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History trip planning with gps


WildcatRegi
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Here's something I just did last weekend and I'll be trying it out next week at a national battlefield site in Virginia.

 

Most national battlefield sites will sell maps showing the positions of the units at different time periods.

 

In the case of Chancellorsville, there were 12 different maps.

 

I made a transperancy with alignment marks at specific road junctures. By placing this transparency on each map, I was able to come up with one document showing each individual position of the unit I was interested in (my gggrandfather's).

 

I used Topozone to find the coordinates of the road junctures I used as reference points.

 

Using the scale of the map to find the distance, a protractor to find the bearing, and the Excel add-ins that you can download from the Marine Mammal site, I came up with all the waypoints I need in order to trace the path of my gggrandfather's unit.

 

It seems to me this is an interesting technique to plan a meaningful field trip, combining research, a little geometry, a little map reading, and a little foot-work.

 

"The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"

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quote:
Originally posted by WildcatRegi:

Here's something I just did last weekend and I'll be trying it out next week at a national battlefield site in Virginia.

 

Most national battlefield sites will sell maps showing the positions of the units at different time periods.

 

In the case of http://www.nps.gov/frsp/cville.htm, there were 12 different maps.

 

I made a transperancy with alignment marks at specific road junctures. By placing this transparency on each map, I was able to come up with one document showing each individual position of the unit I was interested in (my gggrandfather's).

 

I used http://www.topozone.com/ to find the coordinates of the road junctures I used as reference points.

 

Using the scale of the map to find the distance, a protractor to find the bearing, and the http://nmml.afsc.noaa.gov/Software/ExcelGeoFunctions/excelgeofunc.htm that you can download from the Marine Mammal site, I came up with all the waypoints I need in order to trace the path of my gggrandfather's unit.

 

It seems to me this is an interesting technique to plan a meaningful field trip, combining research, a little geometry, a little map reading, and a little foot-work.

 

"The hardest thing to find is something that's not there!"


Wildcat: That's really cool. Your students are lucky to have you and you might consider publishing this story. It would be good for the public to read about a teacher that goes the xtra mile and is passionate enough to do this. You go!

 

If there is a pole at the North Pole, I bet there's some dead explorer guy with his tongue stuck to it.

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