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Does anyone else fo this


ToonAl
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Does anyone else do this? And then hold their breath hoping not to get bad press.

 

Right now in the Toronto Star are reporting a "strange pipe" attached to a lamppost a certain intersection. Sure enough a quick look on the map and there is a geocache at that intersection. Now I have not done it and don't know what it looks like so why am I imagining we are going to hear a "geocache blown up by the bomb squad" story?

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Been there, done that, got the T shirt. Well maybe not the T shirt part. I had a very successful cache just like that. Originally it was strapped to an abandoned telephone pole but the city came and too the pole away after two weeks. So I made a new one and strapped it to the side of a pole beside a bus stop at a major intersection.

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It'll be interesting to know if it really looked like a pipe bomb. The comments in the logs seemed to like the container.

"Good cache for muggles to not realize that it is a geocache."

"Very cool! So obvious it's easy to overlook. Nice Hide! TFTC"

 

You'd think that at least one person would voice concern if it looked like a pipe bomb.

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As I said to my cop buddy. Everything now is either a suspicious package or a potential bomb. But it is not like there have been bombing of random streets in the middle of west end Toronto. Or arguably anywhere in Canada. Yet it is the first thing people thing of now.

 

Here is what I am guessing we will see. Someone found it. Someone saw them signing the log and putting it back. That person calls in a potential bomb!!!!

 

And yes I know I am about to start a debate that will rage for days. Sorry Paul. :huh:

Edited by ToonAl
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It appears it may not be this cache.... if the news reports are listing the closers correctly.

 

"Both lanes of Prince Edward Dr. S. are closed to motor vehicle and pedestrian traffic from Kingslea Gdns. to Bloor St. W."

 

&

 

"Prince Edward is closed between Bloor and Kingslea Gardens" Kingslea is a few blocks south of Bloor.

 

The cache mentioned is north of Bloor and the GC map doesn't any directly south.

 

Time will tell though

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"More than two hours later, investigators determined the object posed no threat to the public and was left in the neighbourhood for a geocaching game."

 

They left it. Wow. I think this is a first.

 

Oh wait, maybe the reporter means the cache was placed in the neighbourhood for a geocaching game, not that the police left the container on the pole.

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am i reading this right? They spent 3h there, and didn't blow it up?

It's hard to say whether it was left in place or not. Someone needs to go by there and see if it's still there. I wouldn't think they would go through all that effort and then just leave it there. Practice makes perfect, even in bomb disposal! There have been many topics in these forums where the LEOs knew it was a cache, but still blew it up.

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As urban caching grows in popularity this will continue to be a problem for geocachers.

I don't see things changing anytime soon, particularly as the number of geocaches grows.

 

I'm waiting for the first power trail detonation when someone notices there's a film canister on a light post. And that one too. Oh my gosh there's another one. Wait ... ALL the light posts on the trail. Now THAT will make for an interesting bomb scare ....

 

Right now another [ tree | bush | mailbox ] gets blown up near a [ park | school | bridge | mall | bus shelter ] and it almost isn't news any more. Just another archival.

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As urban caching grows in popularity this will continue to be a problem for geocachers.

I don't see things changing anytime soon, particularly as the number of geocaches grows.

 

I'm waiting for the first power trail detonation when someone notices there's a film canister on a light post. And that one too. Oh my gosh there's another one. Wait ... ALL the light posts on the trail. Now THAT will make for an interesting bomb scare ....

 

Right now another [ tree | bush | mailbox ] gets blown up near a [ park | school | bridge | mall | bus shelter ] and it almost isn't news any more. Just another archival.

 

I was saying this to someone. I hate half the caches in the city. I am "acting strange" to people and then they see you place something back and we have a "suspicious object." Rather go for a long hike in the woods with the dog.

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I think that with some people they think "urban" caching means that it has to be in a conspicuous place. I have done several urban caches that are in discreet areas that allow you to take your time in finding the hide. They are only urban in their setting, but still discreet and still have a notion of allowing the finder so cover.

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Sometimes the Hide in Plain Sight is a great idea, but this probably didn't fit the bill.

 

Amazed they said they left it after examining it.

 

This wasn't as bad as it first sounded, before the link to the cache came out. It's a landscaped Island, what we could call a small park. I'm kind of surprised they left it there. Very likely one of the several homeowner's who live in view of the cache called it in. Keep in mind, the article refers to it as an "exclusive" neighborhood. Anyone street view it, and look at some of those houses? :lol: If a neighbor did in fact call it in, they're not going to like it's continued existence. I would have to think they're all aware of it now though, even if they weren't home at the time of the incident, word will get around. Maybe it will be fine. We will just have to wait and see. I know I just threw it on the watchlist. B)

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A few facts.

  • The cache was taken away by the police.
  • I had no idea that anyone would think it looked like a bomb when I placed it.
  • I am only a kid and coming home from school to find out what had happened was probably more frightening for me than the geocache ever was for anyone else.
  • The whole experience is enough to put me off geocaching.

To anyone who was inconvenience by this misunderstanding I am truly sorry.

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  • The whole experience is enough to put me off geocaching.

Harsh lesson, I know. But don't let it discourage you. There are still 1,752,069 other caches out there to find. Perhaps we need a little more due diligence from our Reviewers. Especially with first time hiders.

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Sorry your cache got blown up, kid. It's not the first one and I'm betting it won't be the last one.

 

Harsh lesson, I know. But don't let it discourage you. There are still 1,752,069 other caches out there to find. Perhaps we need a little more due diligence from our Reviewers. Especially with first time hiders.

 

How exactly is a reviewer supposed to know that a cache might be mistaken for a pipe bomb some time in the future?

 

 

 

B.

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Seems to me the police and bomb squad should make geocaching.com their first stop when there's a suspicious object siting before spending 3 hours wasting their time. And to the owner of this cache....please don't let it discourage you....whata story to tell the kids when u get older !

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  • The whole experience is enough to put me off geocaching.

Harsh lesson, I know. But don't let it discourage you. There are still 1,752,069 other caches out there to find. Perhaps we need a little more due diligence from our Reviewers. Especially with first time hiders.

Suppose we adopt your suggestion, and for every first time hider, the reviewer asks:

 

1. What container did you use, and is it labeled as a geocache?

2. Exactly how and where is the container hidden?

3. Who is the landowner/ land manager who gave you permission to place a cache here?

4. If you are under 18, was your placement supervised by a parent or guardian as required by Section 3, paragraph 5 of Groundspeak's terms of use?

etc etc etc

 

This level of scrutiny will lead to two results:

(1) The cache owner will say "the whole experience is enough to put me off geocaching."

(2) The cache reviewers will demand to be compensated for their time, since the daily review work will take longer than a volunteer is willing to contribute. (Especially Cache Shadow, who is easily excited.)

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A few facts.

  • The cache was taken away by the police.
  • I had no idea that anyone would think it looked like a bomb when I placed it.
  • I am only a kid and coming home from school to find out what had happened was probably more frightening for me than the geocache ever was for anyone else.
  • The whole experience is enough to put me off geocaching.

To anyone who was inconvenience by this misunderstanding I am truly sorry.

 

According to this CBC link the police detonated the package some strange reporting on this one for sure. http://www.cbc.ca/news/offbeat/story/2012/05/10/pipe-bomb-scare-geocaching.html

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A few facts.

  • The cache was taken away by the police.
  • I had no idea that anyone would think it looked like a bomb when I placed it.
  • I am only a kid and coming home from school to find out what had happened was probably more frightening for me than the geocache ever was for anyone else.
  • The whole experience is enough to put me off geocaching.

To anyone who was inconvenience by this misunderstanding I am truly sorry.

 

Can we ask what you used for a container?

 

Sometimes people will over-react (I doubt anyone would think a nano is dangerous), and other times the reaction is warranted - there was one photo in the forums of a cache that was made from black iron pipe, complete with screw on caps and a wire to hang it with.

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  • The whole experience is enough to put me off geocaching.

Harsh lesson, I know. But don't let it discourage you. There are still 1,752,069 other caches out there to find. Perhaps we need a little more due diligence from our Reviewers. Especially with first time hiders.

Suppose we adopt your suggestion, and for every first time hider, the reviewer asks:

4. If you are under 18, was your placement supervised by a parent or guardian as required by Section 3, paragraph 5 of Groundspeak's terms of use?

etc etc etc

 

I think #4 should be included in the submission form.

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A few facts.

  • The cache was taken away by the police.
  • I had no idea that anyone would think it looked like a bomb when I placed it.
  • I am only a kid and coming home from school to find out what had happened was probably more frightening for me than the geocache ever was for anyone else.
  • The whole experience is enough to put me off geocaching.

To anyone who was inconvenience by this misunderstanding I am truly sorry.

 

According to this CBC link the police detonated the package some strange reporting on this one for sure. http://www.cbc.ca/news/offbeat/story/2012/05/10/pipe-bomb-scare-geocaching.html

 

Yeah, the media are still trying to get their story straight, blown-up, they left it there, taken away? The cache owner has been here him/herself, and said they took it away.

 

I don't know, I just live by the credo never in view of someone's (or multiple persons) house(s). I mean look at it from the perspective of a non-Geocacher homeowner. You're living in your house in your neighborhood for 10, 15, 25 years, and all of a sudden, one day, out of nowhere, a bunch of strangers converge on the neighborhood, and start snooping around in the bushes on the landscaped Island.

Edited by Mr.Yuck
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I think someones going to get a nice bill in the mail soon. <_<

 

Why would you say that?

 

There has been no documented incident where a cache owner has received a bill from a bomb squad for "removing" a cache container.

 

.

 

True. The placer is a teen, has posted here, and is a little shaken by the incident. Don't scare them like that! The article says no charges will be filed.

 

As they never are. However, I may or may not argue with Tequila that a guy in Waco, Texas got fined for a parking lot LPC that was blown up a few years ago. But I'd have to look all that nonsense up, and the fines could have been dropped.

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I think someones going to get a nice bill in the mail soon. <_<

 

Why would you say that?

 

There has been no documented incident where a cache owner has received a bill from a bomb squad for "removing" a cache container.

 

.

 

True. The placer is a teen, has posted here, and is a little shaken by the incident. Don't scare them like that! The article says no charges will be filed.

 

As they never are. However, I may or may not argue with Tequila that a guy in Waco, Texas got fined for a parking lot LPC that was blown up a few years ago. But I'd have to look all that nonsense up, and the fines could have been dropped.

 

I was quite impressed with the owner's post in this thread. He explained the situation and apologized for an innocent mistake. There is no need to make him feel any worse than he already does.

 

I hope he learns from this and continues to enjoy caching.

 

As for the guy in Waco, doesn't Texas march to its own drummer? ;)

.

Edited by Tequila
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A few facts.

  • The cache was taken away by the police.
  • I had no idea that anyone would think it looked like a bomb when I placed it.
  • I am only a kid and coming home from school to find out what had happened was probably more frightening for me than the geocache ever was for anyone else.
  • The whole experience is enough to put me off geocaching.

To anyone who was inconvenience by this misunderstanding I am truly sorry.

I was alerted to this incident by a fellow geocacher and was saddened to hear of your cache's demise. I enjoyed finding it. Bang-on co-ords, great location, and a very clever container made it a lot of fun for me. Okay, maybe a better choice of container for your next cache will cause less of a stir but the point is, don't give up. You have a gift for creating inventive, clever caches...just what us geocachers crave. Take a bit of a break to catch your breath but start working on your next cache. Once it's published, I'll be one of the first to go after it.

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A few facts.

  • The cache was taken away by the police.
  • I had no idea that anyone would think it looked like a bomb when I placed it.
  • I am only a kid and coming home from school to find out what had happened was probably more frightening for me than the geocache ever was for anyone else.
  • The whole experience is enough to put me off geocaching.

To anyone who was inconvenience by this misunderstanding I am truly sorry.

I was alerted to this incident by a fellow geocacher and was saddened to hear of your cache's demise. I enjoyed finding it. Bang-on co-ords, great location, and a very clever container made it a lot of fun for me. Okay, maybe a better choice of container for your next cache will cause less of a stir but the point is, don't give up. You have a gift for creating inventive, clever caches...just what us geocachers crave. Take a bit of a break to catch your breath but start working on your next cache. Once it's published, I'll be one of the first to go after it.

 

I wondered about the cache container since there were so many positive comments about it in the logs. How was it disguised? The Toronto Sun reports that "The package was noticed by a Toronto City Works department employee."

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I think someones going to get a nice bill in the mail soon. <_<

 

Why would you say that?

 

There has been no documented incident where a cache owner has received a bill from a bomb squad for "removing" a cache container.

 

.

 

True. The placer is a teen, has posted here, and is a little shaken by the incident. Don't scare them like that! The article says no charges will be filed.

 

As they never are. However, I may or may not argue with Tequila that a guy in Waco, Texas got fined for a parking lot LPC that was blown up a few years ago. But I'd have to look all that nonsense up, and the fines could have been dropped.

 

I was quite impressed with the owner's post in this thread. He explained the situation and apologized for an innocent mistake. There is no need to make him feel any worse than he already does.

 

I hope he learns from this and continues to enjoy caching.

 

As for the guy in Waco, doesn't Texas march to its own drummer? ;)

.

 

They certainly do. Especially Waco. :unsure:

 

 

I was alerted to this incident by a fellow geocacher and was saddened to hear of your cache's demise. I enjoyed finding it. Bang-on co-ords, great location, and a very clever container made it a lot of fun for me.

 

Let's not get carried away and say great location. A residential neighborhood in full view of several houses is a horrible location for a Geocache, in my opinion.

 

But the Cache owner can take solace in the 24 (as of now) comments to the Toronto Sun Online Article Many were obviously written by Geocachers. If I had to sum them up, they all basically say "stupid cops". :laughing:

 

For the record, bomb squads, no matter where in the U.S. or Canada are not "sitting around, doing nothing" as so many of the comments reference. It is an assigned duty that requires many hours of extra training, and the members of the squad are pulled away from whatever they were doing, or called in if it's off their shift.

Edited by Mr.Yuck
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This is the CO's father. I felt I should write and give a little more information about what happened here.

 

The CO has just turned twelve years old, he and a few of his friends became interesting in geocaching over the last few months and it seemed like a harmless healthy outdoor activity. Between them they have found a number of local caches and hidden a few. Of the ones they have hidden, one has been removed by persons unknown, one has been filled with dog poo by some kind individual and now one has been shot at and removed by the bomb squad. All quite discouraging, the latest incident has left a child very shaken and for a time worried that he would be arrested.

 

I was fully aware of the "Urban Island" cache that has caused so much trouble. I knew where it was placed and what it looked like and it never for one moment occured to me that anyone would mistake it for a bomb. The cache was attached to a lamp post on a quiet suburban street, not close to an airport, subway or busy public area that might be the subject of a terrorist attack and I am still at a loss to understand how it was mistaken for a bomb. The cache was not labelled on the outside as a geocache, the whole point of the hide was that it was in plain sight and intended to be something that did not draw attention to itself. The cache was in place for several weeks before anything went wrong and the CO was pleased with the comments that were being logged by people who found it. All harmless fun - or so I thought.

 

There are diverse opinions being expressed about whether this was a "great location" or a "horrible location" for a Geocache, these are just opinions and people are entitled to their own. I will not enter into that debate. What I will say is that when you are twelve years old an live in an urban environment, you cannot jump in a car and drive to the wilderness, you have to make your own fun where you live. If there were no urban caches, geocaching would be something that you could only do with an adult to take you out of the city.

 

With regard to the waste of police time and resources, that is obviously deeply regretable, along with the disruption caused to people living in the neighbourhood. The fact that no harm was intended does not lessen the impact of that disruption. I wish to add my apologies to those my son has already expressed.

 

I have spent some time reading about other similar incidents where geocaches have been mistaken for bombs and the conclusion I have reached is that no matter how carefully or thoughtfully placed a geocache is, it is impossible to be certain there will not be a misunderstanding leading to a lot of wasted police time and resources. To me it is a sad reflection on our paranoid society, but it seems to be an inescapable fact. Sadly there will be no more geocaching here for fear of further unintended consequences.

 

Sorry for the inconvenience to all involved.

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This is the CO's father. I felt I should write and give a little more information about what happened here.

 

The CO has just turned twelve years old, he and a few of his friends became interesting in geocaching over the last few months and it seemed like a harmless healthy outdoor activity. Between them they have found a number of local caches and hidden a few. Of the ones they have hidden, one has been removed by persons unknown, one has been filled with dog poo by some kind individual and now one has been shot at and removed by the bomb squad. All quite discouraging, the latest incident has left a child very shaken and for a time worried that he would be arrested.

 

I was fully aware of the "Urban Island" cache that has caused so much trouble. I knew where it was placed and what it looked like and it never for one moment occured to me that anyone would mistake it for a bomb. The cache was attached to a lamp post on a quiet suburban street, not close to an airport, subway or busy public area that might be the subject of a terrorist attack and I am still at a loss to understand how it was mistaken for a bomb. The cache was not labelled on the outside as a geocache, the whole point of the hide was that it was in plain sight and intended to be something that did not draw attention to itself. The cache was in place for several weeks before anything went wrong and the CO was pleased with the comments that were being logged by people who found it. All harmless fun - or so I thought.

 

There are diverse opinions being expressed about whether this was a "great location" or a "horrible location" for a Geocache, these are just opinions and people are entitled to their own. I will not enter into that debate. What I will say is that when you are twelve years old an live in an urban environment, you cannot jump in a car and drive to the wilderness, you have to make your own fun where you live. If there were no urban caches, geocaching would be something that you could only do with an adult to take you out of the city.

 

With regard to the waste of police time and resources, that is obviously deeply regretable, along with the disruption caused to people living in the neighbourhood. The fact that no harm was intended does not lessen the impact of that disruption. I wish to add my apologies to those my son has already expressed.

 

I have spent some time reading about other similar incidents where geocaches have been mistaken for bombs and the conclusion I have reached is that no matter how carefully or thoughtfully placed a geocache is, it is impossible to be certain there will not be a misunderstanding leading to a lot of wasted police time and resources. To me it is a sad reflection on our paranoid society, but it seems to be an inescapable fact. Sadly there will be no more geocaching here for fear of further unintended consequences.

 

Sorry for the inconvenience to all involved.

 

Kudos for coming to the boards and giving us a fuller picture of the circumstances. It's also reassuring to know that your son was supervised and has an understanding parent who can help him through this unfortunate event.

 

Urban cache ownership has greater risks. People (in this case a city employee) probably feel more at risk of terrorist attacks in big metropolitan communities.

 

There's a lot to be learned from dbrierley's bad ideas, bomb scare bookmark list. Most of the bomb squad reported caches are urban caches (not seeing any forest caches being blown up by the police).

 

If you and your son decide to "get back on the saddle" and give it another try, you might want to consider local nearby wooded areas in parks like Kings Mill Park or Home Smith Park. And perhaps hide a clear container so that anyone stumbling upon can see the contents.

Edited by L0ne R
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I am sorry this happened to the poor young cacher and hopefully he'll get back up on the horse again.

 

I rely on urban caches because most of the time I'm on transit looking (don't drive.) My husband has taken me to some a little harder to get to areas. One of the reasons I started was for the exercise of walking. So thanks to the urban hiders.

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Thank you for this post - so often we work ourselves up with conjecture. It is refreshing to have an actual "side of the story".

 

I would say that suburban cache placements aren't "bad" or "good" but difficult. In the city proper people tend to be so busy they hardly notice you groping the back of the newspaper box. In the woods, you may not see another person all day. However, in the suburban in between - where people are suspicious and territorial - you run into far more problems with muggles.

 

I truly hope your son will not have a permanent dislike for geocaching, but I understand that it might be a good idea to take a break for a few years. When he is seventeen and has a little more unsupervised range ;) maybe you could both come back to it - go on a road trip and pick up a few caching experiences along the way. We'll be here waiting :)

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This is the CO's father. I felt I should write and give a little more information about what happened here.

 

The CO has just turned twelve years old, he and a few of his friends became interesting in geocaching over the last few months and it seemed like a harmless healthy outdoor activity. Between them they have found a number of local caches and hidden a few. Of the ones they have hidden, one has been removed by persons unknown, one has been filled with dog poo by some kind individual and now one has been shot at and removed by the bomb squad. All quite discouraging, the latest incident has left a child very shaken and for a time worried that he would be arrested.

 

I was fully aware of the "Urban Island" cache that has caused so much trouble. I knew where it was placed and what it looked like and it never for one moment occured to me that anyone would mistake it for a bomb. The cache was attached to a lamp post on a quiet suburban street, not close to an airport, subway or busy public area that might be the subject of a terrorist attack and I am still at a loss to understand how it was mistaken for a bomb. The cache was not labelled on the outside as a geocache, the whole point of the hide was that it was in plain sight and intended to be something that did not draw attention to itself. The cache was in place for several weeks before anything went wrong and the CO was pleased with the comments that were being logged by people who found it. All harmless fun - or so I thought.

 

There are diverse opinions being expressed about whether this was a "great location" or a "horrible location" for a Geocache, these are just opinions and people are entitled to their own. I will not enter into that debate. What I will say is that when you are twelve years old an live in an urban environment, you cannot jump in a car and drive to the wilderness, you have to make your own fun where you live. If there were no urban caches, geocaching would be something that you could only do with an adult to take you out of the city.

 

With regard to the waste of police time and resources, that is obviously deeply regretable, along with the disruption caused to people living in the neighbourhood. The fact that no harm was intended does not lessen the impact of that disruption. I wish to add my apologies to those my son has already expressed.

 

I have spent some time reading about other similar incidents where geocaches have been mistaken for bombs and the conclusion I have reached is that no matter how carefully or thoughtfully placed a geocache is, it is impossible to be certain there will not be a misunderstanding leading to a lot of wasted police time and resources. To me it is a sad reflection on our paranoid society, but it seems to be an inescapable fact. Sadly there will be no more geocaching here for fear of further unintended consequences.

 

Sorry for the inconvenience to all involved.

 

Thank you for coming here, and your heartfelt post. Now you say you won't enter the debate on "great location" or "horrible location", but I'm the guy who made the horrible location comment, and I can tell you're offended. I apologize for this profusely. I'm actually an American from Buffalo, but I do have to say, the entire length of the Credit River in Mississauga is a Greenway, and it's more than woodsy enough for a wilderness Geocaching experience. I've hiked several miles Kilometers along it (see, I told you I was American), and have found about 20 caches. I have not been along it, but there is also a Greenway along the Humber River in Toronto, pretty close to where the cache was. I have to assume these two Greenways are very similar. Again, I apologize if you were offended, but I do have to dispute that a child in The GTA would have to be driven "out in the wilderness" :)

 

I'm so sorry what happened to his friend's caches, as well as his. Vandalism if a fact of life for our urban caches, especially the larger ones that contain trading items. There have been two "poop" incidents within a couple miles of my house in Suburban Buffalo, and I believe they were human in Nature. Man, why did I have to bring that up?

 

I'm going to bet there have been a couple hundred bomb squad incidents in the U.S. and Canada since Geocaching began, and the next person who thinks their cache looked like a bomb will be the first!! They make the local news every single time, so nothing unusual there. We are leaving "packages" ouside, and C4 Explosives could be put into just about anything. I'm aware of at least two film Canisters that have been blown up by Bomb Squads, one of them in Jamestown, NY. Now yes, of course I see what you're saying. An Island in a somewhat upscale Toronto neighborhood? Who would think there would ever be an issue there.

 

Thank you very much for supervising him, you're a good parent. I have a 12 year old son myself, I hope I'm doing as good of a job supervising him in all his endeavors. We certainly see plenty of children and teens (I'll throw teens a bone, and not call them children), who most certainly are not supervised, placing caches. Tell him urban caches are highly susceptable to vandalism, and being blown up (although it's obviously much more rare), and not to get frustrated.

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