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TotemLake

Hike Of The Month 2012

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Next scheduled date is January 21.

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Do we have a rough idea as to what the cache will be or maybe a couple to choose from? I think that we should start this year's first HOTM off on a high note as it was one of my New Year's Resolutions to attend at least four of the HOTMs this year. Looking forward to it TL!

 

-CK

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This month will be a promised snowshoe 101. I'm still toying with location and cache(s) that won't tax beginners too much and not be the same location as the last two years.

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So, I take it, that Halfway to Kendal Peak is out? :laughing:

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So, I take it, that Halfway to Kendal Peak is out? :laughing:

:P For January anyway. I may have called Uncle, but I like the idea of pecking away at this till I make it. Afterall, it only took me 5 years to get back around and conquer Skyline after tweaking my back on it in snowshoes.

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I'm officially lurking on the new thread now. Can't make the January trip, but hope to get out with the group sometime. Have fun.

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I recall on one of the HOMs we discussed trekking poles and how much better the cam-lock ones are than the twist locks. Anyway, SteepandCheap.com has been moving some Black Diamond poles, all with the cam locks. They're running about ~50% or so off. I picked up some Trail Shocks for $50, and they're up right now as I type this. They've had several models up at various times over the last few days.

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Next scheduled date is January 21.

I'm in!

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I'm planning on hitting a familiar trail.

 

Beginner's snowshoe hike on an easy railroad grade with good terrain on either side to learn your new snowshoeing skills. This is a good time to ask questions and try techniques such as picking yourself up in soft snow or handling steep descents and ascents.

 

At the west portal of the original Cascade Tunnel under Stevens Pass. The location is infamous for being the site of the March 1, 1910 Wellington (later renamed to Tye) avalanche, the worst avalanche in United States history, in which 96 people died. This is one of the most easily ignored snow locations and features amazing scenery.

 

The full hike in is about 3.3 miles and will bring you to the entrance of the only fully concrete avalanche shed in North America. That will be just a little over 6.5 miles round trip but you don't have to go the full length to enjoy this hike.

 

Meet up at 8:30 at the trailhead to start the hike at 9:00 AM; coordinates and directions are below:

 

N47° 44.7716'

W121° 5.5346'

 

Approaching Stevens Pass Ski Lodge from the West side, the left turn is just at the variable speed limit sign just before extended parking lot entrance on the right.

 

Approaching the turn off from the East side of Stevens Pass; when you see the overhead skywalk, the right turn is just past the variable speed sign.

 

Speed limit is at 35MPH through here and the turn off is in about 8 inches of snow as of Saturday, 1/7. Follow the road all the way down to the snow berm next to the snow analisys lab... about 0.11 mile or 600 feet.

 

Oh yah, for the first time ever, my wife will be joining us on this HOTM.

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Oooops haven't posted in here in so long forgot how to delete my mistake

Edited by Patudles
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Have never snowshoed but wanted to. Maybe this is my opportunity to go for it. Don't know if have endurance for that long though. Seriously thinking of giving it a try though if you will have patience with me.

Edited by Patudles
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You don't have to go the distance, and I will have patience. Just ask Flutey and Tee. And IF I don't display it, my wife will surely let me have it across the back of the head. :)

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You don't have to go the distance, and I will have patience. Just ask Flutey and Tee. And IF I don't display it, my wife will surely let me have it across the back of the head. :)

That alone is worth the price of admission!

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Now I REALLY wish I was going. :anibad::ph34r:

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You don't have to go the distance, and I will have patience. Just ask Flutey and Tee. And IF I don't display it, my wife will surely let me have it across the back of the head. :)

That alone is worth the price of admission!

Definitely! I'm with Ambrosia - now I wish I could go, just to see Mrs. TotemLake keeping him in line! :lol:

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Have never snowshoed but wanted to. Maybe this is my opportunity to go for it. Don't know if have endurance for that long though. Seriously thinking of giving it a try though if you will have patience with me.

 

He's got patience!

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You don't have to go the distance, and I will have patience. Just ask Flutey and Tee. And IF I don't display it, my wife will surely let me have it across the back of the head. :)

Logbear and I are in for this, once again. I'll make sure those two caches are findable, no matter what. Also, I've got a personal score to settle. Besides, why would I want to miss fireworks? I'll bring a plastic bag for an ice pack. :bad:

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Okay, a couple of questions... First, what kind of time frame are we looking at from begining to end? And second, what do you suggest I wear for this occasion, I know to dress in layers, but do I need snow pants and gators or will something else suffice???

 

Thanks in advance!

 

CK

Edited by CACHE KRAWLER
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Okay, a couple of questions... First, what kind of time frame are we looking at from begining to end? And second, what do you suggest I wear for this occasion, I know to dress in layers, but do I need snow pants and gators or will something else suffice???

 

Thanks in advance!

 

CK

Because we'll have mixed skill sets, this can be an all day thing, but I like to be back at the trailhead before sundown. If you've never snowshoed, the best speed you can hope to do is about 2MPH, but average is more like 1MPH in this kind of hiking scenario.

 

Clothing depends subjectively to the person and should be based on how cold the weather is predicted to be as well as how soft and fresh is the snow you'll be hiking through. (We have wet snow here.) I can tell you what I do and wear. I carry my snowpants in the car in the event the weather is 25F or lower or if it is raining. I figure If I have it, I can put it on, but if I don't... Modern thermals keep me pretty warm even when wet, and I typically wear gaiters to keep the snow out of the boots, although last month I went without. But then, I have pretty good winter hiking boots anyway. Carry spare gloves in your backpack. They make for a nice swap out at the turn around point. I carry three weights of gloves, from lightweight windbreakers to near artic gloves. Glove warmers can help. Have something to protect the ears and even the face if it is windy. I carry a full head balaclava for this. An absolute must is sunglasses that cover as much of the eye socket as possible. Snow blindness is real if the sun comes out.

 

After the hike, have a spare set of socks and dry shoes to slip into. Your feet will almost verbally thank you. I also carry a dry fleece sweater to slip on when I take my usually soaked jacket and shirt off. You'll find yourself warming up much quicker after a long cold hike.

 

I hope I answered your questions.

Edited by TotemLake
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I would add, have a complete change of clothes in the car. Depending on weather and distance of the drive home, you will be more comfortable in all dry clothes.

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Okay, a couple of questions... First, what kind of time frame are we looking at from begining to end? And second, what do you suggest I wear for this occasion, I know to dress in layers, but do I need snow pants and gators or will something else suffice???

 

CK

 

Lots of thin layers is better than a couple of thick layers. This way it's easier to make adjustments in clothing to prevent getting too hot or too cold.

 

When snowshoeing, you can get warm quickly. It's more strenuous than just hiking.

 

When dressing, remember the old saying "Cotton Kills!" Leave the jeans at home.

Edited by GrnXnham
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Okay, a couple of questions... First, what kind of time frame are we looking at from begining to end? And second, what do you suggest I wear for this occasion, I know to dress in layers, but do I need snow pants and gators or will something else suffice???

 

Thanks in advance!

 

CK

Because we'll have mixed skill sets, this can be an all day thing, but I like to be back at the trailhead before sundown. If you've never snowshoed, the best speed you can hope to do is about 2MPH, but average is more like 1MPH in this kind of hiking scenario.

 

Clothing depends subjectively to the person and should be based on how cold the weather is predicted to be as well as how soft and fresh is the snow you'll be hiking through. (We have wet snow here.) I can tell you what I do and wear. I carry my snowpants in the car in the event the weather is 25F or lower or if it is raining. I figure If I have it, I can put it on, but if I don't... Modern thermals keep me pretty warm even when wet, and I typically wear gaiters to keep the snow out of the boots, although last month I went without. But then, I have pretty good winter hiking boots anyway. Carry spare gloves in your backpack. They make for a nice swap out at the turn around point. I carry three weights of gloves, from lightweight windbreakers to near artic gloves. Glove warmers can help. Have something to protect the ears and even the face if it is windy. I carry a full head balaclava for this. An absolute must is sunglasses that cover as much of the eye socket as possible. Snow blindness is real if the sun comes out.

 

After the hike, have a spare set of socks and dry shoes to slip into. Your feet will almost verbally thank you. I also carry a dry fleece sweater to slip on when I take my usually soaked jacket and shirt off. You'll find yourself warming up much quicker after a long cold hike.

 

I hope I answered your questions.

 

I would add, have a complete change of clothes in the car. Depending on weather and distance of the drive home, you will be more comfortable in all dry clothes.

 

Okay, a couple of questions... First, what kind of time frame are we looking at from begining to end? And second, what do you suggest I wear for this occasion, I know to dress in layers, but do I need snow pants and gators or will something else suffice???

 

CK

 

Lots of thin layers is better than a couple of thick layers. This way it's easier to make adjustments in clothing to prevent getting too hot or too cold.

 

When snowshoeing, you can get warm quickly. It's more strenuous than just hiking.

 

When dressing, remember the old saying "Cotton Kills!" Leave the jeans at home.

 

Outing myself as a long time lurker to this thread...

 

Good answers / info though I think he was more specifically referring to protection of his boots and pants from snow aka soon to be thawed water aka wetness and I then read between the lines that these clothes would need to be acquired if necessary.

 

Gaiters are a very good idea if the snow as any softeness or depth to it. And even then, the snowshoes tend to kick up snow from the back with each step which can work it's way into the top of the boot.

 

Rain / snow pants are a choice I make based on many considerations. One is the temperature and what I'm wearing underneath; basically if it's too cold, and my body heat well contained, the snow will not melt on any type of fabric. If it's warm enough, figure similar conditions to rain, especially if snowing. Also, the snow type and depth as noted above for gaiters. And the type of activity, if I will be playing in the snow, or glissading etc then waterproof is a very good idea.

 

Personally I often don't wear waterproof / snow pants opting just for my regular hiking pants. Gaiters are a good help and recommended, and can be put to good use during summer months as well. I've also done deep snow without gaiters, or snow shoes for that matter, you just have to be willing to put up with the wetness. All this considers that warmth is not an issue, that is, being dressed to say warm even if wet. I do always carry with me a smaller piece of an old closed cell foam pad to sit on during breaks to keep my backside from getting wet and cold; the backpack also works just fine for that.

 

Also, and you probably already know this, a big consideration is that you will likely sweat aka rain on the inside so you will end up wet no matter what anyway...

 

Hope between all of use you got the answers you were looking for :)

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Personally I often don't wear waterproof / snow pants opting just for my regular hiking pants. Gaiters are a good help and recommended, and can be put to good use during summer months as well. I've also done deep snow without gaiters, or snow shoes for that matter, you just have to be willing to put up with the wetness. All this considers that warmth is not an issue, that is, being dressed to say warm even if wet. I do always carry with me a smaller piece of an old closed cell foam pad to sit on during breaks to keep my backside from getting wet and cold; the backpack also works just fine for that.

 

Also, and you probably already know this, a big consideration is that you will likely sweat aka rain on the inside so you will end up wet no matter what anyway...

 

Hope between all of use you got the answers you were looking for :)

Good advise here too.

 

Shaddow, I may have cried Uncle, but your cache is still on my must reach in snowshoes list. I will not be beaten... merely delayed.

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Personally I often don't wear waterproof / snow pants opting just for my regular hiking pants. Gaiters are a good help and recommended, and can be put to good use during summer months as well. I've also done deep snow without gaiters, or snow shoes for that matter, you just have to be willing to put up with the wetness. All this considers that warmth is not an issue, that is, being dressed to say warm even if wet. I do always carry with me a smaller piece of an old closed cell foam pad to sit on during breaks to keep my backside from getting wet and cold; the backpack also works just fine for that.

 

Also, and you probably already know this, a big consideration is that you will likely sweat aka rain on the inside so you will end up wet no matter what anyway...

 

Hope between all of use you got the answers you were looking for :)

Good advise here too.

 

Shaddow, I may have cried Uncle, but your cache is still on my must reach in snowshoes list. I will not be beaten... merely delayed.

 

I'm glad to hear that, I want to see you make it.

 

I think you can avoid the lower avy chutes plenty well going up the valley trail, no need probably to take the steep lower part of that trail but via the PCT and just drop down and cross the stream and stay on the west side of it at the chutes. That whole valley in there is awesome for snowshoeing, once there.

 

Or if you're up for some off trail, then a modification off Ruck's route up the Coal Creek valley should work fairly well, though maybe a more advanced snowshoe then I think you like to do for the HOTM. I can tell you from personal experience that there is no good winter snowshoe route directly to the ridge from the PCT trailhead, it could be done but the steepness is such that crampons would be better.

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Well, my email is dead for some freaky reason but I can do items within the form.

 

One great thing to do if you want to adapt to the weather especially winter.

 

DO NOT TURN ON THE HEATER!!!

 

Turn that beast off 30 minutes or more before arrival, let your vehicle become cold.

 

Once you park and set out, you will be close to the outside temperature and you body will adjust accordingly & easily.

 

I have done this @@ years and I have not a problem. I've even done this with my Scout Troop and the boys learned quickly that a heated vehicle prior to a hike or Winter campout was a bad idea but great afterward when heading home.

 

This is just an idea you can try or ignore. I prefer Winter outings than the hot Summers. As several others have said... Layers, Layers and Layers is the answer to keep you going.

 

Sorry, I cannot go as too many issues currently in my life. Hope everyone has a great time and the team returns safely. :rolleyes:

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We are going to have some good snow next Saturday!

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We heard TL was doing an impromptu Snowshow 101 in the Safeway parking lot today. Sounds like there was a big crowd for it, too.

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Okay, I am watching the weather. If the pass isn't to messy I will try to be there. If it is not a good day for driving over I may just have to give it a go closer to home.

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Be ready for a last minute change of venue... likely Granite Falls area. Avalanche danger is as high as I've ever seen it... and well... we are talking about Wellington and snowsheds.

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Logbear says, "Good call!" We were just talking about this today.

 

Some thoughts:

  • Up the Mountain Loop Highway, the gate is closed just past Deer Creek, but parking tends to be plentiful there, and there is room to turn around at the gate.
  • It's about 2.25 miles from the gate to the picnic area at the Big 4 Ice Caves parking, with maybe 200' of elevation gain. From there, there are plenty of possibilities, including the boardwalk loop, further up the road towards Barlow Pass, and/or ??? Oh, and there are some caches if they aren't frozen. I even know where some of them are.
  • We could meet at the Granite Falls Red Apple grocery store at whatever time, and pool up from there.

Anyway, we're a bit more comfortable with this idea, given the current and predicted conditions.

Edited by FluteFace
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Count me out to far away and don't want to go over Stevens. We finally received some snow last night continuing on today. Think I will find a place close to home and give it a try. Have fun.

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Count me out to far away and don't want to go over Stevens. We finally received some snow last night continuing on today. Think I will find a place close to home and give it a try. Have fun.

Yah sorry about that, Patudles. Hope you have fun!

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Meet up at 8:30 at the Granite Falls Red Apple grocery store to pool up and drive to the trailhead.

 

Coordinates and driving directions to

Red Apple Grocery

115 N Granite Ave,

Granite Falls, WA 98252

 

N48° 5.0481'

W121° 58.1425'

From Hwy 9 iTurn onto WA-92 W.

Enter next roundabout and take the 1st exit onto WA-92 E/GRANITE FALLS HWY.

Turn LEFT onto N GRANITE AVE.

Arrive at Red Apple Grocery on 115 N Granite Ave, Granite Falls, WA 98252

 

To the gate/trailhead at the geocache the

Plow Stops Here

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?guid=6c1625b6-58e8-4cd2-abdc-bf61d315c9ed

N 48° 05.109

W 121° 32.764

 

from Red Apple turn left on N Granite Ave

Turn left onto SR 92 (E Stanley St)

Turn left onto Mountain Loop Hwy

Continue thrugh Silverton to the gate (about 1 mile past)

Total trip from Red Apple about 23.7 miles.

 

This is a very scenic drive to the road closure where we'll start our hike but it will be slippery so be careful.

Edited by TotemLake
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Consider me tentative for this one - schedule looks good so far and as long as that holds, I'd love to do a bit of hiking!

 

-Krauss-McClurg

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I can't get out of here (flooding) and looks like the drive north is not too good (ice). The stars are against me and the HOTM. this is not the first natural disaster to keep me away.

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Piggybacking on TL's thread to say that the Pokey Plodders have an easy (of course!) snowshoe hike planned for February 18. Beginners welcome!

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Yesterday's PP hike was awesome. The downpour we drove in was nothing but snowfall the entire hike in and out.

 

Next hike is Mt Bake for those of you who haven't attempted (and for those wanting to visit again) Grumblecache IV: Caching Through the Snow

 

I'll be at the trailhead on Sauturday, the 25th at 9AM. This starts in ski territory but it is a backcountry hike so if the avalanche risk is too high, there will be a backup plan in place for the general area.

 

Trailhead is at

N48° 51.6909'

W121° 40.9589'

 

Parking fills up quickly there.

Edited by TotemLake
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It's looking like a party of 3. My daughter and her BF are joining me.

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It's looking like a party of 3. My daughter and her BF are joining me.

I was thinking about doing this hike again but I came down with the crud this week so I'm out.

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Bummer. Would have enjoyed your company.

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Contemplating this one since it is up here on my mountain. Oh, also I own that cache. There is suppose to be 13 inches new today and even more tonight. Just something to keep in mind.

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