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When did geocaching become like this?


Stroover
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You know, I always said the day would come when micros are the majority cache size.

 

Come to think of it, wouldn't that turn the micro into being the "regular" cache size? I see it now... Micros are regular, nanos would be small, and then you have large, extra large and supersize :lol:

Then what would be a micro? :unsure:

a pico :yikes:

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>Just for future reference, feeding bread to birds is generally discouraged.

 

sorry about that, they did look really happy..

 

Great I see you all found a simple solution..

take what you like, filter out what you maybe dont like,

have fun, go outdoors, spend less time writing bad stuff in a forum :-)

Yes to the single mom ! great you found a way and level that match your kind of fun,

it is just great this hobby got so many levels or ways to be played,

the only problem is someone who thinks they got better skils and love to talk about it,

and neglect the joy and happyness others got on what ever level they are at.

Dont look at peoples score, dont look on your own, just play.

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take what you like, filter out what you maybe dont like,

have fun, go outdoors, spend less time writing bad stuff in a forum :-)

Yes to the single mom ! great you found a way and level that match your kind of fun,

it is just great this hobby got so many levels or ways to be played,

the only problem is someone who thinks they got better skils and love to talk about it,

and neglect the joy and happyness others got on what ever level they are at.

 

Actually, I do not think that it is that easy. Geocaching has changed dramatically since I started

with this activity back in 2002. Many of the changes that took place are to the negative with respect

to my personal preferences and needs. I do not care if additional target groups join in, but I am not happy

with the fact that the target group that has been active during the first years gets more and more kicked out of the

activity due to the changes.

 

BTW: When I visited Copenhagen in 2003 almost all caches were available in English and many logs were written in English.

The same was true at that time for my home country. Nowadays, the vast majority of caches is available only in the local language

which is a negative result of the mass development and which cannot be coped with by simpling selecting the caches one

enjoys. I am a big fan of multi caches and it is hardly possible to do those without understanding the description.

 

It is also true that the new powertrail rules brought along a dramatic change in some areas with respect to the type of caches

that are showing up there. Again this cannot be solved by a filtering process.

 

I think that there are winners and losers of the new developments. Some cachers certainly enjoy the modern geocaching world much more

than they would have enjoyed the world of the old days, but for others it is the other way round. Many of my fellow cachers from the early years

have stopped their geocaching activities due to frustration about the development that took place and went back to their activities from where they

came into geocaching (hiking, climbing, mountain-biking, canyoning etc).

 

Cezanne

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take what you like, filter out what you maybe dont like,

have fun, go outdoors, spend less time writing bad stuff in a forum :-)

Yes to the single mom ! great you found a way and level that match your kind of fun,

it is just great this hobby got so many levels or ways to be played,

the only problem is someone who thinks they got better skils and love to talk about it,

and neglect the joy and happyness others got on what ever level they are at.

 

Actually, I do not think that it is that easy. Geocaching has changed dramatically since I started

with this activity back in 2002. Many of the changes that took place are to the negative with respect

to my personal preferences and needs. I do not care if additional target groups join in, but I am not happy

with the fact that the target group that has been active during the first years gets more and more kicked out of the

activity due to the changes.

 

BTW: When I visited Copenhagen in 2003 almost all caches were available in English and many logs were written in English.

The same was true at that time for my home country. Nowadays, the vast majority of caches is available only in the local language

which is a negative result of the mass development and which cannot be coped with by simpling selecting the caches one

enjoys. I am a big fan of multi caches and it is hardly possible to do those without understanding the description.

 

It is also true that the new powertrail rules brought along a dramatic change in some areas with respect to the type of caches

that are showing up there. Again this cannot be solved by a filtering process.

 

I think that there are winners and losers of the new developments. Some cachers certainly enjoy the modern geocaching world much more

than they would have enjoyed the world of the old days, but for others it is the other way round. Many of my fellow cachers from the early years

have stopped their geocaching activities due to frustration about the development that took place and went back to their activities from where they

came into geocaching (hiking, climbing, mountain-biking, canyoning etc).

 

Cezanne

 

Ditto to your first and last paragraphs, cezanne. A lot of the early, prolific cachers have quit around here, and I got to a point where I almost didn't care anymore either. I'm fighting my way back up from that, because I do enjoy it, but filtering out what I don't like is harder and harder to do.

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It's been a few years since I've last geocached. Back then, caches were no closer then about a kilometer each, and the cache sites had something significant there to see, whether it was natural beauty, some neat geological site, of historic significance, or some neat site only the locals know about. The year I stopped, caches were becoming too close together and with nothing significant at the site. Nowadays, caches seem to be only a few douzen yards apart, and for the most part there is nothing there interesting to see, just a micro stuck in a tree in the woods. What's the point of that? Now I see why I stopped. It's a shame too, because back then caches had real significance and geocaching itself was a lot of fun to do. :(

 

Deleted comment due to message.

 

** I disagree with the poster Stroover** I would suggest the OP start hiding some caches if he does not like what others are doing.

Edited by Ash McCloud
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More and more it is becoming a chore just to sort through all the crap to find the few gems. Oh well, that's what happens when the masses take over.

 

+1

 

I blame phone apps, and more so, people telling people about caching. Stop telling others!

It used to be like a secret society, and if you talked about it, people looked at you funny.

Now they say "Oh, I've heard of that". Every Tom, Dick, and Harry has a GPS now. Chances are they look for something to do with it, besides driving around.

 

So when my wife asks me where I'm going on a Saturday morning, I'll just say "I can't tell you." Thats is going to go over real well.

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You are right about a lot of it..

I also prefer english discriptions of all caches, also in non native english locations,

this is a great help for turists..

I just cant say I am perfect my self,

not all of my own caches are written in english, sorry abou that

something that will be quite easy to fix..

I strongly suggest local approvers encurage english text, or double text at least,

how can we all get back on track ?

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Time for a new HOBBY....not a sport.

It's only a sport to those who make it a sport. What does it matter to you how other people play? Keep it a hobby. They're out there. Find them, find only the ones you want to find, whenever you want to find them. That's the hobby.

 

That's just right!!:laughing: For me, my wife and two little daughters is a very amusing and fun hobby. It's for over half a year now that we know geocaching and I'm busy with it every day.

My brains are working excessive day in, day out planning for a new cache, a new mystery. Getting the exact co-ordinates, making the specially adapted boxes and so on.:anibad:

It's fun ... it's crazy ... it's a passionated hobby. :grin:

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Would people flock to the original stash cache or mango if not they were place today, after FTF, probably not, they are rather ordinary hides as I'm sure many of the first caches were.

 

I have been on some amazing hikes to amazing places finding caches that were placed in the last year. Sure there are lots of bad caches but I'd bet there are a lot more great caches than there were 4 or 5 years ago, you just have to find the one's you like and if you can't then it's time to quit caching.

 

You kinda remind me of Abe Simpson, I wonder if there is a name for thinking everything was better in the past.

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Would people flock to the original stash cache or mango if not they were place today, after FTF, probably not, they are rather ordinary hides as I'm sure many of the first caches were.

Mmmm....mangoes.... :wub:

 

I would not travel to Kansas for a mango, blech.

So right! I've had fresh ripe mangoes in Belize and in Australia. I am forever spoiled. :unsure:

Edited by Ambrosia
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Would people flock to the original stash cache or mango if not they were place today, after FTF, probably not, they are rather ordinary hides as I'm sure many of the first caches were.

Mmmm....mangoes.... :wub:

 

I would not travel to Kansas for a mango, blech.

So right! I've had fresh ripe mangoes in Belize and in Australia. I am forever spoiled. :unsure:

 

Grrrrrr iPad, auto correct:(

 

 

You kinda remind me of Abe Simpson, I wonder if there is a name for thinking everything was better in the past.

I think rosy retrospection may be what you are looking for. If you are looking for something a little more medical sounding you can call it memoria praeteritorum bonorum.

 

Yes, that sounds right, in fact Midnight in Paris was based on this perception.

Edited by Roman!
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Would people flock to the original stash cache or mango if not they were place today, after FTF, probably not, they are rather ordinary hides as I'm sure many of the first caches were.

Mmmm....mangoes.... :wub:

 

I would not travel to Kansas for a mango, blech.

So right! I've had fresh ripe mangoes in Belize and in Australia. I am forever spoiled. :unsure:

 

Grrrrrr iPad, auto correct:(

Hey, it's all good...I'm not going to complain that you made me think about mangoes. :wub:

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in the old days it was a serious matter to goto the top of everest,

today you book it online, just pay and go there like disney park,

next year they install elevators for the fat and sick.

 

You cant be the first on everest, or the first on the moon,

so what do you want ?

Be the first not to complain :-)

that will be something..

Edited by OZ2CPU
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Would people flock to the original stash cache or mango if not they were place today, after FTF, probably not, they are rather ordinary hides as I'm sure many of the first caches were.

 

Geocaching has developped differently in different areas of this world. Among the first caches in my area there are many of my all time favourite ones.

This has been the first multi cache in my area

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?guid=517708a6-8187-49de-b4c9-9fbc84736bfd

and nowadays hardly any caches of that calibre are hidden.

Nowadays people hide 35 traditionals and ruin for me the experience of a unique hike.

 

Sure there are lots of bad caches but I'd bet there are a lot more great caches than there were 4 or 5 years ago, you just have to find the one's you like and if you can't then it's time to quit caching.

 

The issue for me is not about good and bad, but about appealing to me. It is definitely not true that today there are more caches I enjoy in my area than 5 years ago. It is the other way round.

Among the caches I enjoy there are certainly caches that most people would not regard as good (I care about the hike and e.g. not about whether the container is tight, and I am glad if the hideout is apparent already from 10m apart - I do not like at all creative hideouts). Likewise in my area there are many caches that many would refer to as good - creative hides, specially crafted boxes, but at boring urban locations and reachable by drive-in.

Among the pioneers in my area most cachers were mainly interested into hiking, enjoying the nature etc - finding a box at the end was just the bonus, not the main thing. This has changed a lot as the main focus of the community shifted a lot.

 

You kinda remind me of Abe Simpson, I wonder if there is a name for thinking everything was better in the past.

 

That's much too simplistic. I already explained that the situation back then was better for some and worse for others.

It depends on the person and the reasons why this person is interested into geocaching.

 

Cezanne

Edited by cezanne
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More and more it is becoming a chore just to sort through all the crap to find the few gems. Oh well, that's what happens when the masses take over.

 

+1

 

I blame phone apps, and more so, people telling people about caching. Stop telling others!

It used to be like a secret society, and if you talked about it, people looked at you funny.

Now they say "Oh, I've heard of that". Every Tom, Dick, and Harry has a GPS now. Chances are they look for something to do with it, besides driving around.

 

More so than phone apps, I blame the ubiquitous use of auto navigations GPS units. As I see it, those that were using handheld GPS devices had a perception that a GPS was something to use lieu of a compass and map (or to augment using a compass). People don't generally think of using a compass in urban areas, but rather in the woods where there is plenty of room for an ammo can. When auto-navigation GPS devices came along, the perception of a GPS was that it's a device that provides driving directions, thus because Geocaching is based on using a GPS, the geocaches should be placed in spots that one can drive to (and that the GPS will provide driving directions to the cache). As a result, a lot of caches ended up in parking lots and on guard rails near roads where it was difficult to place anything bigger than a micro.

Edited by NYPaddleCacher
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More and more it is becoming a chore just to sort through all the crap to find the few gems. Oh well, that's what happens when the masses take over.

 

+1

 

I blame phone apps, and more so, people telling people about caching. Stop telling others!

It used to be like a secret society, and if you talked about it, people looked at you funny.

Now they say "Oh, I've heard of that". Every Tom, Dick, and Harry has a GPS now. Chances are they look for something to do with it, besides driving around.

 

More so than phone apps, I blame the ubiquitous use of auto navigations GPS units. As I see it, those that were using handheld GPS devices had a perception that a GPS was something to use lieu of a compass and map (or to augment using a compass). People don't generally think of using a compass in urban areas, but rather in the woods where there is plenty of room for an ammo can. When auto-navigation GPS devices came along, the perception of a GPS was that it's a device that provides driving directions, thus because Geocaching is based on using a GPS, the geocaches should be placed in spots that one can drive to (and that the GPS will provide driving directions to the cache). As a result, a lot of caches ended up in parking lots and on guard rails near roads where it was difficult to place anything bigger than a micro.

 

Except I'm sure Planet agrees that one poster after her is allowed to tell his wife he's going Geocaching on a Saturday morning. :laughing:

 

I can't remember the year, but I'm going to say around 2008. Tom-Tom's and Nuvi's seemed to be having a price war, and every Tom, Dick or Harry could get a car GPS for $100. I remember my neighbor had a $700 Magellan car GPS in like 2005. :blink: We absolutely did see an astronomical rise in "use your Nuvi to find Geocaches" newbies. This wasn't difficult to figure out; they'd mention it in their logs. (Note they didn't log every cache with "TFTC", they were forced to use computers). The forums were abuzz with questions about caching with car GPS's. Some guy from the UK even wrote a GSAK macro to put cache data in a Nuvi. By the way, his name came up a month or two ago, and I looked and the guy was basically inactive, and lost interest in caching. :o

 

Do I think the car GPS revolution led to more parking lot caches? Meh, not really.

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Some guy from the UK even wrote a GSAK macro to put cache data in a Nuvi. By the way, his name came up a month or two ago, and I looked and the guy was basically inactive, and lost interest in caching.

I wouldn't read TOO much into this, he was never what most of us would call an "active" cacher... his busiest year he averaged under 7 caches per month.

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Some guy from the UK even wrote a GSAK macro to put cache data in a Nuvi. By the way, his name came up a month or two ago, and I looked and the guy was basically inactive, and lost interest in caching.

I wouldn't read TOO much into this, he was never what most of us would call an "active" cacher... his busiest year he averaged under 7 caches per month.

 

OK, I'd better do that. Especially if he hears he was mentioned in the forums, and comes here and flames me. :ph34r: But let there be no doubt there was a find caches with your car GPS revolution preceeding the find caches with your cell phone revolution.

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Do I think the car GPS revolution led to more parking lot caches? Meh, not really.

 

Perhaps not, but if someone assumes that the purpose of a GPS is to provide driving directions, and then finds out Geocaching is something one can do with a GPS, it's seems fairly plausible that they'd assume that Geocaches are found (and hidden) at places where one can drive (or more accurately, park) and pretty much implies a parking lot, or at least a parking spot on the side of the road. Add to that all the times we've answer auto-navigation user questions with "you need to switch to pedestrian mode", it's not a stretch to consider the possibility that a lot of people came into the game with the assumption that geocaching was primarily an urban game, which often dictates that a smaller container is used.

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It's been a few years since I've last geocached. Back then, caches were no closer then about a kilometer each, and the cache sites had something significant there to see, whether it was natural beauty, some neat geological site, of historic significance, or some neat site only the locals know about. The year I stopped, caches were becoming too close together and with nothing significant at the site. Nowadays, caches seem to be only a few douzen yards apart, and for the most part there is nothing there interesting to see, just a micro stuck in a tree in the woods. What's the point of that? Now I see why I stopped. It's a shame too, because back then caches had real significance and geocaching itself was a lot of fun to do. :(

 

Yeah there is a preponderance of micros hidden in state parks around here where I'd like to place some regular sized and unique caches.. we shall see what happens! :) Still plenty of room. Still I think hiding all those tiny plastic micros does more harm than good to the hobby. People find them and they may think the hobby is silly if that's all they find... especially since good state parks and other scenic areas are at a premium where I live. I think the person in question should tone it down a bit.. they've literally placed hundreds. I will make up for it by placing mostly regulars and trying to think up some creative containers as well. :) Good to have some variety.

Edited by sholomar
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I know how you feel. I am not interested so much in urban caches but love bush caches where you may only find 1 along a track all day but it takes you to a spot that you would not normally go but are now happy you went.

Thats why most of our caching has been done away from home on holidays. My advise choose a nice location you would like to visit and do a search for the type of cache you like.

Good luck and hang in there.

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I'm weird because I don't, overall, mind micros, even urban ones. Sometimes I get tired of them because there sure are a lot of them these days. But what I do is try to find something interesting/pretty/cool etc. about the area the cache led me to. Even in the middle of the city, I often find little side streets or tucked away parks or such things that I never knew were there. Or I just see a pretty flower garden nearby, or find a store I didn't know about across the street, or whatever. Then I can go write a good log about what I saw or did. I guess I just try to make every cache as special as possible, regardless of how good or difficult the cache itself is. I don't always succeed at this...I've had my share of rather dull finds that just counted for another find and that's all. But I try to see the beauty in the world, and in the caches, around me. :)

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