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Promoting Geocaching in the local paper


ScoutDadNC
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Has anyone ever been approached about taking a reporter on a caching run. Kind of like they have done on the PBS channels.

 

I was thinking about how a news story on geocaching might affect geocaching. Getting more people out and active. Might get some more healthy people out there.

 

Anyone ever run into this? Good, bad, or indifferent.

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It could go either way. You might get some more good people interested, you might get some less savory folks interested, you might get some people who try it and don't like it, and you might get no interest at all. Please though, for the love of Pete, don't use the phrase "treasure hunt".

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Yes, I have done it a few times. Be sure it is a good location, good coordiantes, and a good container. I like to use places near (not in) commonly accessed hiking spaces with short walks (300-800 ft), durable containers and I recommend stopping by the day before you take them out there to be sure it is well stock and cleared of trash. Cheap (and shiney) trinkets are good, but obviously broken items and excessive paper/business cards. Keep it shiney, but cheap. If your show them $50 worth of 'bounty' in a large ammo can, then that will attract cache maggots.

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I took the local big newspaper reporter out to some of my caches in 2003 and again in 2005.

 

By 2007 they had totally forgotten that they had ever run a story on Geocaching and ran a front page headline story about it being a NEW activity with a photo of one of my caches and the local Parks Manager touting it.

 

I took a TV crew out to a cache in 2004 in Wyoming as well. That was fun.

 

I have twice spoken with a radio reporter about Geocaching as well. Saw a couple of fly-by-night newbies run out and hide a few and find a few before fading back into the woodwork.

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Has anyone ever been approached about taking a reporter on a caching run. Kind of like they have done on the PBS channels.

 

I was thinking about how a news story on geocaching might affect geocaching. Getting more people out and active. Might get some more healthy people out there.

 

Anyone ever run into this? Good, bad, or indifferent.

 

I'm sure the official take on this is that it is good. My personal opinion... we don't need publicity. Those that should geocache will geocache. They will discover it. I don't want everybody in the world geocaching, or knowing about geocaching.

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Has anyone ever been approached about taking a reporter on a caching run. Kind of like they have done on the PBS channels.

 

I was thinking about how a news story on geocaching might affect geocaching. Getting more people out and active. Might get some more healthy people out there.

 

Anyone ever run into this? Good, bad, or indifferent.

 

Have I ever been approached? Once, I turned them down. Mainly privacy concerns, I'd say. But there is a 60 something female cacher in my area who has been the subject of at least 5 interviews since 2002! I think it's only 5. One of them a long radio piece on the local PBS station, that I must say, was outstanding. I suppose she does it the same way as Moderator Moose Mob says in Post #3. I'd roll with that, good advice.

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Has anyone ever been approached about taking a reporter on a caching run. Kind of like they have done on the PBS channels.

 

I was thinking about how a news story on geocaching might affect geocaching. Getting more people out and active. Might get some more healthy people out there.

 

Anyone ever run into this? Good, bad, or indifferent.

 

Several times. I even made the front page of the Providence Journal (on a Saturday) a couple years back.

 

I invited a couple of other local cachers, including a family with a couple younger kids, to give a cross section of "whys & hows" for the article.

 

I don't recall a "surge" in new cachers in the area, so it likely has very little effect on the game.

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I was sitting in a pub, years ago, when I had got back into Geocaching after a haitus. I was fiddling around with my GPSr on the bar and talking about what a great morning I had with, like three whole finds and I was chatting with one of the pub owners regarding hides and stuff, when a woman next to me asked, what is this thing you are talking about? She had heard of some kind of hunting game with satellites but was now getting introduced to it. I offered to take her down the street to where I knew one was hidden, but she was already pulling out her notebook and scribbling down the things we (the pub owner and I) were talking about. I think he finally took her and her husband on a brief outing to find a cache and her head was utterly reeling, this was going on all over the place and now she was in on it. I was mentioned by trade (computer geek) but not by name in the article and it was generally accurate, which is a big plus considering my previous episodes of being featured on newsstands (often with words added which I had not said.) That was back in 2007.

 

Best of luck getting a reporter who sticks to accuracy over sensationalizing things to polish the story a bit - "and after Indiana Jones joined us we were off and searching for the Lair of the Ultra Weasel and the treasure hidden there!"

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I've been out with reporters several times. Some excellent articles came out of it. I always make sure to mention several times that caches are never buried, because for some reason nearly every reporter loves to play up the buried treasure thing.

 

Excellent point, and allow me to stress your words, "MENTION SEVERAL TIMES". Not long ago, somebody posted that they had been interviewed, and mentioned that once, but it was not used in the article. I think, if I were to do an interview, I would make that a mantra.

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I've been out with reporters several times. Some excellent articles came out of it. I always make sure to mention several times that caches are never buried, because for some reason nearly every reporter loves to play up the buried treasure thing.

 

Excellent point, and allow me to stress your words, "MENTION SEVERAL TIMES". Not long ago, somebody posted that they had been interviewed, and mentioned that once, but it was not used in the article. I think, if I were to do an interview, I would make that a mantra.

 

This is why I discourage people refering to it as "Treasure hunt" and urge a comparison to "Easter Egg hunt, using satellite technology" Not too often an Easter Egg hunt involves a shovel (but I'm sure there's always one in a crowd :rolleyes: )

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Has anyone ever been approached about taking a reporter on a caching run. Kind of like they have done on the PBS channels.

 

I was thinking about how a news story on geocaching might affect geocaching. Getting more people out and active. Might get some more healthy people out there.

 

Anyone ever run into this? Good, bad, or indifferent.

About three years ago, kelinore and I took a Columbus Alive reporter on a short caching run on the Ohio State University campus. It was fun, and the article that resulted was reasonably accurate.

 

--Larry

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I'm sure the official take on this is that it is good. My personal opinion... we don't need publicity. Those that should geocache will geocache. They will discover it. I don't want everybody in the world geocaching, or knowing about geocaching.

I disagree. I want more caches hidden.

 

What we really need is the under-represented cachers to get into geocaching.

 

* Cachers in the "dangerous" neighborhoods that have no caches.

* Cachers in the "poor" but not dangerous neighborhoods that have no caches.

* Cachers in small rural towns that have no caches.

* Cachers in small suburban towns that have no caches.

* Millionaire cachers that will spend the $25 to hide caches in PA state parks... Which, for some reason, have not had any new caches since they charged a fee. And yes, put some $20's and $50's for the FTF's.

 

From what i've noticed, it's basically only rich portions of highly populated areas that get high saturation. It's a shame, so many beautiful small rural/suburban towns without caches. So many poor neighborhoods with a not-so-high crime rate that could use more caches. I already hid one in a poor neighborhood that doesn't have much crime. Only been robbed of $5, once. I could use without the dangerous neighborhoods, but, however, I would like the option to go to these neighborhoods. Plus, i'd like a legitimate excuse to visit an open-air drug market.

 

The issue is, it really is only the rich sections of highly populated cities/suburbs. We need to target the demographics least represented in geocaching.

 

I firmly believe this.

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I'm sure the official take on this is that it is good. My personal opinion... we don't need publicity. Those that should geocache will geocache. They will discover it. I don't want everybody in the world geocaching, or knowing about geocaching.

I disagree. I want more caches hidden.

 

What we really need is the under-represented cachers to get into geocaching.

 

* Cachers in the "dangerous" neighborhoods that have no caches.

* Cachers in the "poor" but not dangerous neighborhoods that have no caches.

* Cachers in small rural towns that have no caches.

* Cachers in small suburban towns that have no caches.

* Millionaire cachers that will spend the $25 to hide caches in PA state parks... Which, for some reason, have not had any new caches since they charged a fee. And yes, put some $20's and $50's for the FTF's.

 

From what i've noticed, it's basically only rich portions of highly populated areas that get high saturation. It's a shame, so many beautiful small rural/suburban towns without caches. So many poor neighborhoods with a not-so-high crime rate that could use more caches. I already hid one in a poor neighborhood that doesn't have much crime. Only been robbed of $5, once. I could use without the dangerous neighborhoods, but, however, I would like the option to go to these neighborhoods. Plus, i'd like a legitimate excuse to visit an open-air drug market.

 

The issue is, it really is only the rich sections of highly populated cities/suburbs. We need to target the demographics least represented in geocaching.

 

I firmly believe this.

Yeah, I know you do.

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I'm sure the official take on this is that it is good. My personal opinion... we don't need publicity. Those that should geocache will geocache. They will discover it. I don't want everybody in the world geocaching, or knowing about geocaching.

I disagree. I want more caches hidden.

 

What we really need is the under-represented cachers to get into geocaching.

 

* Cachers in the "dangerous" neighborhoods that have no caches.

* Cachers in the "poor" but not dangerous neighborhoods that have no caches.

* Cachers in small rural towns that have no caches.

* Cachers in small suburban towns that have no caches.

* Millionaire cachers that will spend the $25 to hide caches in PA state parks... Which, for some reason, have not had any new caches since they charged a fee. And yes, put some $20's and $50's for the FTF's.

 

From what i've noticed, it's basically only rich portions of highly populated areas that get high saturation. It's a shame, so many beautiful small rural/suburban towns without caches. So many poor neighborhoods with a not-so-high crime rate that could use more caches. I already hid one in a poor neighborhood that doesn't have much crime. Only been robbed of $5, once. I could use without the dangerous neighborhoods, but, however, I would like the option to go to these neighborhoods. Plus, i'd like a legitimate excuse to visit an open-air drug market.

 

The issue is, it really is only the rich sections of highly populated cities/suburbs. We need to target the demographics least represented in geocaching.

 

I firmly believe this.

 

I.....

 

Wait, maybe....

 

But what if....

 

This makes no sense to me. I'm gonna read it again in a few minutes to see if it's any more coherent...

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I already hid one in a poor neighborhood that doesn't have much crime. Only been robbed of $5, once.

 

So in order to qualify as having "much crime" would they need to rob you more often or just for larger dollar amounts? :blink:

 

Back to topic...

 

I'm also an elitist. I believe the day I joined is the day you knew caching had gone too mainstream.

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We need to target the demographics least represented in geocaching.
Okay, I've thought about this some more, and I still don't get it. Why do geocachers need to target "underrepresented" demographics? Do model airplane builders worry about "underrepresented" demographics? Do stamp collectors? Do cyclists? Do wine collectors? Do sports fans?

 

My experience with gimmick car rallyes and card/board games is that it is more effective to promote the hobby among "overrepresented" demographics, because those are the people most likely to enjoy the hobby, and the most likely to continue in it.

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I'm sure the official take on this is that it is good. My personal opinion... we don't need publicity. Those that should geocache will geocache. They will discover it. I don't want everybody in the world geocaching, or knowing about geocaching.

I disagree. I want more caches hidden.

 

What we really need is the under-represented cachers to get into geocaching.

 

* Cachers in the "dangerous" neighborhoods that have no caches.

* Cachers in the "poor" but not dangerous neighborhoods that have no caches.

* Cachers in small rural towns that have no caches.

* Cachers in small suburban towns that have no caches.

* Millionaire cachers that will spend the $25 to hide caches in PA state parks... Which, for some reason, have not had any new caches since they charged a fee. And yes, put some $20's and $50's for the FTF's.

 

From what i've noticed, it's basically only rich portions of highly populated areas that get high saturation. It's a shame, so many beautiful small rural/suburban towns without caches. So many poor neighborhoods with a not-so-high crime rate that could use more caches. I already hid one in a poor neighborhood that doesn't have much crime. Only been robbed of $5, once. I could use without the dangerous neighborhoods, but, however, I would like the option to go to these neighborhoods. Plus, i'd like a legitimate excuse to visit an open-air drug market.

 

The issue is, it really is only the rich sections of highly populated cities/suburbs. We need to target the demographics least represented in geocaching.

 

I firmly believe this.

 

You probably want a pony too.

Or maybe just a dining car in the local train that serves milkshakes?

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I'm sure the official take on this is that it is good. My personal opinion... we don't need publicity. Those that should geocache will geocache. They will discover it. I don't want everybody in the world geocaching, or knowing about geocaching.

I disagree. I want more caches hidden.

 

What we really need is the under-represented cachers to get into geocaching.

 

* Cachers in the "dangerous" neighborhoods that have no caches.

* Cachers in the "poor" but not dangerous neighborhoods that have no caches.

* Cachers in small rural towns that have no caches.

* Cachers in small suburban towns that have no caches.

* Millionaire cachers that will spend the $25 to hide caches in PA state parks... Which, for some reason, have not had any new caches since they charged a fee. And yes, put some $20's and $50's for the FTF's.

 

From what i've noticed, it's basically only rich portions of highly populated areas that get high saturation. It's a shame, so many beautiful small rural/suburban towns without caches. So many poor neighborhoods with a not-so-high crime rate that could use more caches. I already hid one in a poor neighborhood that doesn't have much crime. Only been robbed of $5, once. I could use without the dangerous neighborhoods, but, however, I would like the option to go to these neighborhoods. Plus, i'd like a legitimate excuse to visit an open-air drug market.

 

The issue is, it really is only the rich sections of highly populated cities/suburbs. We need to target the demographics least represented in geocaching.

 

I firmly believe this.

 

You probably want a pony too.

Or maybe just a dining car in the local train that serves milkshakes?

 

I'd like a really gnarly case of cheap beer, and when I go to open it up, a black cat's head comes popping out of the box. :blink: (Get it? Wimseyguy's avatar?)

 

Coldgears, what are you talking about? Groundpeak has the demographics, at least for premium members; I've taken I think 3 surveys over the years. If I were them, I'd market primarly to 35-54 year old white males, with family incomes of $75,000 or greater.

Edited by Mr.Yuck
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I'm sure the official take on this is that it is good. My personal opinion... we don't need publicity. Those that should geocache will geocache. They will discover it. I don't want everybody in the world geocaching, or knowing about geocaching.

I disagree. I want more caches hidden.

 

What we really need is the under-represented cachers to get into geocaching.

 

* Cachers in the "dangerous" neighborhoods that have no caches.

* Cachers in the "poor" but not dangerous neighborhoods that have no caches.

* Cachers in small rural towns that have no caches.

* Cachers in small suburban towns that have no caches.

* Millionaire cachers that will spend the $25 to hide caches in PA state parks... Which, for some reason, have not had any new caches since they charged a fee. And yes, put some $20's and $50's for the FTF's.

 

From what i've noticed, it's basically only rich portions of highly populated areas that get high saturation. It's a shame, so many beautiful small rural/suburban towns without caches. So many poor neighborhoods with a not-so-high crime rate that could use more caches. I already hid one in a poor neighborhood that doesn't have much crime. Only been robbed of $5, once. I could use without the dangerous neighborhoods, but, however, I would like the option to go to these neighborhoods. Plus, i'd like a legitimate excuse to visit an open-air drug market.

 

The issue is, it really is only the rich sections of highly populated cities/suburbs. We need to target the demographics least represented in geocaching.

 

I firmly believe this.

 

You probably want a pony too.

Or maybe just a dining car in the local train that serves milkshakes?

 

I'd like a really gnarly case of cheap beer, and when I go to open it up, a black cat's head comes popping out of the box. :blink: (Get it? Wimseyguy's avatar?)

 

Coldgears, what are you talking about? Groundpeak has the demographics, at least for premium members; I've taken I think 3 surveys over the years. If I were them, I'd market primarly to 35-54 year old white males, with family incomes of $75,000 or greater.

 

If this were the target demographics, then I would have never gotten in. I enjoy Geocaching because it is something that I can do, can do with my family or other caching buddies, and it really does not cost anything more than you are willing to invest. I sure do not make $75,000 a year and it will be a long time before I do.

 

I started this to promote the hobby and also to bring into light something that can help the community as a whole. In a world where many are overweight and out of shape, geocaching may be one way to get more people active and moving. It requires a little use of computers, but more use of the outdoors. So why not promote something that can help make society a little healthier.

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Hey Scoutdad-I think it's great you want to encourage greater exposure of our activity in your part of the state. Geocaching gets written up in local and regional papers several times a week now. There is an archive link on the front page of the website. It might be a good idea for you to scan a few other articles to get an idea for what reporters elsewhere are interested in writing about.

 

As already posted-do some recon to ensure that the caches you take your reporter to are in decent shape, and actually there to be found. It might be a good idea to make sure the cache owners are OK with your revealing them as well.

 

The Tarheel Traveler feature on WRAL in Raleigh showed a cache on an episode a few years back, but it wasn't ID'd as a cache then. The CO was at the event we attended last weekend.

 

I've talked to the press several times about my work. They end up using about 20% of what you actually tell them, and not always that accurately. That's why organizations issue press releases with the facts they want quoted.

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I've talked to the press several times about my work. They end up using about 20% of what you actually tell them, and not always that accurately. That's why organizations issue press releases with the facts they want quoted.

 

Have some experience with this myself. I remember one interview I had and the article which came out after. The guy really muddled things up and I had to explain/correct things over and over for months when talking to people who had read the article. Next time I got interviewd by the same guy, I got smart. Actually, I wasn't able to be there in person so I wrote something up and mailed it in. The reporter just quoted bits and pieces from what I wrote so at least this time the article was 100% accurate.

 

I think it's a good idea whenever talking to a reporter to have a summary of the most important points you want to impress on them on paper that they can keep and refer to as they write their article.

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To answer your original question, I say go for it, great idea!

 

There are some who say there's no need to advertise, however, I remember how furious I was when I found out about geocaching and couldn't believe no one had told me about it. I actually knew people who cached, saw these people on a weekly basis and they had never told me about it - infuriating!!

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I've been approached over the phone and went out with one. If you look at my profile at the top of my stats you can see two of them. If you do, pick the best ones that will show others some great places they could visit. Lamp skirt hides you can just say they are great for practice.

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About 7 years ago, we had a local newspaper reporter come to one of our events and interview a few of us. Then, my husband and 2 little kids (at the time, :P ) took one of the newspaper photographers out caching. We went to 2 caches we hadn't been to before, on a nature type trail. It turned out well, the article was well done, and the photographer had a good time.

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