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Lost, Oregon 550t, Lathkill


Amberel
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Yesterday (20th March) I lost my Oregon 550t in the Lathkill valley, in the south of the Peak District. We went back but didn't see it, but a few walkers had passed us in the other direction. I know it's a very slim chance, but I'm hoping one of those walkers picked it up, and realising it was a geocaching unit, might come on here and find the thread.

 

Rgds, Andy

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Did you happen to add your contact info input to the startup.txt file found in the Garmin folder?

No, I've always had a slight concern about that - I wouldn't want to be too easily traceable from the information in the unit when I'm away from home.

 

Rgds, Andy

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I wouldn't want to be too easily traceable from the information in the unit when I'm away from home.

 

I've just got an Email address and mobile phone number on mine, on the other hand there's usually a waypoint for home as well :ph34r: mabye I'll rename it!

 

Have you tried posting a note on the cache pages around that area just in case someone found it who doesn't use the forums.

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It's so easily done, I was out caching with a friend a few weeks back, after a coffee stop on a handy bench we set off to continue the series, he was walking away when I noticed his Oregon on the bench.

 

I suggested that "It may be easier to find the next cache if he had it with him" :laughing:

 

I hope you get it back

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I wouldn't want to be too easily traceable from the information in the unit when I'm away from home.

 

I've just got an Email address and mobile phone number on mine, on the other hand there's usually a waypoint for home as well :ph34r: mabye I'll rename it!

 

Have you tried posting a note on the cache pages around that area just in case someone found it who doesn't use the forums.

I'm fairly sure that my home address could be located without too much difficulty using either my email address or my phone number. I have interests other than geocaching, and my business has many links on the web, it could all be put together easily enough. Or maybe I'm being too paranoid :laughing: .

 

We only did 3 caches, and I posted a note on all of them the minute I got home, but thanks for the suggestion all the same.

 

Rgds, Andy

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It's so easily done, I was out caching with a friend a few weeks back, after a coffee stop on a handy bench we set off to continue the series, he was walking away when I noticed his Oregon on the bench.

 

I suggested that "It may be easier to find the next cache if he had it with him" :laughing:

 

I hope you get it back

In this case we had a 3.5 mile walk from the last cache back to the campervan, which was following the stream up the valley all the way and for which we didn't need the GPS, so it may have been some time before I noticed. I don't know if it was where we last stopped, or if it just fell out of my pocket on the way - the waist strap of my rucksack effectively reduces the depth of my pockets. We did go back to where we had last stopped, but it wasn't there. But 2 or 3 walkers had passed us going in the opposite direction.

 

I'll look on the bright side - given the choice of losing the Oregon or the phone, I'd have chosen the Oregon :laughing: .

 

It's back to using the old eTrex HCx and/or the iPhone 4S until I decide what to do next. Assuming I don't get it back I'll need to replace it, because the eTrex is too limited and the iPhone is insufficiently rugged (especially for use as SatNav on the motor-bike). The Oregon is pretty good but Garmin haven't been in my good books ever since starting up their website using the opencaching name, which conflicted with the existing opencaching sites and has caused much confusion. But I think Garmin pretty much have the caching GPS market sewn up - last time I looked the competition weren't really in the same league, and I'm not going to cut off my nose to spite my face.

 

Rgds, Andy

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I lost a 60CSx a few weeks ago. It unclipped it's self from my rucksack strap as I was crossing a meadow on my way back the car. I didn't realise it was missing until I arrived home. I couldn't go back immediately but when I did go back a few days later, I didn't find it. As it was switched on when I lost it, it sat in the grass recording it's location until the battery went flat. It was subsequently found by a beater for the local shoot and handed to the farmer who owned the land. Some time later, his son eventually put new batteries in, switched it on and saw my contact details on the front page. They phoned me to say they'd found it and I collected it the next day.... a few days after I'd acquired a replacement :)

 

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My unit shows my name and phone number on startup, with numbers both in the US and the UK as it's conceivable I'd lose it in either country.

 

If someone is honest enough to want to return it they'll call my cellphone and I'll gladly cover their costs. If they aren't honest no amount of information will make them turn down their good fortune.

 

I agree that I wouldn't want my home address too readily available, especially if my GPS is lost some distance from home and it's clear to the finder that I'm probably not home for a few days. My "home" waypoint in my TomTom is a short distance from my actual home - close enough that "navigate home" gives me a meaningful route but far enough that anyone finding it would only be able to narrow down the general area I live.

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My eTrex Yellow (pre-H model from the late 18th century, approx.) doesn't have a programmable start-up screen or anything so advanced... so my phone number is on a sticker inside the battery compartment. Since I got a Geolympix Lanyard I've never walked off without it, dropped it or otherwise lost it. It also makes it handy to hang off a door handle so I don't mislay it at home. It sits there, dolefully looking at me like a dog that wants a walk :)

 

I hope your Oregon turns up Amberel. Fingers crossed it was an honest walker who found it.

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My eTrex Yellow (pre-H model from the late 18th century, approx.) doesn't have a programmable start-up screen or anything so advanced... so my phone number is on a sticker inside the battery compartment. Since I got a Geolympix Lanyard I've never walked off without it, dropped it or otherwise lost it. It also makes it handy to hang off a door handle so I don't mislay it at home. It sits there, dolefully looking at me like a dog that wants a walk :)

 

I hope your Oregon turns up Amberel. Fingers crossed it was an honest walker who found it.

Thanks, but hope is fading. The Bakewell Police don't have it, and nor does the Lathkill pub at the top of the dale.

 

I'm reluctant to put my phone number on or in it - I'm fairly sure it wouldn't be very difficult to work backwards to my address using that.

 

Rgds, Andy

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I'm reluctant to put my phone number on or in it - I'm fairly sure it wouldn't be very difficult to work backwards to my address using that.

 

Rgds, Andy

 

Create an Email account with gmail (or other free mail provider), it doesn't need to bear any resemblance to your real identity, and have it auto forward to your real mail account.

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I'm reluctant to put my phone number on or in it - I'm fairly sure it wouldn't be very difficult to work backwards to my address using that.

 

Rgds, Andy

 

Create an Email account with gmail (or other free mail provider), it doesn't need to bear any resemblance to your real identity, and have it auto forward to your real mail account.

 

Yep, or put a cellphone number on it. If you don't want your real cellphone on it get one of the £7.99 burner PAYG phones from a T-Mobile shop and use that instead.

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My eTrex Yellow (pre-H model from the late 18th century, approx.) doesn't have a programmable start-up screen or anything so advanced... so my phone number is on a sticker inside the battery compartment. Since I got a Geolympix Lanyard I've never walked off without it, dropped it or otherwise lost it. It also makes it handy to hang off a door handle so I don't mislay it at home. It sits there, dolefully looking at me like a dog that wants a walk :)

 

I hope your Oregon turns up Amberel. Fingers crossed it was an honest walker who found it.

Same tracker as SP and same cutting edge method of recording who it belongs to.

One of the many upsides of the old eTrex is it is cheap to replace. We are fortunate to have only ever lost one and it was of course, left at the last cache of the day. We went back the following day but no luck.

I hope you find it Andy.

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I'm reluctant to put my phone number on or in it - I'm fairly sure it wouldn't be very difficult to work backwards to my address using that.

 

Rgds, Andy

 

Create an Email account with gmail (or other free mail provider), it doesn't need to bear any resemblance to your real identity, and have it auto forward to your real mail account.

That's a possible route. But I need to keep things in perspective. While it is an expensive piece of kit to lose, as far as I can recall it is the first and only thing I've ever lost.

 

Rgds, Andy

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I'm reluctant to put my phone number on or in it - I'm fairly sure it wouldn't be very difficult to work backwards to my address using that.

 

Rgds, Andy

 

Create an Email account with gmail (or other free mail provider), it doesn't need to bear any resemblance to your real identity, and have it auto forward to your real mail account.

 

Yep, or put a cellphone number on it. If you don't want your real cellphone on it get one of the £7.99 burner PAYG phones from a T-Mobile shop and use that instead.

I don't think my normal contract cellophone's details are at all secure, but I can see a PAYG should be. I've got more phones than I can shake a stick at, so would only need a SIM. But if I do anything I think MB's suggestion probably is best, provided gmail's security is good - once set up it should be transparent.

 

Rgds, Andy

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Same tracker as SP and same cutting edge method of recording who it belongs to.

One of the many upsides of the old eTrex is it is cheap to replace. We are fortunate to have only ever lost one and it was of course, left at the last cache of the day. We went back the following day but no luck.

I hope you find it Andy.

Ordered a new Oregon today, just a 450t as I never used the camera in the last one. It's my motor-bike SatNav as well as my caching machine, so can't be without it for too long. The eTrex does work as a SatNav, but not so well.

 

In the unlikely event the old one does turn up now there will be an Oregon up for sale :laughing: .

 

Rgds, Andy

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I'm reluctant to put my phone number on or in it - I'm fairly sure it wouldn't be very difficult to work backwards to my address using that.

 

Rgds, Andy

 

Create an Email account with gmail (or other free mail provider), it doesn't need to bear any resemblance to your real identity, and have it auto forward to your real mail account.

 

Yep, or put a cellphone number on it. If you don't want your real cellphone on it get one of the £7.99 burner PAYG phones from a T-Mobile shop and use that instead.

I don't think my normal contract cellophone's details are at all secure, but I can see a PAYG should be. I've got more phones than I can shake a stick at, so would only need a SIM. But if I do anything I think MB's suggestion probably is best, provided gmail's security is good - once set up it should be transparent.

 

Rgds, Andy

 

The beauty of the burner phone is that it only costs £7.99 (last I saw) and you can leave it in a drawer unless you lose something. Then turn it on and if someone calls you can link up to recover whatever it was you lost.

 

They are about as anonymous as you can ask for, buy them over the counter with cash and no questions asked.

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If you are that worried about having your mobile number in your GPS then you can set up a free voicemail number here www.switchboardfree.co.uk

You have to ring it once a month to keep the number.

However, worrying about people being able to trace your address through having your mobile or email would seem to be a little over sensitive, given the information available with the GPS already?

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I have interests other than geocaching, and my business has many links on the web, it could all be put together easily enough. Or maybe I'm being too paranoid :laughing:

 

If you are truly that concerned I suggest reviewing the link (and it's content) in your sig :ph34r:

Why is that?

 

I'm not concerned about people identifying me or finding out where I live. What I'm concerned about is them finding out where I live and that I am away from home.

 

Rgds, Andy

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I'm not concerned about people identifying me or finding out where I live. What I'm concerned about is them finding out where I live and that I am away from home.

 

Rgds, Andy

You could always delay logging until you get home, that way nobody would know you are away caching. ;):anitongue:

I generally do - that's why I'm not bothered about people identifying me from my sig :-)

 

The thing that concerns me is people finding a lost GPSr with information on it that both identifies me AND lets them know I'm away.

 

Rgds, Andy

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The thing that concerns me is people finding a lost GPSr with information on it that both identifies me AND lets them know I'm away.

 

Rgds, Andy

I wouldn't worry too much Andy. The very fact that the GPSr is lost means that you are NOT with it and therefore the likelihood is that you are somewhere else i.e. quite possibly home! :laughing::anibad:

 

Anyway, was it insured? And it's a great opportunity to treat yourself to a nice new toy. :)

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The thing that concerns me is people finding a lost GPSr with information on it that both identifies me AND lets them know I'm away.

 

Rgds, Andy

I wouldn't worry too much Andy. The very fact that the GPSr is lost means that you are NOT with it and therefore the likelihood is that you are somewhere else i.e. quite possibly home! :laughing::anibad:

 

Anyway, was it insured? And it's a great opportunity to treat yourself to a nice new toy. :)

I've already replaced it - exactly the same except I got a 450t instead of a 550t because I never used the camera. And I'm going to try out the TT maps instead of the OS 50000 maps.

 

It was insured under the house insurance, but it's not worth claiming for £244 after taking off the excess, factoring in the amount of paperwork and expecting that future years will be loaded after a claim.

 

Rgds, Andy

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I wouldn't want to be too easily traceable from the information in the unit when I'm away from home.

 

I've just got an Email address and mobile phone number on mine

 

Likewise. At least it gives a chance for an honest person to get in touch if I lost mine.

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Just to tidy this up, I now have the Oregon 550t back again. The finders took it to an outdoor sports shop in Sheffield to see if they could contact me using the serial number, when that failed they contacted the Bakewell police, who had my phone number.

 

I had purchased a replacement (well, a 450t), the unit is important as a SatNav for my motor-bike as well as for caching.

So I currently have a 450t and a 550t :lol:

 

Rgds, Andy

Edited by Amberel
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Have to say I'm amazed how paranoid some people are, the odds that some one finding your lost gps (particularly considering the settings it's likely to be lost in) are likely to be into beaking and entering is very slim, the odds that they are going to bother travelling to your home location to do so are even slimmer, and if you do happen to be unlucky enough to have it found my some one who would do both of those things, the "knowing I'm away from home" arument is silly, how on earth do they know when you dropped the thing, or how long you were away for??

 

It also amazes me that people feel the need to have a home waypoint saved in a gps / satnav, I can't understand how you would ever need this?

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It also amazes me that people feel the need to have a home waypoint saved in a gps / satnav, I can't understand how you would ever need this?

 

Well yesterday I was in the middle of the Warwickshire countryside, when I finished I needed to get home; I know once I got on the M40 I'm well away, but how do I get on the M40? I hadn't gone there from home so retracing my route to the Motorway was a poor option, I could spend several minutes faffing around trying to plan a route from the middle of nowhere to a random junction on the Motorway, or I could just ask it to plan a route home (1 button) and let it get me onto the Motorway by the quickest route. Also once we were on the road we wanted to phone ahead to the Mother in law (who was making dinner) and give here an estimate of when we'd be back - Tom T. had a pretty good idea.

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It also amazes me that people feel the need to have a home waypoint saved in a gps / satnav, I can't understand how you would ever need this?

I'll give you regarding the gps, but satnav, definitely need home address as I often wouldn't have a clue how to get home after following the satnav's directions.

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I've never really cached to far from home so I'd only ever really used the satnav for going from home to one particular business or location where it would then just be a case of going back the way I just came. I guess if you have been using satnav to go from one unkown spot to another to another etc then back tracking is not necessarily going to be the most direct option

Edited by Raver Dave
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It also amazes me that people feel the need to have a home waypoint saved in a gps / satnav, I can't understand how you would ever need this?

 

Because it's easier to click "Navigate To" and then "Home" than it is to find my home on a list of recent destinations.

 

It's also useful on a TomTom because when I click "Browse map" it centres on my home rather than somewhere in Holland.

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As others have already said, when you're a couple of hundred miles 'up country', it's handy to be able to plug in your home co-ordinates at the push of a button.

On the sat-nav built into my car, it's just saved as an address; one among many that I have stored so it's pretty anonymous. Fortunately, I'm still able to remember my address. :blink::)

Edited by Pharisee
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Have to say I'm amazed how paranoid some people are ...

I've acknowledged that it is slightly paranoid, but much less than you appear to think.
... the odds that some one finding your lost gps (particularly considering the settings it's likely to be lost in) are likely to be into beaking and entering is very slim
If you think that the class of cachers and the class of thieves do not intersect, you are extremely optimistic. Cachers come from a complete cross-section of society. But in any case, it might be lost in the middle of London or any other city - it's my motor-cycle SatNav, it's not only used in places like Lathkill.
... the odds that they are going to bother travelling to your home location to do so are even slimmer
Thieves can use the phone too, you know.
... and if you do happen to be unlucky enough to have it found my some one who would do both of those things, the "knowing I'm away from home" arument is silly, how on earth do they know when you dropped the thing, or how long you were away for??
It was switched on, the batteries were fully charged, the trip timer showed how long since I had reset it, the track log was running. Not all thieves are stupid.

 

It also amazes me that people feel the need to have a home waypoint saved in a gps / satnav, I can't understand how you would ever need this?
The mind boggles. It's what a SatNav is for. I think you are looking at this with a very narrow perspective.

 

If you are somewhere with which you are unfamiliar, which happens to me very regularly, the quickest way to find the way home is to press the home button! A great number of my journeys are round trips where I very much wouldn't want to go the long way round to get home. And in any case, the SatNav may decide a different route is better at a different time of day, or if there are bad delays (the Oregon doesn't do this, but TomTom on the iPhone, which I use in the car and campervan does).

 

The security issue with having something identifable on the unit doesn't apply to the home location, I use a location a few hundred yards away which doesn't affect the route home when you are 100 miles away.

 

Rgds, Andy

Edited by Amberel
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