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Need ideas


rock33
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Unless the property you are going to is tiny, you could probably do a live demo after your spoken presentation.

 

Make a typical "regular cache", complete with logbook, description page, etc - every thing a "real" cache would have.

 

Get permission to temporarily hide the cache on the property where the demo is to be given. You could hide it the day of the talk and remove it when your class finds it (emphasizing that normally you leave it there for the next person) If possible, place the cache a couple hundred yards away from where you will be talking, and in such a way that it can't be walked to in a straight line, like around the back of the building.

 

Before your talk pre-program the cache location as a goto waypoint on your GPSr and preprogram your starting point as a waypoint too.

 

Offer your "students" a chance to try it. They could go as a whole group, or take turns (provided they don't watch where the others before them go).

 

If you want, you could even expand this idea to be a multi, then several students could each take the GPSr for one leg.

 

As to the presentation proper, I'd just summarize a few points from one of the many "What is Geocaching" FAQs available. Personally, I would emphasize responsible land use, cache-in/trash-out, searching more creatively than just a straight-line bushwack, *fun*, family, low cost.

 

I wouldn't go into the how of GPS technology, except to briefly explain that the GPSr receives signals from several sattelites and that those multiple signals allow the receiver to "triangulate" a position on the earth.

 

migo_sig_logo.jpg

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I can't say that I could give any sugestions as to what to say preemptively especially without knowing what you plan to say or do. But if this presentation would be open to other cachers I am sure we could probably sit in. I would like to listen to other people's prespective of geocaching and I may be able to interject some of my own opinions. If there is to be an active hunt I can bring 2-3 receivers that the Friends of the parks can look at or use. I have a Mag 315 And a SporTrak map, and I can probably get another SporTrak map to bring along. Depending on what you want to do, and if more cachers or receivers could be any help, let me know as long as its on a weekend or an evening after 5 O'clock I am sure we can make it. Let us know.

 

Eeyore

 

I'm one sat short of triangulation.

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Print out a cache page of one site and make copies of it for people to follow along while you explain it.

 

There is another thread going in the "General" forum about making business size cards to give out explaining how the game works. passing these out for people to read and take home. (see "Encounter with the lawman") icon_eek.gif

 

Promote the "family fun" and "Cache In/Trash out" philosophies.

 

Make a slide show or photos of different GPS units from basic to advanced models explaining how they are used to find caches.

 

Use these forums for inspiration, and ask for help on things you don't understand. icon_biggrin.gif

 

I'm not Lost, my GPS says I'm right here....no over here......no over here.

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You might want to demonstrate the limitations of the GPS accuracy as most people would encounter in the field. Demonstrate how important it is to the GPS to have a clear view of the sky.

 

You might want to include things like signal degradation or complete loss of signals while under tree cover, under bridges, etc.

 

Demonstrate how the GPS "wanders" while standing still. You might explain the idea of waypoint averaging to get a more precise set of coordinates.

 

You might also show how you cannot use the GPS to determine a your current bearing or heading while standing still; explaining the currently displayed bearing is determined from your last position to your current position and the "wandering" while standing still makes the compass move around and be very unreliable.

 

You might show how the GPS computes a bearing between two points and while you are approaching the geocache, your current heading and the initially computed bearing will seldom be the same...

 

You might even include a compass and explain the differences between magnetic north and true north... ...you might even want to include a little bit about map reading and how you can use a map and the terrain to navigate with a compass when the GPS is poorly suited for use.

 

The GPS is a great tool for geocaching, but their limitations are important to understand, recognize, and respect while trying to find specific coordinates. Teaching those limits are important.

 

I assisted a high school geography teacher teaching the GPS and its limitiations by taking classes on field trips to plot grave positions in a local cemetery that had lots of trees...

 

Every one of the students were in awe of the GPS at first, later they felt better just plotting the locations where the GPS could not "see" the sky using basic geomery and using known locations.

 

Good Luck!

 

Pau

 

paul_stratton

And to think that I once had trouble finding my own "***" with both hands..

 

[This message was edited by paul_stratton on January 23, 2003 at 09:51 AM.]

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I am going to be doing an open to the public introduction to Geocaching seminar in a few months for the company I work for. On thing we will be doing after some geocahe searchs, will be to split the group into two, and have each group hide a geocahe for the other grup to find. We have been doing "introduction to Gps" seminars for years, this year we are replacing these with geocaching.

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quote:
Originally posted by GeoVet:

This thread has given me some great ideas for a summer school class I'm proposing. Need a grant to buy a bunch of GPSrs and there's some good stuff here. Thanks! icon_smile.gif


 

Having Just completed my introduction to geocaching seminar. It went rather well. I geared my seminar to GPS owners with in interest in Geocaching who had never tried it. With this format I did not need to supply a large quanity of GPSR. I had examplesof what a cache may look like. I also set up a series of 5 real caches in the area keeping them at least .10 miles apart, they are on the web sight. The regular cacher in the area have been hitting them also. I hid them the same way I have seen caches hidden. They all had copeis of the web page cache discriptions and I sent them out will the pages in different orders so that they would not be looking for the same cache at the same time. Most of them finished in about 1.5 hours, the course is around one mile. At the end we split them up into two groups each with a cache to hide form the other group.I plan on doing this seminar a few more times this year.

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quote:
Originally posted by GeoVet:

This thread has given me some great ideas for a summer school class I'm proposing. Need a grant to buy a bunch of GPSrs and there's some good stuff here. Thanks! icon_smile.gif


 

Having Just completed my introduction to geocaching seminar. It went rather well. I geared my seminar to GPS owners with in interest in Geocaching who had never tried it. With this format I did not need to supply a large quanity of GPSR. I had examplesof what a cache may look like. I also set up a series of 5 real caches in the area keeping them at least .10 miles apart, they are on the web sight. The regular cacher in the area have been hitting them also. I hid them the same way I have seen caches hidden. They all had copeis of the web page cache discriptions and I sent them out will the pages in different orders so that they would not be looking for the same cache at the same time. Most of them finished in about 1.5 hours, the course is around one mile. At the end we split them up into two groups each with a cache to hide form the other group.I plan on doing this seminar a few more times this year. icon_biggrin.gif

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