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GPS for bikes?


ljvet
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Hi - I am new to this. Have been at it since Feb 24 and to date I have found 29!!!

 

What I have discovered is that GeoCaching makes walking/hiking fun. I exercise often - and turned to running when walking just got too boring and time consuming. But this makes it fun! Walking for a purpose! My boys and I saw two deer in the woods last night! So this is great for them too (6, 4, 4)

 

I was thinking about biking. I used to bike alot, but again, I feel like it doesn't give me the workout that running can, and its kinda boring to do by myself.. HOWEVER - I could see myself biking all over the country side if I had a purpose!

 

However, my problem is I've been doing this on my iPad. Not so conducive for biking.

 

Can anyone recommend a gps I could add to my tools to use while riding my bike?

 

Thanks!

 

L

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Hi - I am new to this. Have been at it since Feb 24 and to date I have found 29!!!

 

What I have discovered is that GeoCaching makes walking/hiking fun. I exercise often - and turned to running when walking just got too boring and time consuming. But this makes it fun! Walking for a purpose! My boys and I saw two deer in the woods last night! So this is great for them too (6, 4, 4)

 

I was thinking about biking. I used to bike alot, but again, I feel like it doesn't give me the workout that running can, and its kinda boring to do by myself.. HOWEVER - I could see myself biking all over the country side if I had a purpose!

 

However, my problem is I've been doing this on my iPad. Not so conducive for biking.

 

Can anyone recommend a gps I could add to my tools to use while riding my bike?

 

Thanks!

 

L

 

Just about any GPS will work. A friend of mine mounts a Dakota to his handlebars using the standard Garmin mount. I used to have a 60CSx on my handlebars using a Garmin mount, now I use a Montana 650 and a RAM mount.

 

If aerodynamic efficiency is a big priority for you then a Montana probably isn't the best way to go... the serious road cyclists would use something like an Edge instead. But if you're wanting a good GPS with a nice big screen to use and you're not worried about the extra drag it works very well.

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I'm using a Garmin Oregon with a low-profile Ram handlebar mount

http://www.ram-mount.com/mount/garmin_oregon_mount.htm

 

And the OR works OK with the restricted viewing angle on handlebars? I always need to turn it so the sun angle is correct. But then again, mine's always handheld.

 

I'd suggest a GPSr that ISN'T a touch screen for bike riding. Touch screens' visibility (at least the first generation Garmins) isn't as good as their GPSMap60CSX, GPSMap62s, or Etrexs.

Edited by seldom_sn
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A RAM Mount which may be easily secured to either a bicycle handlebar or canoe thwart or similarly shaped part is the RAM Yoke Clamp Base with 1" Rubber Ball -- RAM-B-121BU -- sort of a universal handlebar/thwart grabbing thingie. A better explanation from RAM's site: 'The yoke clamp base will fit rails in diameter from 0.625" to a maximum of 1.25". The 1" rubber ball is at a right angle to the plane of the mount; when connected to a rail, the ball sits parallel to the rail. The rail does not need to be perfectly round to mount this base. 1" Rubber Ball "B" Size.'

 

Then, a double-socket arm -- RAM-B-201U1. For my GPSr, I attached a Diamond Base with 1" Ball -- RAM-B-238U -- to the back of the cradle for my Garmin 62st -- RAM-HOL-GA41U2.

 

The beautiful thing about using the double-socket arm over the more commonly seen handlebar "solution" is the infinite number of positions/angles you can achieve with just a slight loosening and re-tightening of the arm. Rock solid.

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I'm using a Garmin Oregon with a low-profile Ram handlebar mount

http://www.ram-mount.com/mount/garmin_oregon_mount.htm

 

And the OR works OK with the restricted viewing angle on handlebars? I always need to turn it so the sun angle is correct. But then again, mine's always handheld.

 

 

I typically rely upon the backlight. Over the years, I've gotten in the habit of quickly touching the screen to turn it on when viewing. That's where having a touch screen is a benefit, IMO. Using rechargeable NiMH's, I still get plenty of run time even with the backlight use.

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I'd suggest a GPSr that ISN'T a touch screen for bike riding. Touch screens' visibility (at least the first generation Garmins) isn't as good as their GPSMap60CSX, GPSMap62s, or Etrexs.

 

I found I had troubles reading an Oregon's screen even when the only light was the fluorescent light in the shop where I looked at it, which is why I never bought one.

 

When I tried out a Montana I found I could read it in just about any light. I've never had any trouble with not being able to read it on my bike. I've used it on all-day rides, circular rides, and it's performed just fine every time.

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Do the ANT+ enabled GPSs talk to ANT+ HR monitors, tire sensors, pedal sensors etc..

Pedal/wheel sensors and HR monitor both talk to my 405CX, and the HR monitor worked with my 62s and Etrex 30. Haven't gone on a ride with a handheld since I got the pedal sensors. The 405CX doesn't do power calculations, so I suspect it's not designed to read both pedal and wheel.

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Do the ANT+ enabled GPSs talk to ANT+ HR monitors, tire sensors, pedal sensors etc..

Pedal/wheel sensors and HR monitor both talk to my 405CX, and the HR monitor worked with my 62s and Etrex 30. Haven't gone on a ride with a handheld since I got the pedal sensors. The 405CX doesn't do power calculations, so I suspect it's not designed to read both pedal and wheel.

Wow. I didn't know bike computers could do power. Do they measure pedal force? When I said pedal, I was thinking pedal cadence.
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Do the ANT+ enabled GPSs talk to ANT+ HR monitors, tire sensors, pedal sensors etc..

Pedal/wheel sensors and HR monitor both talk to my 405CX, and the HR monitor worked with my 62s and Etrex 30. Haven't gone on a ride with a handheld since I got the pedal sensors. The 405CX doesn't do power calculations, so I suspect it's not designed to read both pedal and wheel.

Wow. I didn't know bike computers could do power. Do they measure pedal force? When I said pedal, I was thinking pedal cadence.

Several high end running and cycling units have this:

Power meter compatible (displays power data from compatible 3rd party ANT+™-enabled power meters): yes (records data approx. 1 per second)

I know that Training Center has a power column displayed, but it looks like these units only report the results from another expensive sensor.

See here:

http://www8.garmin.com/train-with-garmin/power-meter.html

Edited by seldom_sn
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The Etrex 30 would make quite a nice all purpose (bike and walking/geocaching) unit and can accept heart and cadence sensor input. The Garmin handlebar mount is simple and effective. The Etrex display is easy enough to read in sunlight or overcast conditions too.

Edited by RamblinBear
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