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100 finds in 1 day?


omadarlin-etc.
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What does, "IBTL" mean?

 

 

I could be wrong, but I think it means "In Between The Lines."

 

Although I'm told that in Scotland it stands for "Injustice By The Law."

 

In this case it means someone stepped over the line and the mods may be using an industrial cleaner in the very near future. :unsure:

 

ibtl

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My record day is somewhere around 70. It might be 70, I'm not sure.

 

I used to go out with one friend and we used to pick a cache rich area and clean it out.

It was pretty tiring.

 

Lately I've been into low numbers. I've had a much better time.

Last weekend I found ONE cache.

 

Last weekend I went with a group of people into a old mine shaft WAY up in the mountains miles down a dirt road. There was a new cache at the mine. We walked through the entire mine while one guy gave us the entire history of the mine and all the information on each piece of mining equipment we found in the mine.

Then we went to another old mining site (no caches) then we went to a really nice waterfall (again, no caches).

Really had a blast. It was a lot more fun than 10 of those numbers runs combined.

scroll down to see my log

 

A few weeks ago I found 3 caches on one day.

That was one of the best times I have ever had geocaching.

log for cache

 

I planned a numbers run with my friend again recently and then canceled on her.

There are too many good caches that take all day.

I don't have time for number runs.

 

I'd probably enjoy caching with you. We tried to do the numbers thing but it just isn't us. Rushing from parking lot to parking lot after the next in a long line of LPCs and guardrails just bored the hell out of us. The thought of stopping every tenth of a mile for hundreds of miles just boggles my mind.

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My record day is somewhere around 70. It might be 70, I'm not sure.

 

I used to go out with one friend and we used to pick a cache rich area and clean it out.

It was pretty tiring.

 

Lately I've been into low numbers. I've had a much better time.

Last weekend I found ONE cache.

 

Last weekend I went with a group of people into a old mine shaft WAY up in the mountains miles down a dirt road. There was a new cache at the mine. We walked through the entire mine while one guy gave us the entire history of the mine and all the information on each piece of mining equipment we found in the mine.

Then we went to another old mining site (no caches) then we went to a really nice waterfall (again, no caches).

Really had a blast. It was a lot more fun than 10 of those numbers runs combined.

scroll down to see my log

 

A few weeks ago I found 3 caches on one day.

That was one of the best times I have ever had geocaching.

log for cache

 

I planned a numbers run with my friend again recently and then canceled on her.

There are too many good caches that take all day.

I don't have time for number runs.

 

I'd probably enjoy caching with you. We tried to do the numbers thing but it just isn't us. Rushing from parking lot to parking lot after the next in a long line of LPCs and guardrails just bored the hell out of us. The thought of stopping every tenth of a mile for hundreds of miles just boggles my mind.

Can I come along, too? My record is 12 good caches in interesting parks with my good buddy just enjoying the day.

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What does, "IBTL" mean?

 

 

:lol:

 

Just kidding!

I had more fun looking that up than laughing at the cat fight going on here.

 

Glad to hear that. Also glad to hear that at least one cat has decided to retract his claws. I'd sure like to see the other one do that, too, but I'm not holding my breath.

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My record day is somewhere around 70. It might be 70, I'm not sure.

 

I used to go out with one friend and we used to pick a cache rich area and clean it out.

It was pretty tiring.

 

Lately I've been into low numbers. I've had a much better time.

Last weekend I found ONE cache.

 

Last weekend I went with a group of people into a old mine shaft WAY up in the mountains miles down a dirt road. There was a new cache at the mine. We walked through the entire mine while one guy gave us the entire history of the mine and all the information on each piece of mining equipment we found in the mine.

Then we went to another old mining site (no caches) then we went to a really nice waterfall (again, no caches).

Really had a blast. It was a lot more fun than 10 of those numbers runs combined.

scroll down to see my log

 

A few weeks ago I found 3 caches on one day.

That was one of the best times I have ever had geocaching.

log for cache

 

I planned a numbers run with my friend again recently and then canceled on her.

There are too many good caches that take all day.

I don't have time for number runs.

 

I'd probably enjoy caching with you. We tried to do the numbers thing but it just isn't us. Rushing from parking lot to parking lot after the next in a long line of LPCs and guardrails just bored the hell out of us. The thought of stopping every tenth of a mile for hundreds of miles just boggles my mind.

 

Wow! I was so caught up in the drama that I didn't take the time to read SS's thread very well at all.

 

I will admit to being conflicted... I do like to watch the find count rise... if for no other reason than that the more I find, the more likely I am to find a special cache... but that does sound like a great day! I remember hiking up to an old gold mine in the Black Hills a few years ago. I could have found a couple of dozen caches in the time it took me, but I would not have remembered any of them. I do, however, remember the flakes of mica the size of my hand, exploring the decaying old mill, poking my head into the adits. Finding the ammo can was almost anti-climactic.

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63 finds on 05. Sep. 2011

 

1271 finds on 05. Nov. 2010

I worship your massive amount of finds. You are a god on earth. I mean, I used to think the same about almolgul, but he doesn't brag about finding 1200 film cans a day like you! In fact, I've never seen you with a post where you didn't brag! You truly deserve a geocaching award!

 

You forgot to capitalize "Alamogul".

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What does, "IBTL" mean?

 

 

:lol:

 

Just kidding!

I had more fun looking that up than laughing at the cat fight going on here.

 

Glad to hear that. Also glad to hear that at least one cat has decided to retract his claws. I'd sure like to see the other one do that, too, but I'm not holding my breath.

 

Oh, he's probably over at Rebecca Black's Youtube channel saying mean things. :ph34r:

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Okay, I will admit it, I am new but...

 

I have seen some stats that are beyond my comprehension. If you do the math, as an example, one-hundred finds in a fifteen hour day (900 minutes) non-stop equals one find every nine minutes. How is that possible? But, more importantly, WHY, if it is not all about the numbers. Are we having fun yet?

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I think the most challenging thing for me was not leaving copy and paste logs after my caching binge. I was tired and very tempted to be lazy.

 

There were only so many that I took notes on, so I got off topic pretty quickly. And it took me several hours to get all those logs done, so the longer I was at it, the more my mind tended to drift.

 

Reaction to a cold call from a car dealership

 

Facts about our cats

 

What did our cat just knock over?

 

What our cat does when he's in trouble

 

From my spam filter

 

Now playing on the ipod

 

And the last "fact from a random Wikipedia article" log went south pretty quick.

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I think the most challenging thing for me was not leaving copy and paste logs after my caching binge. I was tired and very tempted to be lazy.

 

There were only so many that I took notes on, so I got off topic pretty quickly. And it took me several hours to get all those logs done, so the longer I was at it, the more my mind tended to drift.

 

Reaction to a cold call from a car dealership

 

Facts about our cats

 

What did our cat just knock over?

 

What our cat does when he's in trouble

 

From my spam filter

 

Now playing on the ipod

 

And the last "fact from a random Wikipedia article" log went south pretty quick.

 

Drift!! lol you certainly did. That made me laugh, wonder what the Co thought. I'd bet they would rather have had the laugh than a TFTC or Copy and Paste multiple times.

Edited by THE REAL BOUDICA
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Okay, I will admit it, I am new but...

 

I have seen some stats that are beyond my comprehension. If you do the math, as an example, one-hundred finds in a fifteen hour day (900 minutes) non-stop equals one find every nine minutes. How is that possible? But, more importantly, WHY, if it is not all about the numbers. Are we having fun yet?

 

During my 106 record day, we completed it in less than 6 hours. That's about 17 an hour and very possible while riding a bike and finding caches every 528'.

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It's quite easy to grab ONE cache per MINUTE, when they are all on the side of a road, visable as you approach, and only 528 feet apart.

 

I know that seems crazy....but I'm not gonna discuss why anyone would want to do it.......it is quite easy to grab 50 or 60 per hour.

So....60 per hour and 10 hours of daylight = a bunch of finds.

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I think I found 13 in one day and that wiped me out. I salute those of you who find more.

 

It depends on what you are doing. I have found three in a day and wondered if I was going to physically make it back to my car. I have also found 50 in an hour and stopped because I was bored.

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Short answer is as stated, power trail. We got a group together and our record is 109. Stud Mill Road in Maine. Caches average .7 miles apart. Lots of fun with group of friends. We started at 4am and finished at 7pm. Record on this road is proably about 165 which is about the total number of caches on this loop.

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My best is 111 finds in about 12 hours. Not all were close together, but there were stretches of a dozen or so every 528' a few times.

 

Cache density matters. There are tactics that you can employ to maximize the find count as others have suggested. Have found over 100 solo several times in a single calendar day. It's more fun to do it with geocaching friends: memorable days with a partner or multiple geocachers (one vehicle) are 205 (126 series), 251 (CA Central Valley). two consecutive five hundred plus days (ET Highway I), 626 (TOTG), 831 (Route 66), and 1,564 on 4 September 2011 (ET Highway Part II).

 

Still enjoy just finding one per day or doing a long scenic hike with family and friends; power caching is just a different way to geocache. It is an endurance challenge and if you pick challenging terrain like the Trail of The Gods, then you really are completely exhausted at the end.

 

The great thing about geocaching is there is so much variation in the way the game is played, it can be appealing to just about anyone. Setting personal goals and then achieving them does provide a sense of accomplishment. It's your time on this beautiful scenic earth, and you get to decide how best to spend it, whether geocaching or not.

 

It's all good ... when you let it be. :)

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63 finds on 05. Sep. 2011

 

1271 finds on 05. Nov. 2010

I worship your massive amount of finds. You are a god on earth. I mean, I used to think the same about almolgul, but he doesn't brag about finding 1200 film cans a day like you! In fact, I've never seen you with a post where you didn't brag! You truly deserve a geocaching award!

 

Well come to think of it, I haven't either. Oh well, Qous Scrpti Scripti.

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The density and difficulty of an area dictates the find rate. We consider any day with over 40 finds as a 'good day' of geocaching.

 

+1. In my area, any day with over 20 finds would be a good day, but only if one measures a good day of geocaching by the number of finds. 20 a day find rates aren't going to last very long because the number of new caches being placed is far less than that so the measure of a good day of geocaching, for me, might be to find to find 1-3 really good caches. I had a "good day" of Geocaching on Saturday when I DNFd on two caches before finding just one cache. But it was in Brussels, Belgium and I had never found a cache in Belgium before.

 

BTW, I read Ken Jenning's new book (Mapheads) on the flight over and back and you (ventura_kids) were mentioned a few times in the chapter on Geocaching in the context finding a lot of caches in a day. Several other forum regulars were mentioned as well in various contexts. I thought the chapter was very well written and covered the "everyone can play the game differently" aspect quite well. When describing the international aspect and how caches are located in some significant locations around the world he mentioned three specific caches; one at the Colosseum in Rome, one at Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe, and on at Angkor Wat in Cambodia. While I didn't get named specifically, I did feel a sense of accomplishment that I have found two out of the three.

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I don't understand how people can claim finds for caches they have never seen. I have looked at some of the logs for the ET Highway. At first I thought they were just ridiculous. Then I spoke to someone who had recently finished the ET power trail. Apparently many cachers get together and each one will do one section of the trail. All are armed with stickers that represent each cacher in the group. If you have a big enough group you only have to do a fraction of the caches but still take credit for finding all of the caches on the trail. So, when you see people posting such big numbers, remember they not only never saw all the caches, they may not have ever even been within fifty miles of the cache they claim to have found. What it amounts to is, some will do anything to add to their numbers even if it means logging finds on caches they haven't done. I don't know why they don't just stay home and log finds on caches all over the world. That way they could become the number one cacher in the world without ever having to leave the comfort of home.

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I don't understand how people can claim finds for caches they have never seen. I have looked at some of the logs for the ET Highway. At first I thought they were just ridiculous. Then I spoke to someone who had recently finished the ET power trail. Apparently many cachers get together and each one will do one section of the trail. All are armed with stickers that represent each cacher in the group. If you have a big enough group you only have to do a fraction of the caches but still take credit for finding all of the caches on the trail. So, when you see people posting such big numbers, remember they not only never saw all the caches, they may not have ever even been within fifty miles of the cache they claim to have found. What it amounts to is, some will do anything to add to their numbers even if it means logging finds on caches they haven't done. I don't know why they don't just stay home and log finds on caches all over the world. That way they could become the number one cacher in the world without ever having to leave the comfort of home.

Well, you have an ally in me but you're beating a dead horse with this issue. It's been raised many times but tends to fall on deaf ears, as in "none so deaf as though that will not hear". Anyway, "concern yourself with your caches and don't worry about others", not my quote but one you can expect to see.

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I don't understand how people can claim finds for caches they have never seen. I have looked at some of the logs for the ET Highway. At first I thought they were just ridiculous. Then I spoke to someone who had recently finished the ET power trail. Apparently many cachers get together and each one will do one section of the trail. All are armed with stickers that represent each cacher in the group. If you have a big enough group you only have to do a fraction of the caches but still take credit for finding all of the caches on the trail. So, when you see people posting such big numbers, remember they not only never saw all the caches, they may not have ever even been within fifty miles of the cache they claim to have found. What it amounts to is, some will do anything to add to their numbers even if it means logging finds on caches they haven't done. I don't know why they don't just stay home and log finds on caches all over the world. That way they could become the number one cacher in the world without ever having to leave the comfort of home.

Well, you have an ally in me but you're beating a dead horse with this issue. It's been raised many times but tends to fall on deaf ears, as in "none so deaf as though that will not hear". Anyway, "concern yourself with your caches and don't worry about others", not my quote but one you can expect to see.

You are right. We cache as though those with the bogus numbers don't exist. It's like those that bilk people out of their money and then brag about how much money they have. Some day all will be made right even if they don't think so.

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Apparently many cachers get together and each one will do one section of the trail. All are armed with stickers that represent each cacher in the group. If you have a big enough group you only have to do a fraction of the caches but still take credit for finding all of the caches on the trail. So, when you see people posting such big numbers, remember they not only never saw all the caches, they may not have ever even been within fifty miles of the cache they claim to have found.
Yes, some people who do the big numbers run trails use this divide-and-conquer technique, or its cousin, the leapfrogging technique. But not all of them do. Some teams actually find all the caches without splitting up into sub-teams. Some even find all the caches and replace them where they found them, rather than using the swap-and-drop technique.
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So, when you see people posting such big numbers, remember they not only never saw all the caches, they may not have ever even been within fifty miles of the cache they claim to have found.

 

This statement is unfair to those that *do* visit and "sign" the log on every cache. While there are many that do power trails do so with a group of caches and some will employ some "creative" practices in an attempt to achieve high numbers, it's unfair to assume that *all* those that do power trails will employ those practices. I read the logs of one cacher that did the trail solo and still managed to rack up 800 or so finds.

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So, when you see people posting such big numbers, remember they not only never saw all the caches, they may not have ever even been within fifty miles of the cache they claim to have found.

 

This statement is unfair to those that *do* visit and "sign" the log on every cache. While there are many that do power trails do so with a group of caches and some will employ some "creative" practices in an attempt to achieve high numbers, it's unfair to assume that *all* those that do power trails will employ those practices. I read the logs of one cacher that did the trail solo and still managed to rack up 800 or so finds.

I'm sorry, I should have said when any cacher claims to have done 1000 caches in a single day, he did not do all the caches by himself. To get to the point of this thread, it is possible to do 100 power trail caches in a day. We have done it once but we won't do it again. It was very boring with the wife driving and me jumping out of the car every 500 feet. In Petoskey Michigan there are two power trails, one with 100 caches and one with 200. We did the 100 plus one of the 200. Never again will we waste our time running after pointless numbers.

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I should have said when any cacher claims to have done 1000 caches in a single day, he did not do all the caches by himself.

 

alamogul got 917 in one day, signed them all himself. Someone else may have been driving, I don't know if that meets your definition of "by himself" or if it's enough that he wasn't team-finding.

 

With a catheter and a case of Red Bull, I bet he could have done 1K. :anibad:

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I don't understand how people can claim finds for caches they have never seen. I have looked at some of the logs for the ET Highway. At first I thought they were just ridiculous. Then I spoke to someone who had recently finished the ET power trail. Apparently many cachers get together and each one will do one section of the trail. All are armed with stickers that represent each cacher in the group. If you have a big enough group you only have to do a fraction of the caches but still take credit for finding all of the caches on the trail. So, when you see people posting such big numbers, remember they not only never saw all the caches, they may not have ever even been within fifty miles of the cache they claim to have found. What it amounts to is, some will do anything to add to their numbers even if it means logging finds on caches they haven't done. I don't know why they don't just stay home and log finds on caches all over the world. That way they could become the number one cacher in the world without ever having to leave the comfort of home.

 

I don't get that either, but you are painting all of the power trail cachers with a broad brush. There are many people who have done the ET trail without using those cheesy methods and some of them have racked up 1,000+ in 24 hours legitimately.

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I'm sorry, I should have said when any cacher claims to have done 1000 caches in a single day, he did not do all the caches by himself.
I don't think I've heard of anyone finding 1000+ caches in a 24-hour day solo, but I've heard of people finding 700+ caches in a 24-hour day solo.

 

But so what? Why does it matter whether anyone found a cache solo, or with a group? I've found plenty of caches as part of a group. Sometimes I don't even touch the cache. Sometimes, I don't touch the cache even when I'm the first person to spot it. That's what happens on group caching trips, even when you're playing Huckle Buckle Beanstalk style.

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So, when I posted this I was on vacation with my family ... and promptly forgot I had posted at all.

 

First, thanks so much for the information. I'm not really interested in power caching, but at least I understand more about how it is possible. Your collective wisdom has inspired me to do even more caching ... although not necessarily in a power manner.

 

Secondly, I especially appreciate those who gave good advice and encouragement without getting nasty. Good grief. For a minute there I thought the posts were from Jr. High kids. "I know you are but what am I?"

 

My personal best happened later in that same vacation: 6 in one day on Pelee Island (Lake Erie). Three were earth caches (two requiring significant hikes and various stages), three others were part of a multi, also requiring quite a bit of hiking (mostly beaches and virgin forest). I was EXHAUSTED! There are 7 caches on the island, but we found the other the day before our marathon day. It is fun, now, to look at the island and know I have found all of the caches there.

 

So now I will take the advice of nymphnsatyr and make my next "power goal" 11 in one day. What do you know ... 11-11-11 is coming up. Might have to be an alday event!

 

Blessings,

omadarlin

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I don't understand how people can claim finds for caches they have never seen. I have looked at some of the logs for the ET Highway. At first I thought they were just ridiculous. Then I spoke to someone who had recently finished the ET power trail. Apparently many cachers get together and each one will do one section of the trail. All are armed with stickers that represent each cacher in the group. If you have a big enough group you only have to do a fraction of the caches but still take credit for finding all of the caches on the trail. So, when you see people posting such big numbers, remember they not only never saw all the caches, they may not have ever even been within fifty miles of the cache they claim to have found. What it amounts to is, some will do anything to add to their numbers even if it means logging finds on caches they haven't done. I don't know why they don't just stay home and log finds on caches all over the world. That way they could become the number one cacher in the world without ever having to leave the comfort of home.

 

I don't get that either, but you are painting all of the power trail cachers with a broad brush. There are many people who have done the ET trail without using those cheesy methods and some of them have racked up 1,000+ in 24 hours legitimately.

There are 1440 minutes in a 24 hour period. To do 1000 caches in a 24 hour period means doing one cache every 1.44 minutes. I guess I'm a doubting Thomas. I do not believe it is possible. But then, I don't believe in Santa Claus or the Tooth Fairy.

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I don't understand how people can claim finds for caches they have never seen. I have looked at some of the logs for the ET Highway. At first I thought they were just ridiculous. Then I spoke to someone who had recently finished the ET power trail. Apparently many cachers get together and each one will do one section of the trail. All are armed with stickers that represent each cacher in the group. If you have a big enough group you only have to do a fraction of the caches but still take credit for finding all of the caches on the trail. So, when you see people posting such big numbers, remember they not only never saw all the caches, they may not have ever even been within fifty miles of the cache they claim to have found. What it amounts to is, some will do anything to add to their numbers even if it means logging finds on caches they haven't done. I don't know why they don't just stay home and log finds on caches all over the world. That way they could become the number one cacher in the world without ever having to leave the comfort of home.

 

That is one reason why, ironically, power trails actually make the number of finds less meaningful, rather than moreso, continuing to prove that it really is not all about the numbers.

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I don't understand how people can claim finds for caches they have never seen. I have looked at some of the logs for the ET Highway. At first I thought they were just ridiculous. Then I spoke to someone who had recently finished the ET power trail. Apparently many cachers get together and each one will do one section of the trail. All are armed with stickers that represent each cacher in the group. If you have a big enough group you only have to do a fraction of the caches but still take credit for finding all of the caches on the trail. So, when you see people posting such big numbers, remember they not only never saw all the caches, they may not have ever even been within fifty miles of the cache they claim to have found. What it amounts to is, some will do anything to add to their numbers even if it means logging finds on caches they haven't done. I don't know why they don't just stay home and log finds on caches all over the world. That way they could become the number one cacher in the world without ever having to leave the comfort of home.

 

I don't get that either, but you are painting all of the power trail cachers with a broad brush. There are many people who have done the ET trail without using those cheesy methods and some of them have racked up 1,000+ in 24 hours legitimately.

There are 1440 minutes in a 24 hour period. To do 1000 caches in a 24 hour period means doing one cache every 1.44 minutes. I guess I'm a doubting Thomas. I do not believe it is possible. But then, I don't believe in Santa Claus or the Tooth Fairy.

You really should believe in Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy. 1.44 minutes per cache is a bit slow.

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I don't understand how people can claim finds for caches they have never seen. I have looked at some of the logs for the ET Highway. At first I thought they were just ridiculous. Then I spoke to someone who had recently finished the ET power trail. Apparently many cachers get together and each one will do one section of the trail. All are armed with stickers that represent each cacher in the group. If you have a big enough group you only have to do a fraction of the caches but still take credit for finding all of the caches on the trail. So, when you see people posting such big numbers, remember they not only never saw all the caches, they may not have ever even been within fifty miles of the cache they claim to have found. What it amounts to is, some will do anything to add to their numbers even if it means logging finds on caches they haven't done. I don't know why they don't just stay home and log finds on caches all over the world. That way they could become the number one cacher in the world without ever having to leave the comfort of home.

 

I don't get that either, but you are painting all of the power trail cachers with a broad brush. There are many people who have done the ET trail without using those cheesy methods and some of them have racked up 1,000+ in 24 hours legitimately.

There are 1440 minutes in a 24 hour period. To do 1000 caches in a 24 hour period means doing one cache every 1.44 minutes. I guess I'm a doubting Thomas. I do not believe it is possible. But then, I don't believe in Santa Claus or the Tooth Fairy.

You really should believe in Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy. 1.44 minutes per cache is a bit slow.

 

It all depends on how one defines "To do 1000 caches in a 24 hour period", or more specifically "to do a cache". For some that means an individual locates and retrieves a container, signs the log sheet, and replaces the container at the spot in which it was retrieved. For others, "to do a cache" can mean many other things.

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There are 1440 minutes in a 24 hour period. To do 1000 caches in a 24 hour period means doing one cache every 1.44 minutes. I guess I'm a doubting Thomas. I do not believe it is possible. But then, I don't believe in Santa Claus or the Tooth Fairy.

You might want to check out the video that appeared in Post #14 of this thread.

 

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I don't understand how people can claim finds for caches they have never seen. I have looked at some of the logs for the ET Highway. At first I thought they were just ridiculous. Then I spoke to someone who had recently finished the ET power trail. Apparently many cachers get together and each one will do one section of the trail. All are armed with stickers that represent each cacher in the group. If you have a big enough group you only have to do a fraction of the caches but still take credit for finding all of the caches on the trail. So, when you see people posting such big numbers, remember they not only never saw all the caches, they may not have ever even been within fifty miles of the cache they claim to have found. What it amounts to is, some will do anything to add to their numbers even if it means logging finds on caches they haven't done. I don't know why they don't just stay home and log finds on caches all over the world. That way they could become the number one cacher in the world without ever having to leave the comfort of home.

 

I don't get that either, but you are painting all of the power trail cachers with a broad brush. There are many people who have done the ET trail without using those cheesy methods and some of them have racked up 1,000+ in 24 hours legitimately.

There are 1440 minutes in a 24 hour period. To do 1000 caches in a 24 hour period means doing one cache every 1.44 minutes. I guess I'm a doubting Thomas. I do not believe it is possible. But then, I don't believe in Santa Claus or the Tooth Fairy.

 

Here's a easy 100 cache run with some nice scenery

100 Cache Run Hemet

I think we did about 98 that day and we didn't rush

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My record is for a powertrail with 4 people in one car = 877 ET and other caches (oh I did most of the running by the way).

For a non powertrail 183 in Southern Cal

For my first time trying for a personal best solo, using no PQs, no auto-routing and manually entering back in '06 was 51. In a non familiar area. No maps either. Just print outs with hand written routing.

Edited by jellis
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I don't understand how people can claim finds for caches they have never seen. I have looked at some of the logs for the ET Highway. At first I thought they were just ridiculous. Then I spoke to someone who had recently finished the ET power trail. Apparently many cachers get together and each one will do one section of the trail. All are armed with stickers that represent each cacher in the group. If you have a big enough group you only have to do a fraction of the caches but still take credit for finding all of the caches on the trail. So, when you see people posting such big numbers, remember they not only never saw all the caches, they may not have ever even been within fifty miles of the cache they claim to have found. What it amounts to is, some will do anything to add to their numbers even if it means logging finds on caches they haven't done. I don't know why they don't just stay home and log finds on caches all over the world. That way they could become the number one cacher in the world without ever having to leave the comfort of home.

 

I don't get that either, but you are painting all of the power trail cachers with a broad brush. There are many people who have done the ET trail without using those cheesy methods and some of them have racked up 1,000+ in 24 hours legitimately.

There are 1440 minutes in a 24 hour period. To do 1000 caches in a 24 hour period means doing one cache every 1.44 minutes. I guess I'm a doubting Thomas. I do not believe it is possible. But then, I don't believe in Santa Claus or the Tooth Fairy.

 

It's possible because it has been done. Never underestimate geocachers. One cache every 1.44 minutes can easily be accomplished on a power trail like the ET highway. If you look at some of the power trail videos on Youtube they are finding caches at much faster rate than that. Sometimes closer to one a minute. All you need is plenty of coffee, extra gas and an incredible ability to endure monotony.

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I just ran a speed caching trail this Sunday. My tally for the day = 139. The trail runs along the C&D Canal in Delaware and the caches are about .10 mile apart and they are placed along both the North and South sides. It was a great experience with my Hubby and a good friend. While 100+ days aren't my normal caching routine, I truly enjoyed my day.

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161 on 04/03/2009; I worked on the Geocoin Hwy, Wishbone, NO and CLUE series

113 on 01/31/2009; I worked on the Tarot card series in a big rig

I did these all by myself no assistance

53 on 09/30/2011 I worked about 1/2 of the witches brew series. I was with another cacher as we co ftf half of the series.

Edited by TK7464
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There are 1440 minutes in a 24 hour period. To do 1000 caches in a 24 hour period means doing one cache every 1.44 minutes. I guess I'm a doubting Thomas. I do not believe it is possible. But then, I don't believe in Santa Claus or the Tooth Fairy.

You might want to check out the video that appeared in Post #14 of this thread.

 

 

If you check out one of the related videos you get to see the cacher bring the container to the car with him... and not put it back.:blink::surprise:

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