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Do people not care about swag items?


Bloodheart
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Newbie - since 02/10/2012, 83 caches found.

 

I've seen several posts on the forums here complaining about swag quality - why does the swag suffer so much? It's not the most important thing about geocaching but certainly it's one aspect that makes the game fun and I like to have a little keep-sake of the day, but there's so much junk! My swag includes heart key-rings as a 'signature item' and other cheap items like rubbers, party favours, bubbles, or little plastic toys I've got laying round the house from Kinder eggs that I may leave too...but what I'm seeing in caches are rusty pennies, rusty used hair slide, salt packets, rubbish.

 

I like leaving nice swag items for the same reason I like to do a little light maintenance on caches - to keep the game fun and pleasant for everyone - I'd hope it would also rise the quality of swag items locally, or at least be a nice surprise for a kid out geocaching with their family. I'm starting to feel stupid for leaving these items when no one else bothers and then I re-visited a cache today to find my items still there, I suspect either people had nothing of equal value to trade or just don't like to trade...but then, why am I bothering? Should I not bother? Do people just not care about swag items?

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why am I bothering? Should I not bother? Do people just not care about swag items?

For me, it depends on the cache. Some are known and regularly raided by passers-by. If I suspect that's happening, I remove trash (paper or wrappers) and add nothing. If it's a little-visited cache that has merely degraded over time, I may add a nice item or two. Some didn't start with any swag to speak of. If I've greatly increased the value of the contents with a couple of cheap items, I also place one or two of my laminated cards that explain a concept of Geocaching (such as how to manage Trackables).

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Newbie - since 02/10/2012, 83 caches found.

 

I've seen several posts on the forums here complaining about swag quality - why does the swag suffer so much? It's not the most important thing about geocaching but certainly it's one aspect that makes the game fun and I like to have a little keep-sake of the day, but there's so much junk! My swag includes heart key-rings as a 'signature item' and other cheap items like rubbers, party favours, bubbles, or little plastic toys I've got laying round the house from Kinder eggs that I may leave too...but what I'm seeing in caches are rusty pennies, rusty used hair slide, salt packets, rubbish.

 

I like leaving nice swag items for the same reason I like to do a little light maintenance on caches - to keep the game fun and pleasant for everyone - I'd hope it would also rise the quality of swag items locally, or at least be a nice surprise for a kid out geocaching with their family. I'm starting to feel stupid for leaving these items when no one else bothers and then I re-visited a cache today to find my items still there, I suspect either people had nothing of equal value to trade or just don't like to trade...but then, why am I bothering? Should I not bother? Do people just not care about swag items?

 

1. Having good swag items takes preparation. Not a lot of preparation - but some, and possibly a small personal investment. Many are cheap and selfish.

2. Many people think their possessions are made of solid gold, even the trash, and that everyone else's are solid <bleep>.

3. Everyone says trade even, or trade up, but really, how do you know you've done that? Sure, taking something nice and leaving a penny is obviously selfish - unless it turns out that it's kind of a rare unique penny, and you haven't ID'd it correctly. (We'll assume there are no really valuable salt packets... ;))

 

But even if you are trying to be fair, how do you evaluate the value of a trade?

 

I'll give you an example. I took a small rubber duckie out of a cache for some reason. It was actually a very well stocked cache. I don't know why I took it - I think it is destined to be a travel bug. Anyway, I left two LED keychain lights. I bought these lights for about $1 each. They are pretty nice I think, at least as long as the battery doesn't degrade until they don't light up. Hopefully someone will take one and use it. Did I trade up or down? I have no idea. If nobody takes one of the keychains for a few years until the batteries are worthless, then they are worth $0. (You could replace the battery - but it is probably cheaper to just get another keychain light.) But I dunno, maybe this stupid little duck is worth $5 and I ripped off the cache owner. How would I know?

 

 

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1. I care but I am also fully aware that many don't.

 

2. I always trade up but only for kids. I figure adults can go buy their own junk.

 

3. If you are an adult and want to leave something for adults, signature items are the best.

Pretty much my thoughts as well. I enjoy sitting down with an old ammo can, reading the logbook page by page and trying to match up the remaining swag with the visitors of caching past. Unless I see something my daughter would like, I'll rarely trade, though I do make a habit of leaving a signature item in every cache they'll fit in. These items range from a mini baggie with a few antique foreign coins, a handmade geocaching keychain or a small, round, metal, personalized disk with a hole in it. (rhymes with mathgags)

 

One thing I've witnessed many times is a phenomenon I like to call "Swag Karma", in which someone with no handy trade items takes a desired item from a cache, expressing something to the effect of, "I'll leave two things in the next cache I find to balance taking this one item", or, "I've left so much swag in other caches without taking anything that I deserve this item". Whilst that might effectively balance their personal swag karma, (assuming they actually follow through), it does nothing for the cache they just took something from.

 

I've also noticed that, contrary to what I've read in these forums, swag degradation is not a universal problem. There seems to be a formula in play that states "The speed in which swag degrades is in inverse proportion to the number of calories required to reach the cache". This is something you can actually test for yourself by stocking two ammo cans with identical swag. Hide one about 5' from parking, and the other about 5000' from parking, then inventory each cache after every 5 visits. The cache closest to parking will degrade at a disproportionate rate to the cache that requires a lengthy hike. It seems that those folks most attracted to P&Gs are more likely to utilize unfair trading practices. If the difficult cache is challenging enough to earn word of mouth recommendations, you might even find that the overall swag value increases over time, as many folks who are attracted to the type of cache that takes all day to acquire often bring some unique swag item to leave as a memento of their visit.

 

On a separate note, I would like to ask, nay, beg, that you cease and desist leaving bubble liquid.

 

I've had way too many caches ruined by that stuff.

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My swag includes ... bubbles,

 

I've had the contents of 3 ammo can caches ruined by "bubbles" and the one can itself rusted through because of the "bubbles" liquid. Please don't leave any liquids in a cache, ever.

 

Generally agreeing with Clan Riffster, above me. The closer to the road, the faster the swag degrades - the further out, the slower, or if a cache is "epic" the swag improves over time.

 

I never stock for children, I swag with "real" items of interest to adults. Most of my ammo cans will start with a small lock and lock, a matchsafe, a bungee coord or two, a small nylon pouch that I make (my sig item), and a log book. The lock and lock goes first just about 100% of the time. Over time, the swag on a cache that requires 3 miles or more of walking will do okay.

Under that, it's junk by the time it's been found 6 times.

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My husband and I don't trade or care about the swag.....

 

Caches of my own...I'll put decent swag in it for adults & kids.

 

jholly summed it up nicely. All I ask is a dry & maintained log book (and cache).

 

If I want 'stuff', I'll buy my own stuff. The hobby is about the 'hunt', not the stuff inside.

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I like stocking swag for kids and adults as well, but mostly for the mini-cachers. The adults do not generally seem to care about the swag, as long as it's a)there b)in good shape) c)dry. Even adults still seem to get that pang of disappointment when we find an empty cache. The adults who do care about the swag are not above having a collection of plastic army men. lol. To me it seems as if the adult ratio for happy caching is roughly 90% the hunt, 10% swag. For kids the ratio is reversed, they hunt to find the swag. I try to reflect this in my swag.

 

Isonzo said "Over time, the swag on a cache that requires 3 miles or more of walking will do okay.

Under that, it's junk by the time it's been found 6 times. "

 

For me this is both true and untrue. It's true because it's exactly what I find in the world. It's untrue for me though because it's the cache owners responsibility to make it untrue. Maintain your caches people.

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1. I care but I am also fully aware that many don't.

 

2. I always trade up but only for kids. I figure adults can go buy their own junk.

 

3. If you are an adult and want to leave something for adults, signature items are the best.

Pretty much my thoughts as well. I enjoy sitting down with an old ammo can, reading the logbook page by page and trying to match up the remaining swag with the visitors of caching past. Unless I see something my daughter would like, I'll rarely trade, though I do make a habit of leaving a signature item in every cache they'll fit in. These items range from a mini baggie with a few antique foreign coins, a handmade geocaching keychain or a small, round, metal, personalized disk with a hole in it. (rhymes with mathgags)

 

One thing I've witnessed many times is a phenomenon I like to call "Swag Karma", in which someone with no handy trade items takes a desired item from a cache, expressing something to the effect of, "I'll leave two things in the next cache I find to balance taking this one item", or, "I've left so much swag in other caches without taking anything that I deserve this item". Whilst that might effectively balance their personal swag karma, (assuming they actually follow through), it does nothing for the cache they just took something from.

 

I've also noticed that, contrary to what I've read in these forums, swag degradation is not a universal problem. There seems to be a formula in play that states "The speed in which swag degrades is in inverse proportion to the number of calories required to reach the cache". This is something you can actually test for yourself by stocking two ammo cans with identical swag. Hide one about 5' from parking, and the other about 5000' from parking, then inventory each cache after every 5 visits. The cache closest to parking will degrade at a disproportionate rate to the cache that requires a lengthy hike. It seems that those folks most attracted to P&Gs are more likely to utilize unfair trading practices. If the difficult cache is challenging enough to earn word of mouth recommendations, you might even find that the overall swag value increases over time, as many folks who are attracted to the type of cache that takes all day to acquire often bring some unique swag item to leave as a memento of their visit.

 

On a separate note, I would like to ask, nay, beg, that you cease and desist leaving bubble liquid.

 

I've had way too many caches ruined by that stuff.

 

I agree with all including NEVER add liquid trade items.

I will add that the parking lot ammo can is going to suffer from sheer numbers , many of which will not go after the long hike......in general, the more visits the more problems. Many of the EXTRA parking lot can visitors will be newbie smart phone TFTC logging TB mishandling cachers so you know the swag is going to suffer.

 

Also swag down-trading seems to be related to human nature.....its just the way it is.

 

I doubt if my wife and I make a trade once a year....at times we'll remove an item or two from a cache where you can't get the lid closed and put them in another cache ( or give them to the owner )

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Isonzo said "Over time, the swag on a cache that requires 3 miles or more of walking will do okay.

Under that, it's junk by the time it's been found 6 times. "

 

For me this is both true and untrue. It's true because it's exactly what I find in the world. It's untrue for me though because it's the cache owners responsibility to make it untrue. Maintain your caches people.

 

Sorry, but maintenance of hides and swag condition are two different things.

When/if our hides require maintenance we'll bring some new swag to fill it a bit. We won't however, visit any hide to see how much swag is left, or what condition swag is in until then.

We maintain our caches.

When you have more than one hide, you might understand the difference.

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Isonzo said "Over time, the swag on a cache that requires 3 miles or more of walking will do okay.

Under that, it's junk by the time it's been found 6 times. "

 

For me this is both true and untrue. It's true because it's exactly what I find in the world. It's untrue for me though because it's the cache owners responsibility to make it untrue. Maintain your caches people.

 

No, keeping up the swag in caches I place is not a maintenance responsibility. Dry container, with logbook, on the coords is. Swag is what happens.

 

I'm not planning to go out and restock with locks and locks and matchsafes in my containers over and over and over.

 

A few years back I bought a bunch of FGA geocoins, and left them, unactivated, in caches. Not my own, just caches I visited. These $10 swag items were taken without trade 100% of the time. I figured it would go like that, but was curious about it. Apparently if a swag item has something over a $1 perceived value, the expectation of finders is that no one seriously expect it to be traded for - it can just be taken. Same applies to the small lock and locks I leave. They're never traded for, just taken.

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It's not my job to continually buy free gifts for people. I stock my cache initially with swag and may go back and put more stuff in it as I desire but I in no way feel it's a part of cache maintenance to continually fill it with stuff for people to take. That's a complete waste of money.

 

That being said when I'm out caching and if I find a decent cache that is hurting for swag I will sometimes dip into my swag bag and put some stuff in there even if I don't take anything. I also don't feel obligated to do that either but sometimes I like to.

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Most caches put out nowadays in my area aren't large enough to hold swag, they are mostly all micros.

 

Agree.. the growth of micros and the demise of good swag have gone hand in hand. I've become so used to micros and very small containers that I often forget to carry anything with me even when I have a loop of regular caches planned for the day.

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Most hides I go for are higher terrain or difficuly accessing.

I'll usually carry things that folks who'll go after those hides might like or need. A spare low-end 'biner on a rope run is a Godsend.

Backpackers TP is the one thing never discussed, but most grabbed from hides I drop mini rolls in. :laughing:

Received mails where a ponchos, led lights, or batteries for flashlight/GPSr saved their bacon.

My other 2/3rds hits more 1-2 terrains, so she'll usually have the kid stuff with her. We've gone a bit cheaper with those hides, as they most lately tend to have poor quality swag to begin with.

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A dry logbook is all I ask. Maybe an interesting sig item. Maybe a traveler. Lots of swag gets in the way of finding the logbook or the travelers.

Same with me. I picked up and archived 2- 30cal box's yesterday. To begin with I stocked them with better quality stuff from the $ store. Decks of cards, small tools, tape measures, crayons, toy cars ect. I ended up with,, ripped pieces of paper and plastic broken pencils and broken crayons business cards and a very large piece of blue cloth :blink: I can reuse maybe 5 items. It is what it is :sad: I almost never trade any more just like a dry log book and to keep bugs moving

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I don't generally care about swag, I rarely trade items. I will leave things, though... Lately it's been Brazilian coins that I've still got from my trip down there.

 

It is more visually appealing when the cache has got good swag, though, I'll admit that. Even if I'm not into trading, it makes me feel like the cache is in better shape.

 

My own caches are another story; I try to load them up with good swag.

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When I first started caching, about two years ago, finding and trading swag was a fun aspect to my new hobby, especially as I usually had my 10 year-old daughter with me.

 

Now that I'm more seasoned, I've found that what I really like are 1) finding a way to get to the cache without bushwhacking, and 2) finding the cache. I now have zero interest in swag, perhaps in part since the swag I've seen is very low quality.

 

Reading the thread so far, it makes a lot of sense that younger cachers would have fun with swag, but us older cachers much less so.

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I like swag. I like looking in the cache and seeing if there is anything interesting. Surprise me. I like bringing home my little keepsakes and displaying them where everyone else looks to see what I found today. They are my trophies for finding the cache. When I'm done looking at them they'll probably go back in another cache for someone else to find. I like loading up caches with swag. I like that the next person is in for a surprise- I hope. I scour the clearance aisles for stuff. Nothing expensive. It might not be more than a few stickers or fancy pencils or even a toy from the cereal box, but it's often better than what I find in the cache and I know some kid will be happy finding it. I look for sturdy stuff that can take a licking when it gets knocked about by people searching through the container. I like sticking something really cool in a cache once in a while and reading the log of the person who found it.

Dirt is the enemy. I'm starting to wrap my swag up in plastic wrap or small bags to keep it clean. An awful lot of good swag gets CITOed by me simply becase it got too dirty.

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The best piece of swag we ever found was a small think of tissues sealed up. You see, the girlfriend *really* had to go, and we bought nothing with us.

Thimbleberry = nature's toilet paper (big, soft, fuzzy leaves). Actually, in a pinch, almost any good-sized leaf will do. :grin:

 

As for swag...I don't trade anymore. I do stock my new caches with swag I get at Goodwill and Dollar Tree. Amazing what you can find there. And yes, it degrades over time, esp. when the FTF swaps a TB for a calculator. <_<

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...and other cheap items like rubbers...

 

Can I just say how much I love regional language differences? When I first read this, I was a bit shocked that someone would leave a condom in a cache... and a cheap one at that! :yikes:

 

I sometimes play the swag game, but not much - mostly when the kids are along. They're seven and four, so that aspect of the game appeals to them. I do have a small bag with a few cool items I've traded for, though. It's a sometimes entertaining side-activity, to me.

Edited by ScooterDawg
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Great topic! Sadly, the ones who trade down are also the ones who will never be in here reading this (or any other) thread.

 

I, too, am a newbie though... and while I don't TAKE swag unless I have my granddaughter with me - then she takes, and I replace -- but I always try to leave a little something. Of course, you can't leave anything in the micros... but I have little tiny things even for the metal key boxes! Stickers! I like to leave things for the kids... I don't think a lot of adults do really care about the swag - but I do have some things I leave for them too. Refrigerator magnets, or unique (cute) bag clips, shoe or boot laces (hey! You never know when a hiker might break a shoelace!), someone up above mentioned the little packs of tissues - I have left them as well. I do notice a LOT of junk in most of the caches I find - and I must say it is VERY disappointing to my granddaughter when we finally find a good sized cache... and it has bunk in it! She's very generous (with my stuff) though and always wants to leave a few things in those caches -- even though there's nothing there she wants to take. And I really DO think the farther you have to hike for it, the more cachers take care and to be generous. I know I haven't released my first TB yet because I'm waiting for just the right cache. Hopefully soon! But I'll wait until I find it!

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I rarely trade, but I do find it intersting pawing through swag.

 

When I bring the kids with me, trading is essential for their happiness. They don't care what they get as long as it's something. Doesn't have to be expensive. Quite frankly most of the stuff they trade quickly ends up on the floor and I just put it back in the swag bag and drop it off at the next cache. :D

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Great thread, I'm fairly new to this but I took the time to read the site thoroughly before I did my first cache.

 

I started by buying small items like keyrings, stickers, fridge magnets for our local bazzar shops, we have lots of these in Spain. Cost per item was between 50c and 2 euros.

 

I have since started making my own swag items such as bookmarks, phone charms, bracelets etc which I leave as signature items and I try and leave something for adults and something for children. (if anyone is interested, you can see my handmade swag here:Team Fat Dog link

 

If the cache is pretty empty I will often leave 5 or 6 items without taking anything, so the next cacher has a nice surprise rather than a big box of nothing.

 

I tend to have little caching collections, my caching bag has badges on it that I have collected from caches and I have around 5 bracelets on my wrist from caches too. If there is nothing that I find interesting I won't take anything and I always trade up.

 

If I find a cache, as I often do, which is full of broken silly bands, rusty hair clips or worse, beer bottle tops and stones, I will empty the rubbish and try to leave something nice for the next person.

I'm also amazed at how often I find lighters in caches, they should always be removed as they are not exactly child friendly.

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Last summer when my parents were moving out of my childhood home I put away several backpacks worth of good swag that was the accumulation of 3 childhoods. I still have quite a bit of that swag even though I've generously stocked most caches I've come across.

 

Another swag thing I like to do is pick up a pack of cheap keychains or whatever while traveling and then leave them as swag items when I get home. Pretty minimal effort for a unique item, and not that expensive.

 

As for items I've enjoyed there have been a few I've traded for, namely little camping/outdoorsy trinkets seem to work well if you want to target the adults instead of the kids (though I did a pretty good rubber duckie collection on my dashboard when I still had a car!). The biggest godsends for me though have been occasional packets of those wet wipes with insect spray on them- they can be a godsend when in a buggy area!

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I very rarely take anything from caches but I have always enjoyed leaving things. When one CO reported that he had forgotten to bring along swag for an ammo he had just placed, I went to find the cache and filled it for him. I've only placed 2 caches of my own, so bringing along some decent swag is just my way of thanking those who take the time to places caches for me to find.

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The biggest godsends for me though have been occasional packets of those wet wipes with insect spray on them- they can be a godsend when in a buggy area!

 

What a FABULOUS idea! I am going to pick up some of those tomorrow to add to my cache bag! THANK YOU!!! :D

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1. I care but I am also fully aware that many don't.

 

2. I always trade up but only for kids. I figure adults can go buy their own junk.

 

3. If you are an adult and want to leave something for adults, signature items are the best.

Pretty much my thoughts as well. I enjoy sitting down with an old ammo can, reading the logbook page by page and trying to match up the remaining swag with the visitors of caching past. Unless I see something my daughter would like, I'll rarely trade, though I do make a habit of leaving a signature item in every cache they'll fit in. These items range from a mini baggie with a few antique foreign coins, a handmade geocaching keychain or a small, round, metal, personalized disk with a hole in it. (rhymes with mathgags)

 

One thing I've witnessed many times is a phenomenon I like to call "Swag Karma", in which someone with no handy trade items takes a desired item from a cache, expressing something to the effect of, "I'll leave two things in the next cache I find to balance taking this one item", or, "I've left so much swag in other caches without taking anything that I deserve this item". Whilst that might effectively balance their personal swag karma, (assuming they actually follow through), it does nothing for the cache they just took something from.

 

I've also noticed that, contrary to what I've read in these forums, swag degradation is not a universal problem. There seems to be a formula in play that states "The speed in which swag degrades is in inverse proportion to the number of calories required to reach the cache". This is something you can actually test for yourself by stocking two ammo cans with identical swag. Hide one about 5' from parking, and the other about 5000' from parking, then inventory each cache after every 5 visits. The cache closest to parking will degrade at a disproportionate rate to the cache that requires a lengthy hike. It seems that those folks most attracted to P&Gs are more likely to utilize unfair trading practices. If the difficult cache is challenging enough to earn word of mouth recommendations, you might even find that the overall swag value increases over time, as many folks who are attracted to the type of cache that takes all day to acquire often bring some unique swag item to leave as a memento of their visit.

 

On a separate note, I would like to ask, nay, beg, that you cease and desist leaving bubble liquid.

 

I've had way too many caches ruined by that stuff.

 

I agree with all including NEVER add liquid trade items.

The best liquid item ive seen was a "snow from utah" in a ziplock bag. YES! the bag popped open and soaked everything!

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I like SWAG even though I don't always trade.

 

But there's a little piece of my mind that, when I find a film can or something like that, says "That's not a _real_ geocache".

 

I find it more entertaining to look through the stuff and get a few extra chuckles about the things I find.

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we are fairly new to this, and I decided to look this topic up to see if it was just our area or if this happenes everywhere. I guess we are not alone! We are in our 30's, no kids, and frankly, we feel micros are boring and enjoy the larger ones better. since it is referred to as the "worldwide treasure hunt", I feel there should be treasure at the end of the hunt whether you want to trade or not. What ends up in that box is really turning me off to the game. Its really disrespectful to leave the crap that people do. Used chapstick? Bobby pins? screws and rusty bolts? And this is why I have no faith in people. Someone mentioned broken crayons. Ive seen that too as well as broken chalk. We dont actually use the things we find, soI dont expect much, but we display our "treasures" in a shelved shadow box. We always try to leave something equal, but I really havent dipped into my "good stuff" yet. Its really disappointing to walk so far to a cache and see it filled with stuff I'd find under my car seat. Are you just that dumb that you're not prepared? Or just greedy and want to piss on someone else's day? Ive seen some ok things, but usually there is just one "ok" thing in every box. Only one cache did we have to choose. you dont have to spend a lot to make someone happy. id rather see an empty box than one full of garbage.

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we are fairly new to this, and I decided to look this topic up to see if it was just our area or if this happenes everywhere. I guess we are not alone! We are in our 30's, no kids, and frankly, we feel micros are boring and enjoy the larger ones better. since it is referred to as the "worldwide treasure hunt", I feel there should be treasure at the end of the hunt whether you want to trade or not. What ends up in that box is really turning me off to the game. Its really disrespectful to leave the crap that people do. Used chapstick? Bobby pins? screws and rusty bolts? And this is why I have no faith in people. Someone mentioned broken crayons. Ive seen that too as well as broken chalk. We dont actually use the things we find, soI dont expect much, but we display our "treasures" in a shelved shadow box. We always try to leave something equal, but I really havent dipped into my "good stuff" yet. Its really disappointing to walk so far to a cache and see it filled with stuff I'd find under my car seat. Are you just that dumb that you're not prepared? Or just greedy and want to piss on someone else's day? Ive seen some ok things, but usually there is just one "ok" thing in every box. Only one cache did we have to choose. you dont have to spend a lot to make someone happy. id rather see an empty box than one full of garbage.

 

Try rocks and sticks! Can't understand what's going through people's minds when they put stuff like that in!?!

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since it is referred to as the "worldwide treasure hunt", I feel there should be treasure at the end of the hunt whether you want to trade or not.
As I mentioned in my reply to your other post, that's part of why I avoid describing geocaching as a "treasure hunt". Instead, I describe it as a "scavenger hunt". The things you find in a scavenger hunt are usually of little value, and the point is the experience of finding them.
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we only trade stuff when the kids are long,

but often it is a huge disapointment to see trash in caches !

and swag rotten and all green growing bacterias all over items,

so my kids are not alowed to touch anything in caches like this.

why do people put trash in ?

why do people put in good swag in containers that show very clear evidense it is not water tight ?

why to people use very bad containers ?

why do people not maintain their caches ?

why do people make caches far away from where they live ?

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since it is referred to as the "worldwide treasure hunt", I feel there should be treasure at the end of the hunt whether you want to trade or not.
As I mentioned in my reply to your other post, that's part of why I avoid describing geocaching as a "treasure hunt". Instead, I describe it as a "scavenger hunt". The things you find in a scavenger hunt are usually of little value, and the point is the experience of finding them.

I prefer "High Tech Hide & Seek".

No entitlement potential. B)

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I'm new to geocaching, only found a few easy ones so far, but have not taken anything out, just signed the logbooks. This is a fascinating read though, and some real ideas about what to leave. I'm currently moving house and was about to throw out a lot of child friendly stuff, but now will sort through instead and keep the best items and just drop off in caches as I go.

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why do people put trash in ?

 

Very often nice items turn to trash over time.

 

 

why do people put in good swag in containers that show very clear evidense it is not water tight ?

 

Actually, the water-tightness does not help. First of all, dampness can easily get into the cache when opened.

Second, after touching nice items five times with dirty fingers, they will not look any longer nice unless they are

packed into plastic. It is the same as with putting very nice log books in a cache. I typically feel very bad at such caches

as I typically add some dirt spots to such log books when the cache is hidden in more difficult terrain or when some part of the

route leads to more difficult terrain.

 

why to people use very bad containers ?

why do people not maintain their caches ?

 

For me it is not the task of a cache hider to take care about swag at all.

I put no swag into the container as I prefer caches with no swag and swag over the time only

causes troubles. If others put objects there, this is not my issue.

Often caches do not close well only because other stuff things into the cache container.

No one asked them to put items into the cache.

I do not regard it as courtesy if someone is putting trade items in a cache that has been

empty from the beginning.

 

 

why do people make caches far away from where they live ?

 

Depending on how you define far, there can be many possible answers. many of the nicest hiking caches I have done have not been hidden by people

living there. Most cachers live in cities and close to cities and not in the mountains.

 

Cezanne

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