritage tour to get the numbers for the final.

The offset at the final was required because of proximity issues and takes you to the Library front door.

Then you must find the Dewey Decimal number yourself to find the log book.

 

Both these cache finals are log book only - no other container.

 

51e5d277-1250-4444-8992-0ccfc963c6d8.jpg?rnd=0.5316845

f33f85f8-13b4-406f-af1a-0a6e77ffa6ca.jpg?rnd=0.6487783

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Why not what the reviewer suggested? Hide a container outside the library referenced by coordinates and put the Dewey Decimal number of the book inside the container.

+1, I have done two or three like that.

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I have done several library caches but this one is by far the best that I have ever seen. GC2P5PD in Prescott AZ. It has been found 58 times and has 51 favorite points.

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Sounds fun! I would think you could make it a mystery cache and do what you want with it as long as you give the best coords you can as the final location and the rest should be up to you on what you want to do with it. We found a traditional in a library in Kauai and the cords just lead you to the front door. Then it said to go inside past the front desk and it was a huge container sitting on the counter. I couldn't believe it when we seen it! Huge just sitting there. Kind of awkward to take it and open it up and trade TBs with everyone sitting around being quiet reading but no one seemed to mind.

-WarNinjas

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people answer a bunch of questions to obtain the coordinates for a library computer which they then go to, and there they do a few more calculations to determine the dewey decimal number of a book

 

We are currently working with one of our local libraries to place a cache there. Their rules, however, will not allow us to put an entry in the library computer for the cache, since it is not an actual book that can be loaned. We visited another cache in a nearby library whose coordinates led to the library door and the title of the cache was simply a string of numbers (which, of course, turned out to be the Dewey Decimal number assigned to the book/cache). It was only a blank journal-type log and was placed in the maps section of the library. You could also place it in "hobbies" or really a number of other places in the library and let your clues lead cachers there.

 

One suggestion: we also have done a "book/box," but found that most geocaching books in print are fairly thin. You need a substantial, hard-back TOME to make a good traditional cache. We ended up buying a big medical book from the library when they were cleaning house and used that-- along with a fake book jacket that we created. Note: make your book jacket first and put it on the book (including a plastic cover from the library) BEFORE you start creating the book/box. Once the pages are glued together and the center hollowed out, you will have a hard time adding the jacket.

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