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How do I teach the Teachers?


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I've agreed to lead a field exercise for educators in the San Joaquin Valley (California)in February 2004, incorporating the use of handheld GPS units into State curriculum standards.

 

I found some great examples of caches & travelbugs that include math, science, history, and mapping in this forum topic.

 

Now I need a presentation/handout for the teachers explaining how this will help educators reach and teach students in an exciting way, while preparing them for those dreaded exams.

 

If you can help, please submit a message to the forum and/or email me through my profile.

 

Happy Caching icon_confused.gif!

 

You can't get there from here.

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In the workshops I've done in the past using the GPS, I like to use a couple of intro activities to get across how the GPSr uses the microwave signals to find the users location and to link the activities to student learning styles.

 

activity one is a simple paper & pencil exercise in which a grid sheet is used to find a specified spot on the sheet using a drawing compass (tactual learning).

 

activity two is the same activity only an actual point in a room/hallway/other open space is found by the students moving together to find the point of intersection of string segments (kinesthetic learning).

 

the after activity discussion can be interesting.

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I am a geography teacher in WA and I am going to set up a geocahing exercise for my students. Basically, I will set them off on a multistage cache and at each cache site they will have to look around and tell me how one of the Five Themes is represented in the area. Although they will technically have Location already, they should still be able to talk about Region, Movement, Human/environment interaction, and place.

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It is my understanding that you are asking how will you get teachers interested and excited about using gps in schools and how they will be beneficial to student learning. my answer is that students today are very computer-minded and i think that giving them a gadget is going to spark some interest. when teaching, i would give one gps to a group of several students which will give students the opportunity to work together socially. they can each be assigned roles in the group as well. one will be the recorder, another the presenter, and another the gps user. the actual lesson content can vary from physical education to science to social studies- any subject really. for example: the lesson can be focused on archiological finds or something- students have to report to a destination where they will find some artifacts left by the teacher and come up with a report about what they found there and how they think it might have gotten there. (other the it was put there by the teacher) in doing so they had to communicate, cooperate and were also involved in some level of physical activity (depending on where it was that they had to go to find the cache) then they could report about the terrain, group dynamics, and any number of things. to get the teachers buzzing i would give them a gps, a brief description of operation and send them on a hunt. hide some candy on campus somewhere outside in a box and send them out. the possibilities are endless- i hope that this helps grease your wheels. any questions just ask SC

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I'm very interested in your workshop. I am a teacher in Merced County and have been geocaching for about 2 months and am very intersted. I've discussed with administration about adding GPS, geocaching and orienteering as an elective for our Middle School. I'd appreciate any information you might have.

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That Intech site for Louisiana GPS lesson plans is amazing. Mr. Seavert's 6th grade social studies class in Wisconsin is great; reminds me of several geocaching teachers in California.

 

The University of California at Davis' Information Center for the Environment created an impressive introduction to GPS in August 2000. The curriculum was developed to encourse use of the Global Positioning System for the California Department of Health Services Drinking Water Source Assessment Protection Program.

 

Thanks for all of the good ideas. Now it's time to - as Nike so eloquently put it - Just Do It. <_<

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We not only do GPS and geocaching, we also show teachers how to download data from a unit and map it in a GIS application. It is fun to have students do multi geocaches, bring their units back and download their tracks. Then map each group to see how they really did.

 

We actually have a class called Have GPS Will Travel. Actually most teachers want to map the data so they take our GPS2GIS class. Then learn GPS and GIS and then map their data. I usually georeference a topo map for each school so they can also do the same project at their schools.

 

Ed

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