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I'm an Out-of-Date Cacher?


Totem Clan
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I was on another site talking with some of my old caching friends who know that I love hiding caches as much as finding them. The were asking me if I had any hides planned and I told them about my latest hide on working on.

 

It's a multi with 8 to 12 points with a regaular size final. All the points are on the peaks and ridges or the mountains just outside of town. It'll will be a 4 to 5 mile hike with only the first 300 feet or so being on anything that could be called a trail. All the terrian is at least 3 star at best, and some is 4.5.

 

Anyway we're talking about this and another cacher pipes in and says,

Why do you older cachers still hide stuff like that? Don't you know that only a few or you hangers on to the old ways of caching would even care about a cache like that. Hide something normal. Caching has changed. Get with the times.

Well we told her we didn't get the memo so until the Frog tells us otherwise we'll hide what we like.

 

I really don't care what she had to say, but it did make me wonder if the outdoors side of caching so being outdated. So my question is, has caching change as a whole? Are the longer hikes become more of a thing of the past? I have caches that require little to no hiking but that's not why they are there, so I get that. However has the 'culture' of caching changed so much that a hike is not a good thing anymore in the minds of many?

 

 

[but like I told her, it doesn't matter I'll still hide what I like.]

Edited by Totem Clan
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I've recently gotten to a place I way out in the swamps that I could see on a satellite view, and then returned to it via a different route. It turned out to be more interesting than I'd hoped. Route is roughly 4 miles one way. About half of that can be done trail. And then the other half can't ;-)

 

A few years ago, this would absolutely have lead to a bushwhackers hiking multi by me. Now, I'm not so sure.

 

I may place a traditional out there and let you find your own route. Or place a couple of trads along the way (or along 2 different ways, just to complicate matters).

 

Or, in the short term, simply host a Swamp Rats event out there. See who shows up (not that I don't already know who that's apt to be).

 

The trad won't get found much either, especially if it's all by itself and not at the end of a string of hides that lead the way.

 

I'm not convinced that this is much of a change from years back. Higher terrain and multi or puzzle have always had fewer finds.

 

edit speeling

Edited by Isonzo Karst
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I don't see why you would make that a multi, and I've been caching longer than you. Really, mutlis, at least in my area, never did really hit it off.

 

I'm not in it strictly for the numbers, but I don't mind the numbers, as long as the caches that get me those numbers are worth going for. But to take all day, or several days just to get one find... I probably would pass. Is there any reason why a number of regular caches wouldn't work just as well?

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I don't see why you would make that a multi, and I've been caching longer than you. Really, mutlis, at least in my area, never did really hit it off.

 

I'm not in it strictly for the numbers, but I don't mind the numbers, as long as the caches that get me those numbers are worth going for. But to take all day, or several days just to get one find... I probably would pass. Is there any reason why a number of regular caches wouldn't work just as well?

Because I want the hiker/cacher to take particular rought. I'm making my own 'hiking trail' in an area where there is noting. Also this way it will give hikers/cachers from out of the area a way to see all the great sites along the ridges without having to worry about crossing anyone's land.

 

Plus I'll be sweeting the pot with some geocoins for the first few finders.

 

Edit: to clarify. A traditional cache at each point could lead to some tresspassing problems.

Edited by Totem Clan
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I wish a few more folks would hide multis like the one described in the OP.

 

I get fed up with a few folks around my home patch throwing caches down on walks as if they were breadcrumbs. There is no way that those caches will be maintained for any length of time and quite frankly that means some of the caches will turn into little more than litter.

 

There is nothing wrong with a well laid out multi to encourage cachers to follow a sensible route.

 

Happy caching,

 

Ian.

Edited by milfmog
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you got all the right intentions,

just do it your way,

if no one go there, then you know for sure it was a bad idea :-)

 

I am sorry to admit I do filter out all puzzle and all multi caches when I go to a new contry as a turist,

simply becouse it is taking too much time, and is not for kids and wife and heavy bagage to cary.

In my own town I take it all, the bigger and harder hike, the better :-)

so I guess the same will apply to your area, and you will make a few hike freaks happy,

but you just cant make all happy, the more special you make it, the less people will see the fun.

today it is getting more and more special to solve a 8-12 point multi,

it takes several hrs, you need planning and time.. oh.. terrible.. or yay cool..

Edited by OZ2CPU
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Hide what you like and set the example for others. Look at her caches and compare the average length of the find logs to yours and I bet the difference is quite clear.

 

If I lived in the Sierras full time, I would probably be one of the most prolific hiders on this listing site. Most would be remote or take a real effort to get to and only generate a few finds a year, but the logs would make the effort worth it as the ones I have there now are worth it.

 

There is nothing better than to get a DNF on a hard cache and the DNFr is happy just to have experienced the area you brought them to.

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Personally, I'm a newer cacher and that's why I enjoy geocaching. I don't really care to find the easy ones hidden in parking lots, etc. I go to see the beauty of the world. I've been taken to some really lovely places I would not have found on my own, even in my own backyard! Going to the peaks of these mountains would certainly be a challenge I would take on! Do it!

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Because I want the hiker/cacher to take particular rought.

A traditional cache ... could lead to some tresspassing problems

 

I've considered making just the last mile and half of the approach to the point I mentioned in my first post a multicache, such that the starting point would probably keep seekers from running into the posted private outlier within the large WMA (it would force you further north then you might tend to do if chasing the arrow), and would also stop seekers from attempting a route in from the west side (which appears shorter, but isn't, unless you trespass, and cross 'gator laden waters).

 

This would also have the advantage of allowing to me show a seeker a shortish bushwhacking connection between one useful trail and another now abandoned trail, still evident, if overgrown.

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Hide what you like and set the example for others. Look at her caches and compare the average length of the find logs to yours and I bet the difference is quite clear.

 

If I lived in the Sierras full time, I would probably be one of the most prolific hiders on this listing site. Most would be remote or take a real effort to get to and only generate a few finds a year, but the logs would make the effort worth it as the ones I have there now are worth it.

 

There is nothing better than to get a DNF on a hard cache and the DNFr is happy just to have experienced the area you brought them to.

:laughing:

 

I just looked at her profile. 400+ finds in just over a year. Nothing over Ter 2.5 (and only one of those) and nothing over Dif 2. Over 90% micros. No hides yet.

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can you do it as a multi where each stop is a cache on it's own and have each cache contain clues for the final?

 

I've only done a couple of multi and in 2 of them a clue was missing :mad: so the whole afternoon was a bust even though I found 2 or 3 of the steps.

Are you talking about a bonus cache, a chain or traditional is an unknown at the end?

 

If so I would still run into the problems with folks cutting across farmers' land to get to some of the caches. One of the points will be within 300 feet of a road but all the land between is posted. In another the point is only 2 tenths of mile from a backroad where it is 1.5 airmiles from and trailhead that is the only way in that is not across private land. That's just two of them.

 

I've thought about the best way to do this and I think I've found it. I don't care if it doesn't get a lot of visiters. There is a group of cachers around here that will go for it, and that's enough for me. My point was...

 

....has caching changed that much over the years that a long hike is not considered a good cache anymore?

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It's a multi with 8 to 12 points with a regaular size final. All the points are on the peaks and ridges or the mountains just outside of town. It'll will be a 4 to 5 mile hike with only the first 300 feet or so being on anything that could be called a trail. All the terrian is at least 3 star at best, and some is 4.5.

Thank you, Thank you, Thank you! While due to your refusal to move to Florida, (blaming my dislike of travel might affect my self image :P ), I will likely never get to experience yuor caches, it gladdens my heart to see there are still folks out there who have not caved in to the P&G numbers oriented crowd. Next to Wherigo caches, multis are my favorite type. We just don't have enough of them 'round these parts. Because I am somewhat mobility limited, (two blown out knees keep my hikes around 5 miles or less), the only multis I tend to avoid are those which don't tell me up front how many stages I'll need to find and how far the journey will be.

 

Last week a few friends and I went paddling up a seldom visited creek to hide a few caches. I hid a two stage multi, which would have required a minimum of 8 miles paddling in shallow, unmaintained, gator infested waters. Sadly, the final location, which we all agreed was way kewl, was ultimately rejected by the land manager, as they did not want to encourage folks accessing their property from anywhere but the designated entry point. I did a 12 mile paddle yesterday to move the final somewhere else. I know that it will hold absolutely no appeal to the numbers oriented cachers, and since this will greatly reduce the chance that my cache page will be logged with an acronym, I'm OK with that. B)

 

Hide something normal. Caching has changed. Get with the times.

To me, that is so very sad... :(

I'm assuming she is piqued because your peaks will result in a cache she is unwilling to attempt?

Apparently, the numbers oriented cachers are vexed by not finding every cache out there.

 

...and would also stop seekers from attempting a route in from the west side (which appears shorter, but isn't, unless you trespass, and cross 'gator laden waters).

Wait... Crossing gator infested waterways is a bad thing? :unsure::ph34r:

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....has caching changed that much over the years that a long hike is not considered a good cache anymore?

Yes, and No. There are more people invovled in the sport - so there are more who like long hikes/caches, and more who don't. With the advent of apps on phones I'm guessing there are more new couch potato's than new hikers.

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....has caching changed that much over the years that a long hike is not considered a good cache anymore?

 

I think it has around here. I had one cache in a state park that was about a mile walk down a gated dirt road. Nearly every log Bragged about how they drove around the gate and drove to the cache!

 

Another cache was about .3mi down a paved bike path. A cacher drove to it and got a $300 ticket. He messaged me and tried to get me to pay it because he was only there for my cache!

 

That said, I vote place the nice long multi! I'd go find it.

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Hide something normal. Caching has changed. Get with the times.

To me, that is so very sad... :(

I'm assuming she is piqued because your peaks will result in a cache she is unwilling to attempt?

Apparently, the numbers oriented cachers are vexed by not finding every cache out there.

What's funny is she lives alomst 800 miles away. I was in a chat room with friends from the North Dakota/Minnesota area. She appears to be from the Twin Cities

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I don't see why you would make that a multi, and I've been caching longer than you. Really, mutlis, at least in my area, never did really hit it off.

 

I'm not in it strictly for the numbers, but I don't mind the numbers, as long as the caches that get me those numbers are worth going for. But to take all day, or several days just to get one find... I probably would pass. Is there any reason why a number of regular caches wouldn't work just as well?

+1

Not as many would go for a multi that far these days, but to separate them into a series with a final would attract more then a multi alone.

I have a series that some High Number cacher thought no one would do. Though it's not a hiking one it does take you to different cities and across a toll bridge for a final. As a series they don't have to do the whole thing if they don't want and still get to log each one as they do them. Mine at each one including the final told a story of the spot it is located it at.

Yours could maybe show cachers something at each cache until they get to the final. But if they quit early because they are tired or something, they won't feel like they left empty handed and might return to finish it.

Just a suggestion.

 

oops didn't see someone suggest that

Maybe make the first a traditional and the rest unknowns with a clue in each one to go to the next but still be able to log each one.

Still just a suggestion

Edited by jellis
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I love long multis. There aren't nearly enough of them out there, or at least around here. I'd chase it.

 

As far as caching changing, I'll go out on a limb and say no. The caching population may have shifted to a different majority, but that doesn't mean that there's no place for nature caches anymore. They still get found. I've only been around for a few years, but I'd imagine that the long difficult caches aren't getting found any less often than before. They may not be getting found any more often either.

 

So place it. If it's something you'd like to find, then put it out there for others to tackle. Hide what you like, and to heck with parking lot micros! Unless you like that sort of thing... :anibad:

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Hide something normal. Caching has changed. Get with the times.

To me, that is so very sad... :(

I'm assuming she is piqued because your peaks will result in a cache she is unwilling to attempt?

Apparently, the numbers oriented cachers are vexed by not finding every cache out there.

What's funny is she lives alomst 800 miles away. I was in a chat room with friends from the North Dakota/Minnesota area. She appears to be from the Twin Cities

 

My neck of the woods!

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can you do it as a multi where each stop is a cache on it's own and have each cache contain clues for the final?

 

I've only done a couple of multi and in 2 of them a clue was missing :mad: so the whole afternoon was a bust even though I found 2 or 3 of the steps.

Are you talking about a bonus cache, a chain or traditional is an unknown at the end?

 

If so I would still run into the problems with folks cutting across farmers' land to get to some of the caches. One of the points will be within 300 feet of a road but all the land between is posted. In another the point is only 2 tenths of mile from a backroad where it is 1.5 airmiles from and trailhead that is the only way in that is not across private land. That's just two of them.

 

I'm really not trying to suggest that you don't create this a single multi cache with many stages, but could the private property issues be addressed by making a combination of traditional and multi caches. For the locations where there are not private property concerns tradtional could be placed. For locations where the most obvious route from the parking coordinates to the cache might take someone through private property it could be done as a multi to direct finders on a route that does not go through private property.

 

I would probably enjoy the cache/stages either way but since you mention that you're specifically trying to attract hikers/cachers from out of the area I think it's also worth considering that out of town cachers/hikers might have a limited amount of time in the area. When I travel on business I might typically only have a few hours or so that I can spend finding a few cache *unless* I extend my trip by staying at a hotel an extra night. If I only have a few hours free for caching while far from home it's very unlikely that I'm going spend all of it on a single many stage multi, especially if there's a change that one of the stages might go missing. However, I'd prefer a 2 stage multi over a handful of parking log micros.

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I don't see why you would make that a multi, and I've been caching longer than you. Really, mutlis, at least in my area, never did really hit it off.

 

I'm not in it strictly for the numbers, but I don't mind the numbers, as long as the caches that get me those numbers are worth going for. But to take all day, or several days just to get one find... I probably would pass. Is there any reason why a number of regular caches wouldn't work just as well?

 

I totally agree here. The more stages to a multi the more likely some issue will prevent the find due to a problem at one of the stages. I would love the hike but not the aggravation of having to find 10+ stages. If you make them separate caches and I miss one or two I keep plugging away.

I admit I'm not a fan of multis and don't include them or puzzles on my PQ's when traveling......near home I look for everything.

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I would say that most of of those who aren't numbers hounds are also not bushwackers, mountain climbers, swamp hikers, and/or kayakers.

 

For example, I've found some of IK's caches and look forward to more. But some I will never do because they're swamp hikes and I like to keep my feet dry. :)

 

Depending on the bushwack involve, the OP's multicache idea sounds pretty neat. (Where I am, "bushwack" usually means "a few hundred feet through palmettos"; lesser bushwacks where I'm going off trail through light cover I don't mind.) It sounds like what I call an "epic multi" and around here they get far fewer Finds than Traditionals, but tend to accumulate lots of Favorites.

Edited by Joshism
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can you do it as a multi where each stop is a cache on it's own and have each cache contain clues for the final?

 

I've only done a couple of multi and in 2 of them a clue was missing :mad: so the whole afternoon was a bust even though I found 2 or 3 of the steps.

Are you talking about a bonus cache, a chain or traditional is an unknown at the end?

 

If so I would still run into the problems with folks cutting across farmers' land to get to some of the caches. One of the points will be within 300 feet of a road but all the land between is posted. In another the point is only 2 tenths of mile from a backroad where it is 1.5 airmiles from and trailhead that is the only way in that is not across private land. That's just two of them.

 

I'm really not trying to suggest that you don't create this a single multi cache with many stages, but could the private property issues be addressed by making a combination of traditional and multi caches. For the locations where there are not private property concerns tradtional could be placed. For locations where the most obvious route from the parking coordinates to the cache might take someone through private property it could be done as a multi to direct finders on a route that does not go through private property.

 

I would probably enjoy the cache/stages either way but since you mention that you're specifically trying to attract hikers/cachers from out of the area I think it's also worth considering that out of town cachers/hikers might have a limited amount of time in the area. When I travel on business I might typically only have a few hours or so that I can spend finding a few cache *unless* I extend my trip by staying at a hotel an extra night. If I only have a few hours free for caching while far from home it's very unlikely that I'm going spend all of it on a single many stage multi, especially if there's a change that one of the stages might go missing. However, I'd prefer a 2 stage multi over a handful of parking log micros.

 

I get this. I do however, make specific trips for the right multi cache. If it's good enough, and gets the attention of the right locals, you'll get people coming to town just to find it.

 

There's nothing wrong with putting out some traditionals along the way if there's enough space though. I'm not saying he should (I'm assuming he...) stay away from traditionals, I'm just putting my vote in for a tough, fun, challenging multi.

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I don't see why you would make that a multi, and I've been caching longer than you. Really, mutlis, at least in my area, never did really hit it off.

 

I'm not in it strictly for the numbers, but I don't mind the numbers, as long as the caches that get me those numbers are worth going for. But to take all day, or several days just to get one find... I probably would pass. Is there any reason why a number of regular caches wouldn't work just as well?

+1

Not as many would go for a multi that far these days, but to separate them into a series with a final would attract more then a multi alone.

I have a series that some High Number cacher thought no one would do. Though it's not a hiking one it does take you to different cities and across a toll bridge for a final. As a series they don't have to do the whole thing if they don't want and still get to log each one as they do them. Mine at each one including the final told a story of the spot it is located it at.

Yours could maybe show cachers something at each cache until they get to the final. But if they quit early because they are tired or something, they won't feel like they left empty handed and might return to finish it.

Just a suggestion.

 

oops didn't see someone suggest that

Maybe make the first a traditional and the rest unknowns with a clue in each one to go to the next but still be able to log each one.

Still just a suggestion

I thought about that too but still doesn't slove the private land issue.

 

This is on a ridge in a rough L shape about two miles by two miles. The whole thing is only about a half wide in places. There is only one way in or out the will not take you across private land. There are no trails beyond the lower slopes. This will be a loop in and out.

 

But that's not the point. I'm placing the Multi cache because that's what this hide calls for. The topic is...

 

.... is hiking slowly being evolved out of caching?

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I would say that most of of those who aren't numbers hounds are also not bushwackers, mountain climbers, swamp hikers, and/or kayakers.

 

For example, I've found some of IK's caches and look forward to more. But some I will never do because they're swamp hikes and I like to keep my feet dry. :)

 

Depending on the bushwack involve, the OP's multicache idea sounds pretty neat. (Where I am, "bushwack" usually means "a few hundred feet through palmettos"; lesser bushwacks where I'm going off trail through light cover I don't mind.) It sounds like what I call an "epic multi" and around here they get far fewer Finds than Traditionals, but tend to accumulate lots of Favorites.

 

A good point I hadn't thought about. Bushwacking in different regions means very different things. I would have no idea the right way to bushwack through Palmettos, but I can navigate through a wicked thicked of PO in the winter time when the sticks look like everything else around.

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I'm really not trying to suggest that you don't create this a single multi cache with many stages, but could the private property issues be addressed by making a combination of traditional and multi caches. For the locations where there are not private property concerns tradtional could be placed. For locations where the most obvious route from the parking coordinates to the cache might take someone through private property it could be done as a multi to direct finders on a route that does not go through private property.

 

That's the problem. Private property surrounds the ridgeline. The town presevered the area where the trailhead is thankfully. They saw it as a way to get some tourist into the area. Their little trail only takes you on the lower slope of a much large wilderness area set aside for enjoyment. Mainly locals use the area, but I think other cachers would love to be led back here, on a tour if you will.

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Hide what you like and set the example for others. Look at her caches and compare the average length of the find logs to yours and I bet the difference is quite clear.

 

If I lived in the Sierras full time, I would probably be one of the most prolific hiders on this listing site. Most would be remote or take a real effort to get to and only generate a few finds a year, but the logs would make the effort worth it as the ones I have there now are worth it.

 

There is nothing better than to get a DNF on a hard cache and the DNFr is happy just to have experienced the area you brought them to.

:laughing:

 

I just looked at her profile. 400+ finds in just over a year. Nothing over Ter 2.5 (and only one of those) and nothing over Dif 2. Over 90% micros. No hides yet.

 

When she hides one my money is on a whole slew of TFTC logs. :rolleyes:

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can you do it as a multi where each stop is a cache on it's own and have each cache contain clues for the final?

 

I've only done a couple of multi and in 2 of them a clue was missing :mad: so the whole afternoon was a bust even though I found 2 or 3 of the steps.

Are you talking about a bonus cache, a chain or traditional is an unknown at the end?

 

If so I would still run into the problems with folks cutting across farmers' land to get to some of the caches. One of the points will be within 300 feet of a road but all the land between is posted. In another the point is only 2 tenths of mile from a backroad where it is 1.5 airmiles from and trailhead that is the only way in that is not across private land. That's just two of them.

 

I'm really not trying to suggest that you don't create this a single multi cache with many stages, but could the private property issues be addressed by making a combination of traditional and multi caches. For the locations where there are not private property concerns tradtional could be placed. For locations where the most obvious route from the parking coordinates to the cache might take someone through private property it could be done as a multi to direct finders on a route that does not go through private property.

 

I would probably enjoy the cache/stages either way but since you mention that you're specifically trying to attract hikers/cachers from out of the area I think it's also worth considering that out of town cachers/hikers might have a limited amount of time in the area. When I travel on business I might typically only have a few hours or so that I can spend finding a few cache *unless* I extend my trip by staying at a hotel an extra night. If I only have a few hours free for caching while far from home it's very unlikely that I'm going spend all of it on a single many stage multi, especially if there's a change that one of the stages might go missing. However, I'd prefer a 2 stage multi over a handful of parking log micros.

 

I get this. I do however, make specific trips for the right multi cache. If it's good enough, and gets the attention of the right locals, you'll get people coming to town just to find it.

 

There's nothing wrong with putting out some traditionals along the way if there's enough space though. I'm not saying he should (I'm assuming he...) stay away from traditionals, I'm just putting my vote in for a tough, fun, challenging multi.

I might do that later too. Add a trad or two in just the right place, that you can grab while getting the multi.

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Hide what you like and set the example for others. Look at her caches and compare the average length of the find logs to yours and I bet the difference is quite clear.

 

If I lived in the Sierras full time, I would probably be one of the most prolific hiders on this listing site. Most would be remote or take a real effort to get to and only generate a few finds a year, but the logs would make the effort worth it as the ones I have there now are worth it.

 

There is nothing better than to get a DNF on a hard cache and the DNFr is happy just to have experienced the area you brought them to.

:laughing:

 

I just looked at her profile. 400+ finds in just over a year. Nothing over Ter 2.5 (and only one of those) and nothing over Dif 2. Over 90% micros. No hides yet.

 

When she hides one my money is on a whole slew of TFTC logs. :rolleyes:

Mine may have few logs, but I bet it will have more total words logged. :)

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The conversation may have changed in the 30 or so posts since the original, but the original is what I'm going to comment on.

 

My response: TO HELL WITH THEM

 

I see more and more power trails popping up, which are great for buffing up statistics but aren't nearly as engaging and don't usually produce the SMILE that should go with the SMILIE!

 

In essence (and speaking from the point of view of someone who only started caching last October), I think caching has become more about the statistics and less about the adventure in some areas. I would LOVE to do your 8+ stage multi! The adventure and the journey is what I would get out of the hunt.

 

So all boiled down I think geocaching certainly has factions within the hobby/sport. On one side, those who like easy-to-find caches that make their stats look unbeatable and on the other side cachers that embrace the challenge of a exceptional multi as well as value the place of every other cache!

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However has the 'culture' of caching changed so much that a hike is not a good thing anymore in the minds of many?

Absolutely not. We have a large wilderness area nearby, and over the last couple years no less than a dozen cachers have hidden HUNDREDS of caches in this area. Most involve many hours and kilometers of hiking. Yes, there are some cachers like your "criticizer" that only go for easy caches, but there are some new cachers in my area that would fit the model of the "old school" cachers. I'm sort of a hybrid of the two, in that I'll go for anything, anywhere. :laughing: That's the beauty of caching, you can hide and find what you like.

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Repeat this mantra: GeoCaching means different things to different people.

 

You can't expect drive-up-and-grab cachers to love trails.

You can't expect hikers to love power trails.

You can't expect numbers people to care about containers.

You can't expect everyone to move trackables (i.e. not keep them.)

You can't expect traders to like the profusion of non-swag caches.

You can't exepct woodsy-outdoorsy types to like Lamp Post Caches (LPCs)

You can't expect all your caches to have Likes, glowing log entries or frequent visits.

 

Acceptance is the key to enjoying the game.

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Repeat this mantra: GeoCaching means different things to different people.

 

You can't expect drive-up-and-grab cachers to love trails.

You can't expect hikers to love power trails.

You can't expect numbers people to care about containers.

You can't expect everyone to move trackables (i.e. not keep them.)

You can't expect traders to like the profusion of non-swag caches.

You can't exepct woodsy-outdoorsy types to like Lamp Post Caches (LPCs)

You can't expect all your caches to have Likes, glowing log entries or frequent visits.

 

Acceptance is the key to enjoying the game.

Exactly!!

 

That's what struck me as so odd about her comment.

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.... is hiking slowly being evolved out of caching?

 

I don't think that the hiking aspect of caching is being phased out. Now days there are so many people playing this game that the variety of caches are more plentiful. It just so happens that the more plentiful caches tend to be easier to get to(P&G types) and easier to hide. It takes a lot more effort to hide in the hills.

 

The good thing about the hiking caches is that they will out last any other cache... if a good container is used. The only way hiking caches will be evolved out is if we stop hiding them. I know most of my caches and future caches will be out on the trails. Keep..."Leading the Way" and cachers will come.

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I probably wouldn't attempt a 12 part mountaintop multi (lazy Florida flatlander here) but I don't understand the attitude of someone who complains about the fact that someone else wants to have a 12 part mountaintop multi. It's not like that multi sitting up there is going to crowd out other caches that the complainer might attempt.

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I for one like to have some challenge (real) to a cache regardless of the type. Walking or climbing for it within reason hasn't stopped me yet (occasionally a bit beyond reason). Certainly there are local reasons that some sites won't ever be really busy, around here that can be distance vs elevation change, perceived 'nasty' critters, fire threat or avalanche threat and simply being remote. That said, the whole population seems to be into that sort of experience in BC, with the exception of many urban dwellers from the big city, and many of them do desire the experience on a more controlled level. People do have to work into such adventure gradually, and that is good. I've been thinking of a multi or series type that would function as a navigational aid for people seeking some of our caches. Similar situation as far as the navigation and hike part, but most of these are on Crown Land. I just have a nagging feeling that some people want/need a way to get around unfamiliar territory. I've been here 5 or so years and am just getting comfortable with the trails and even the landmarks. I feel for someone who just pops in unprepared. There is a local tourism map that shows some trails in about the right places... adding some information to the caches (as well as a few prepared for that purpose) about how to get back to town the easiest route will maybe save us a SAR situation someday. Lots forget to mark the CAR location or how to backtrack a track set. I just haven't worked out the best way.

 

Seems I got intrigued by a puzzle somewhere that I am having trouble getting the resources to finish off solving... :rolleyes:

even if I never get to find it.

 

By all means keep doing 'old school' caches, many of us need to get out there and work a bit. At least the 'easy' crowd stay in town and by the main roads keeping themselves busy with less important things. Consider lame PnG and LPC types as decoys.

 

Doug 7rxc

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I'd say the most rewarding cache I've done, by far, was the South Kaibab to Bright Angel multi from the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. Though there was no final container, I had the time of my life on that trip and the multi gave me something to work on along the way. In my book Geocaching translates to 'Let it take you there' Clearly my destination isn't the same as your critic, but I'm totally ultra mega micro cool with that, like totally forsooth and stuff. Knowwutimean? :anibad:

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Another cache was about .3mi down a paved bike path. A cacher drove to it and got a $300 ticket. He messaged me and tried to get me to pay it because he was only there for my cache!

 

Did you remind them that it's inhale, exhale, repeat?

When I first read this I was thinking.....

 

A 1/3 of mile? My daughter walks further than that one wat to school. And yes it is uphill. :laughing:

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Another cache was about .3mi down a paved bike path. A cacher drove to it and got a $300 ticket. He messaged me and tried to get me to pay it because he was only there for my cache!

 

Did you remind them that it's inhale, exhale, repeat?

 

That's comedy gold. :lol: I don't think I've met anyone on the trail that mad. I read about stuff like that in the paper now and then (pot farmer complains to police about theft of produce, etc.) It's truly amazing how some people get as old as they do.

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...has caching changed that much over the years that a long hike is not considered a good cache anymore?

 

No caching hasn't changed that much, a long hike will still attract some number of cachers, just not many. But it wouldn't have attracted many 7 years ago, either.

 

I own a multicache that's all alone, no other caches can be found in that forest section. It's 7 years old, has 15 finds.

On the other side of the river, I own another multi, it's surrounded by traditional caches - you can find it, and a number of other hides in the same days walking. It's 2 months younger and has been found 95 times.

This find contrast has been steady since 05. Nothing much has changed.

 

I continue to contemplate my own possible cache placement(s). I know that it be found most if I build a trail of traditional caches. And that the trad closest to the main trail, where there already caches, will be found the most, and each succeeding hide will be found less and less.

 

These would hardly need to be one per tenth mile, but say 4 or 5 along the 4 mile route.

 

As a cache seeker, I'd prefer one multicache. But that's a fairly lonely place =:-) by far the commoner preference is for a string of trads.

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Wait... Crossing gator infested waterways is a bad thing?

 

You must have missed the trespass part ;-) I have a fairly high tolerance for gator infested waters, myself.

 

Though I will say that this particular spot ranks #3 on my list of intimidating gator holes. Sometimes, during low water periods, the congregations of large gators in the few remaining deep holes can resemble the stuff you see on those African wildlife specials. No need to get wet crossing the river, just step over on the gator backs, plus they're stacked up on each bank like cordwood, 10 footers side by side. I had been thinking of a wading/swimming cache on the mid-stream island, but that's not gonna happen.

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Geocaching is my fitness plan. No gym membership. No leotards. No programmable exercise bicycles. No pointless lifting of weights. No boring stair-stepping machines. Just get out there and hike. We going on a Deathmarch this weekend. I can hardly wait! :anibad:

 

Probably pick up a dozen caches along the trail and I'm hoping I'll have a couple minutes to seek out an Azimuth benchmark, which has so far eluded cachers.

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