Jump to content

What do all the acronyms mean?


ec1warc1
Followers 5

Recommended Posts

Swag really isn't an acronym, its an actual word.

My first time hearing the term was as an acronym for Scientific Wild _ _ _ Guess.

I think it was my 5th grade science teacher who used it as such. :unsure:

:laughing:

 

That's what I thought it meant. :lol:

 

 

 

Swag refers to the ornatmental drapes in a window. They are there only for decoration. From that anything extra just for decoration or show became called swag. It then began to refer to anything that people collected that served no real purpose. Hence swah in a cache.

 

..... and now you know the rest of the story.

Link to comment

Swag has been adated as a word, but the origin is in handout stuff at trade shows - S.W.A.G = Stuff We All Get

 

Actually it originated in the late 1700s or early 1800's as slang for a thief's booty and eventually came to mean any assortment of goods, and in Australia as the belongings of a hobo. Hence the "jolly swag man" in the famous Aussie Song "Waltzing Matilda" (written in the late 1800's). Unless they had trade shows where they gave out handouts back in the early 1800's, the the word predates the acronym by almost 200 years.

Edited by briansnat
Link to comment
There's a world of difference betwixt using nothing but an acronym for a log and tacking on an acronym at the end of an otherwise excellent log.
Nope, that's my point: there's no difference. A log containing nothing but "TFTC" means exactly as much as a log containing nothing but "Thanks for the cache". Sure, some loggers are being lazy, and some are being nasty, but I don't see any reason for anyone, in general, to think they mean anything less than they're saying: "Thanks for the cache."

 

I particularly don't like the idea that, because this idea is so popular here in the forums, people are routinely thinking less of some poor innocent that is just trying to be polite and simply doesn't feel qualified to go into any details about the cache or their experience. Or, for that matter, someone that just prefers to keep his thoughts to himself.

Link to comment
There's a world of difference betwixt using nothing but an acronym for a log and tacking on an acronym at the end of an otherwise excellent log.
Nope, that's my point: there's no difference. A log containing nothing but "TFTC" means exactly as much as a log containing nothing but "Thanks for the cache". Sure, some loggers are being lazy, and some are being nasty, but I don't see any reason for anyone, in general, to think they mean anything less than they're saying: "Thanks for the cache."

 

I particularly don't like the idea that, because this idea is so popular here in the forums, people are routinely thinking less of some poor innocent that is just trying to be polite and simply doesn't feel qualified to go into any details about the cache or their experience. Or, for that matter, someone that just prefers to keep his thoughts to himself.

I'm sorry but TFTC might well equal "Thanks for the Cache"

but

TFTC does not equal 2 paragraphs of unique experience + "TFTC".

Link to comment
There's a world of difference betwixt using nothing but an acronym for a log and tacking on an acronym at the end of an otherwise excellent log.
Nope, that's my point: there's no difference. A log containing nothing but "TFTC" means exactly as much as a log containing nothing but "Thanks for the cache". Sure, some loggers are being lazy, and some are being nasty, but I don't see any reason for anyone, in general, to think they mean anything less than they're saying: "Thanks for the cache."

 

I particularly don't like the idea that, because this idea is so popular here in the forums, people are routinely thinking less of some poor innocent that is just trying to be polite and simply doesn't feel qualified to go into any details about the cache or their experience. Or, for that matter, someone that just prefers to keep his thoughts to himself.

 

At one time a simple TFTC was shorthand for "your cache was so unremarkable that I couldn't think of anything else to write". That is quite a bit different from taking the time to actually write "thanks for the cache", though in practice I've rarely encountered a log where someone actually spelled out only "thanks for the cache" because if they wrote that out they usually added more to the log.

 

With the emphasis on numbers these days, where a cache is no longer an experience, but a simple +1, TFTC is no longer necessarily an insult but many old timers still see it that way.

 

I sometimes use TFTC in my logs, but only as a closing to a longer log. Used properly it is the geocaching log equivalent of "regards", "best wishes" or "sincerely".

Link to comment

Just thought I would take a moment to mention that, in my mind, the "find" log is a chance for me to do several things.

 

Primarily, I am simply logging my find. Increasing my find count and marking another cache off of my list.

 

However.

 

It is also my chance to: express thanks to the cache owner for the container/time/money effort of placing this cache. Let them know how the container is faring. Tell the story of my journey to that location. Serve as a journal for my Geocaching experiences. Log the weather and my thoughts on the location. Let future finders know what to expect. Make a log of my trade(s).

 

It seems only fitting that I should use much more than singular rapid acronyms to express even a small part of that. While some of the acronyms may well be a part of my logging - it should never be the sum of it.

 

Just me maybe....

Link to comment
I'm sorry but TFTC might well equal "Thanks for the Cache"

but

TFTC does not equal 2 paragraphs of unique experience + "TFTC".

Right. So don't complaing about "TFTC", complain about the missing paragraphs. My point is that writing out "Thanks for the Cache" in long hand doesn't make up for them.

 

Once you start complaining about the missing paragraphs, then I'll start defending people that don't write much under the banner "To Each His Own", but as long as you keep complaining specifically about "TFTC", your argument is just fatally flawed, no more logical than complaining about "Thanks for the Cache" because it should be "I thank you for the Cache".

Link to comment
There's a world of difference betwixt using nothing but an acronym for a log and tacking on an acronym at the end of an otherwise excellent log.
Nope, that's my point: there's no difference.

You may be right. Let's do a comparison.

 

Here's the log from the last cache I found:

 

Page 1 of 2:

 

VFem, AKA: Jessie, LizardSally, Vince & Janet of Flatouts, Mark, AKA: SavageHiker, as well as Mark & Peggy of The Jailbirds caved in to my continuous whining regarding what the Ocala area geocachers have consistently labeled as the best cache ever, "Urban Jungle/Fear Factor" by RREngineer.

 

Whoo Hoo!!

 

I hopped on my trusty KLR-650 bright and early, pulling into the Flatout Hacienda as The Jailbirds arrived, did a bit of schmoozing, loaded up in the Jailbird minivan, and headed northwest, driving a gazillion miles, eventually arriving at a rather mundane looking parking lot, which would prove to be the only thing about this cache which even mildly approached the ordinary.

 

I read the cache page on my bright pink iPad, (it's a manly man thing), and immediately got corrected by those who were bright enough to download the latest version of the page. Armed with the updates, we descended into the pit, beginning what would be a truly amazing adventure.

 

While I can't offer many details regarding our various hunts, for fear of letting slip unintended spoilers, by the time we located the first film can, replacing it with a Vinny custom made Tiki, (with the owner's consent), I had already decided that this was a most worthy cache. I could have DNF'd every following stage, and the final, and I would still walk away grinning like an idiot. (OK, just to clarify; for me, grinning like an idiot is a fairly easy step)

 

During our journey, we discovered a small opening at the base of a cliff, and decided to explore, finding a way kewl cave. Crawling down into Mother Earth, we also found a very agitated momma buzzard, protecting her chick. She posed for a few pictures, but was none to pleased about the prospect. The smell of angry buzzard, coupled with the scent of buzzard poo, combined to make the odor quite interesting. The temperature drop helped me cope with my rising claustrophobia, which was greatly appreciated. Shining my light around, I also what I initially thought to be some kind of metallic mineral protruding through the cave roof. Each bit of *mineral* was surrounded by roaches, which I thought was odd. A closer look revealed this shiny bits to be water beads, which had seeped through the billion or so tons of rock above our heads.

 

Eventually, those who opted to stay outside the cave grew weary of waiting for us amateur spelunkers, convincing us that it was time to return to the hunt.

 

(sigh...)

 

At another point in our quest, I opted to ignore my Garmin, and climb a crumbling cliff, which in retrospect was probably a bad idea. But it sure was a lot of fun! It brought back childhood memories of my rock climbing days with the Boy Scouts, and gave me an amazing view.

 

The greatest challenge was actually finding the containers. As a seeker, you are beset with literally hundreds of potential hiding spots at each ground zero. The difficulty is further compounded by satellite constellation issues. As most geocachers know your accuracy, at any given moment, is determined by how many satellites your device can receive data from, and where these satellites are, in relation to the world around you. If the majority of the satellites are on the horizon, you'll get less accurate readings. If most are off in one direction, your accuracy suffers. And since they are constantly moving, their constellation is constantly changing. This is why you'll see the occasional cache log complaining about coords being off. Typically, the coords are fine. It's the satellite constellation that is throwing the proverbial monkey wrench in your hunt. To make matters worse, the algorithm employed by consumer grade handhelds don't take satellite constellation into consideration when reporting the estimated position accuracy. Their device reports 10' of accuracy, so they assume it must be right.

 

to be continued;

 

Page 2 of 2;

 

So, all that is working against you, in an ideal geographic location. But when you drop yourself 60' down a hole with rock sides, all bets are off. Those satellites even remotely close to the horizon are out of play entirely. Essentially, those who are dependent upon their devices bringing them to an exact spot are screwed. When you take on this quest, expect to search areas much larger than normal. Expect your unit to swear that ground zero is right at your feet one minute, then 50' away the next minute. Get your geosense fine tuned, as that will be much more useful than your GPS. After all, this is a true 5/5, Earn it or go home. Just don't whine about bad coords.

 

I gotta say, with some degree of pride, that we earned this one. We came armed with a large group, all of whom were experienced enough to know that they would have to search larger than normal areas, and all of whom had the tenacity of Rosie O'Donnell gnawing her way out of a shipping container to get to a carton of Ben & Jerry's. When given a new set of coords, we would approach cautiously, each of us establishing our own ground zeros. As we were spread out over fairly large areas, this brought home the notion that our search areas would be large as well, and we'd dive in with gusto, not stopping till we found what we sought.

 

I offer my most humble thanks to RREngineer for creating this cache, sharing this magical place with the Geocaching community.

 

Sore, smelly, tired and grinning from ear to ear, we gathered at the heights to plan the rest of our day. Steaks at Terry's Sports Bar was definitely at the far end of the quest, but since it was still fairly early, we wanted something to fill in the gap. Preferably something other than P&Gs.

 

Sally noted a virtual nearby called "Hole In The Wall", which drew us like flys drawn to rotting lemming corpses. As a lover of virts, I threw in my vote, and off we went. The view at ground zero was no less than amazing, though it was marred slightly by a bunch of litter scattered about the caves. SavageHiker hopped the railing and did a CITO around the cave face and inside the upper right cave, then we all joined in the fray, cleaning up gobs of trash from all over the park. While up above the site, headed for a coffee cup some mook left behind, I saw the face from a different perspective, realizing that the giant rock protruding from the ground actually sheared off of the face at some point in the distant past. We saw a large koi goldfish swimming around the lower cave, which added to the kewlness of the site, as we speculated how it got there. Kudos to the owner for bringing us here!

 

We saw a multi in the same park, but a recent log mentioning wet, rancid contents turned us off, so we went after an interestingly named couple of traditionals instead. "Get Out of Jail Free" brought us to an old county jail which three of us, as former corrections officers, really appreciated. Looking in the occasional peep hole brought home how corrections has changed over the decades. The next name to catch our eye was "Freedom isn't free!". As this is a motto I preach religiously, I knew I had to go see what it was about. Of all the veterans memorial parks I've seen, I think this one really sets the standard. An awesome job by the folks who designed and built it. We also stopped off at a P&G which I don't remember, other than the fact that we all saw the container poking out of its tree hole as we turned into the parking lot. We wanted to nab one more multi, but the sun had already set, and the park which contained it had a sign declaring it closed at sunset. As we contemplated ignoring that particular rule, there was a guy near the entrance on his phone discussing buying meth. That decided us.

 

We schmoozed for a bit, then we parted ways, with us heading to Terry's for steak.

 

Mmmm...

 

Thanx for the fun!

 

-Sean

 

Post script: This log copy/pasted 'cuz I'm too dang lazy to type it three more times.

 

Now, let's compare that to this log:

 

TFTC

 

Personally, I see a difference. <_<

Link to comment

 

With the emphasis on numbers these days, where a cache is no longer an experience, but a simple +1, TFTC is no longer necessarily an insult but many old timers still see it that way.

 

 

Every cache is an experience, whether the cacher chooses to share what happened or not. For me, even with the most mundane caches, *something* interesting happened either on the way to cache or at GZ or whatever and I will write a minimum of a couple sentences, often more. I don't think I'm special in that way, however, I do choose to share my experiences, whereas many others will simply write TFTC, regardless of what happened. Some people enjoy writing, some don't.

 

The only time I write 'TFTC' is when I am thinking Thanks-For-The-Crap, which is rare. Most caches have *some* merit, usually the location if nothing else.

Edited by The_Incredibles_
Link to comment
Swag really isn't an acronym, its an actual word.

My first time hearing the term was as an acronym for Scientific Wild _ _ _ Guess.

I think it was my 5th grade science teacher who used it as such. :unsure:

 

I've never seen the "scientific" use, only "stupid."

 

Austin

Link to comment
There's a world of difference betwixt using nothing but an acronym for a log and tacking on an acronym at the end of an otherwise excellent log.
Nope, that's my point: there's no difference. A log containing nothing but "TFTC" means exactly as much as a log containing nothing but "Thanks for the cache". Sure, some loggers are being lazy, and some are being nasty, but I don't see any reason for anyone, in general, to think they mean anything less than they're saying: "Thanks for the cache."

 

Please try to understand the post you are quoting before replying. I think it is abundantly clear to many of the rest of us that in this case you did not.

 

Austin

Link to comment
Please try to understand the post you are quoting before replying. I think it is abundantly clear to many of the rest of us that in this case you did not.
OK, thanks for the advice. I'll try harder. It sure sounds like he's complaining about use of the acronym TFTC even though his logic suggests to me he'd be just as upset with "Thanks for the cache." Please help me understand what I'm missing.
Link to comment
Please try to understand the post you are quoting before replying. I think it is abundantly clear to many of the rest of us that in this case you did not.
OK, thanks for the advice. I'll try harder. It sure sounds like he's complaining about use of the acronym TFTC even though his logic suggests to me he'd be just as upset with "Thanks for the cache." Please help me understand what I'm missing.

No what was being said was (for example) there is a world of difference between:

 

"The sun was out most of the long hike to this wonderful well thought out cache. The container was well stocked and is holding up well despite the deep snows that winter brings. We stayed at the cache site to soak in the near infinite views of the surrounding terrain. The sun glinting off of the faraway lakes was enchanting. I will long remember the great time my family enjoyed as we hiked to and from this one - TFTC."

 

and

 

just plain - "TFTC"

 

There's a world of difference betwixt using nothing but an acronym for a log and tacking on an acronym at the end of an otherwise excellent log.
Link to comment

ec1warc1, the meaning of a couple acronyms change depending on how they are used.

For instance, the acronym "TFTC" translate literally to "Thanx For The Cache".

If used as spice to a well written log, the translation is accurate.

But if that acronym is the entire log, the translation changes to "Your Cache Really Sucks".

 

That's not true.

 

I sometimes cache with my wife. We each have our own accounts. I'll write up my log for the find (using the word "we" to describe what happened) and then, instead of repeat the same thing, she'll just log "TFTC".

 

Just one example, at least, of using that while not meaning to diss the cache.

 

In fact, I would rather people just post "TFTC" instead of copy/paste a long winded, yet generic, explanation about their whole trip that they put on EVERY cache they find that day - which usually has no specific info about the actual cache(s) they post about.

 

"Today we left at 6:30 AM and drove 200 miles up the coast. It was a lot of fun to see everything and find a few caches along the way. This was one of 36 that we found today" - is, IMO, a much more boring/worse log than to just say "TFTC", since it has absolutely nothing to do with the cache itself. It is especially annoying when you see the exact same log over and over again on all the caches in a certain area.

 

If you don't have anything to say about the cache, or you did too many too remember them individually, then just write "TFTC" and move along.

Edited by ZeekLTK
Link to comment

Does anyone know what the following Acronyms could be?

 

RtFTF = ?

BM = ?

HTH = (besides from "Hope this/that helps or happy to help")

GOAT = ?

JOMBWGH = ?

TFTFPC = ?

-Ready to First to find?

-Something from the bathroom, or beat me(as in he beat me there?)

 

Zombie thread-Bringing up an old thread, for example the last reply was more than a year ago, when there have been other, newer threads about the same subject, or bringing up said thread for no other reason than to bring it up again.

Link to comment

AWP = Additional Waypoint

BYOB = Bring Your Own Pen

CITO = Cache In Trash Out

DNF = Did not find

FTF = First to Find

GZ = Ground Zero

HZ = Homezone

LP = Lost Place

LPC = Lamp Post Cache

NM = Needs Maintenance

PMO = Premium Member Only

PQ = Pocket Query

SBA = Should be archived

STF = Second to Find

SWAG = Stuff we all get

TB = Travel Bug

TFTC = Thanks for the Cache

TNLN = Took Nothing Left Nothing

TTF = Third to Find

 

If there's any other you'd like to know go ahead and ask :anitongue:

There are also some that are only used in special countries. In Germany we often use DFDC (Danke für den Cache) instead of TFTC. In France it's MPLC (Merci pour la cache), etc.

Don't try to memorize them all to start. :blink: You'll use some more than others, and some you'll never use. I have never used or even seen AWP :huh: before, but it hasn't hurt me! :)

Link to comment

A couple which are used extensively here in the UK:

 

ICT: Ivy Covered Tree

MTT: Multi-Trunked Tree

 

I recently hid a cache where I thought I provided a very explicit hint:

 

"E most of 2 large MTTs. Hanging low, path side."

 

A group of new cachers didn't find it and logged they didn't understand the hint. I used the acronym to keep the hint short and I've seen "MTT" used so much I didn't give it a second thought.. but for new cachers it made no sense.

 

E means East of course...

Link to comment
I saw this used as a hint on a cache page: NKOTB

Any ideas?

NKOTB = New Kids On The Block

 

Either a reference to a disbanded teen band, or a reference to being new to the area?

As a hint, it could also be a reference to the way "NKOTB" caches are usually hidden. Perhaps it's hidden the way new cache owners usually hide caches, or perhaps it's a reference to a particular cache owner who usually hides caches in a particular way.
Link to comment

Hi, I'm new to geocaching. I've seen a post often within the Cache description. It's in french. It is PAT 1$. Can anyone help me? Thanks!

 

I saw this used as a hint on a cache page: NKOTB

Any ideas?

 

Giving the GC code of the cache in question would go a long way to helping people try to form guesses. Context can be very helpful.

 

Also, have you asked the cache owner?

 

B.

Edited by Pup Patrol
Link to comment
15 minutes ago, Sakidoo said:

What do the acronyms PWP and LWP stand for in geocaching?

Could be something local.  Since AWP stands for Additional WayPoint,   the WP may stand for Waypoint but I have no idea what the initial P and L stand for.  The only thing I can think of are P = Primary or Preliminary and L = Last.  

 

 I'd ask whoever wrote it.  Were there on a cache listing?  In an online log?

 

 

Link to comment
On 3/15/2020 at 4:56 PM, dshibshm said:

I thought bullseye caches refer to Target. Can someone confirm this?

That could be a local-to-your-area way to list a cache without mentioning the business name.

I've not seen that in the areas where I cache.

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Followers 5
×
×
  • Create New...