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Lodge Pole

OT: GPS Obsolescence question

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About how long is a GPS on the market, before it is replaced with a new model?

 

I am looking for a used GPS, and have never before used one. All I want it for is geocaching.

 

It would be nice if it wasn't so out of date, updates can't happen, like it is with Windows 98.

 

Maybe that idea won't matter, but i don't know it won't. Thats an example.

 

I am assuming GPS need to be updated too. Perhaps they don't.

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About how long is a GPS on the market, before it is replaced with a new model?

 

I am looking for a used GPS, and have never before used one. All I want it for is geocaching.

 

It would be nice if it wasn't so out of date, updates can't happen, like it is with Windows 98.

 

Maybe that idea won't matter, but i don't know it won't. Thats an example.

 

I am assuming GPS need to be updated too. Perhaps they don't.

A GPS will break before it's "Too Old" for caching. The newer ones have better features, but sometime I still cache with my "Garmin GPS12" and that came out around 1998.

 

Remember, more features means more things that can break. My 8 year old Etrex and my 12+ year old GPS12 work great, my 3 year old 60CSx is almost unusable.

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Thanks for the reply. There are so many makes and models, and the names and numbers of them is all meaningless to a total newbie with 0 experience.

 

Reading this room, searching the GPS names, many are no longer made, hence my question. I know this isn't the correct room for this, but this is where the older GPS units are shown most clearly. I am trying to determine what a basic GPS is and have no need for every bell and whistel there is. Not when I don't know which end is up.

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The real matter is using what you have in a manner suitable to the unit you have. I run into people who insist on using an old one like a brand new state of the art device and are totally frustrated. I used an even older Garmin 45xl (now a spare), we helped a person recently get that one sorted out and they are very happily caching. Do not take that as recommending to get one though!

The 12 mentioned was the next generation and works even better. There are many GPSrs that do the basic job well.

 

Starting now, as you are, watch for a few features for sure... WAAS definitely, High sensitivity receiver should have, distance scales that read down to yard/metres or even feet ( the 45 will only go down to 0.01 km or 10m), I like to be able to configure the screen the way I want. That means showing for sure... distance and bearing to destination, and if available accuracy/EPE. That on the non compass compass display page. A track page or map page is nice... useful when you forget where you left the car.

 

Other people use it differently, but that is a good set of choices. Something like the lower end Garmins will do that much, even my 45xl (I sometimes have to cycle through pages on that one). But if you can find the data you need somewhere it will work for caching.

 

I think that you can still get the Map60cx / csx models even as new... I did that, they work like a train. H version Legends and Vistas do well also.

 

Doug 7rxc

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The biggest question you need to answer before someone can make an honest recommendation is how much money are you willing to spend? You can get many of the older (yet still working fine for geocaching) for $40 or so and up. If you have some extra money and want more bells and whistles then you can look for sales for some of the models just being replaced by a newer model. Cabelas has a Vista HCX bundle, regular price $349 going on sale this week for $199 ( http://www.cabelas.com/product/Garmin174-etrex-Vista-HCX-GPS-Bundle/708153.uts ) They also have the Etrex H model on sale for $75

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Ray, I would like a used gps that does Geocaching for 100 bucks or less, since it will be my first. For me to spend more with out knowing what i am doing, would be the work of a bloomin fool. I have days where I do wonder if I am indeed a bloomin fool. What I do here is see an offer, and copy/paste it to google to try and understand what the offer is. That gets me a brief view of the item as new, and a price as it was new. That is all I know to do currently.

 

7RXC, I don't have a clue as to what 'WAAS ' means. (Think this guy is stupid, and you will have it.) I have no unit to use in any mannor, and that is a good part of the problem. I have nothing to base any judgements on what so ever.

 

I have a good enough head i won't loose my car, no matter where I leave it though. The only time I have ever been lost was leaving Fla with no real idea of where i wanted to go and ended up in Oklahoma. That was after crossing the USA from my home of NH to Cal, and leaving Cal for Fla.

 

I just made one wrong turn. :D

 

Well once I pasted NY state I was plain lost, since I had never been west before. I figure with the coords, a good map, ruler, pencil and compass I could do this geocaching, but it would take a lot my time than I have left on Earth. A GPS with a pointer and telling me distance in yards, first, or meters 2nd would be a real good thing.

 

I found 3 by hapstance, then with my Bro In Law found several of the 6 we found. I play at tracking game animals, so reading a man made trail to a hidden prize at this season in NH is childs play. Some of the hides are rather clever in hollowed trees however.

 

I hope the mods will allow this discussion, as I don't know anyone with in 1,200 miles of me that is willing to help.

 

One way to look at me, is like clay waiting to be molded.

 

Thank you both for the replies.

 

On edit: got WAAS figured. " Wide Area Augmentation System" Thank you for that lesson.

Edited by Lodge Pole

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Thanks for the reply. There are so many makes and models, and the names and numbers of them is all meaningless to a total newbie with 0 experience.

 

Reading this room, searching the GPS names, many are no longer made, hence my question. I know this isn't the correct room for this, but this is where the older GPS units are shown most clearly. I am trying to determine what a basic GPS is and have no need for every bell and whistel there is. Not when I don't know which end is up.

 

A lot of GPS units are cheap because they are no longer made. So technically they are discontinued, but they actually work just as well as they ever did. It's only very slightly like buying a PC where you can keep your old Windows 98 PC running forever but new software doesn't work with it. If you had something like (say) a Garmin Geko (a very basic and now dated unit) you could still find all but a small number of new geocaches with it - it doesn't play Wherigo cartridges and doesn't support Chirp but aside from that it still works.

 

Newer GPS units give you a faster satellite lock and hold the lock under tree cover. Higher end units will give you more features (electronic compass, barometric pressure, paperless caching etc).

 

I've got an old Geko 201 that I bought in about 2004 that still works just as well as it did when I brought it home. It doesn't support mapping and it tends to drop the satellite lock under heavy tree cover.

 

My old Garmin 60CS that I bought about the same time. It has an electronic compass and barometric pressure meter, supports mapping, street-level routing (if the map contains routing data) etc. It too tends to drop the satellite lock under heavy tree cover, and like the Geko it works just as well as the day I bought it.

 

My Garmin 60CSx dates back to early 2006, has a high sensitivity chipset so you can take it through the forest and it won't drop satellite cover. It takes a memory card which means I can store far more track logs (like a digital trail of crumbs showing where I've been) then the 60CS, and also lets me put larger map sections on it. It's showing cosmetic signs of age (some of the buttons are worn where I've used them so many times) but still works perfectly. It's still the unit I use for day-to-day caching.

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Thanks for the reply. There are so many makes and models, and the names and numbers of them is all meaningless to a total newbie with 0 experience.

 

Reading this room, searching the GPS names, many are no longer made, hence my question. I know this isn't the correct room for this, but this is where the older GPS units are shown most clearly. I am trying to determine what a basic GPS is and have no need for every bell and whistel there is. Not when I don't know which end is up.

 

A lot of GPS units are cheap because they are no longer made. So technically they are discontinued, but they actually work just as well as they ever did. It's only very slightly like buying a PC where you can keep your old Windows 98 PC running forever but new software doesn't work with it. If you had something like (say) a Garmin Geko (a very basic and now dated unit) you could still find all but a small number of new geocaches with it - it doesn't play Wherigo cartridges and doesn't support Chirp but aside from that it still works.

 

Newer GPS units give you a faster satellite lock and hold the lock under tree cover. Higher end units will give you more features (electronic compass, barometric pressure, paperless caching etc).

 

I've got an old Geko 201 that I bought in about 2004 that still works just as well as it did when I brought it home. It doesn't support mapping and it tends to drop the satellite lock under heavy tree cover.

 

My old Garmin 60CS that I bought about the same time. It has an electronic compass and barometric pressure meter, supports mapping, street-level routing (if the map contains routing data) etc. It too tends to drop the satellite lock under heavy tree cover, and like the Geko it works just as well as the day I bought it.

 

My Garmin 60CSx dates back to early 2006, has a high sensitivity chipset so you can take it through the forest and it won't drop satellite cover. It takes a memory card which means I can store far more track logs (like a digital trail of crumbs showing where I've been) then the 60CS, and also lets me put larger map sections on it. It's showing cosmetic signs of age (some of the buttons are worn where I've used them so many times) but still works perfectly. It's still the unit I use for day-to-day caching.

 

Thanks for the info. On another thread I am looking at/for the OP Alex to come back, from asking the worth of his Garmin Map 60c, and hope to buy it.

 

Can you comment on if that GPS will work in tree cover? NH sure has trees.

 

I read about Wherigo cartridges, but not yet about Chirp. I tend to learn best doing, and starting at the bottom, so first getting my mitts on a gps, then finding basic easy caches is my first step.

 

I know all about worn buttons, as the keys on this key board are missing most vowels, and several other letters from wear and tear. It's what I do :rolleyes:

Edited by Lodge Pole

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Thanks for the reply. There are so many makes and models, and the names and numbers of them is all meaningless to a total newbie with 0 experience.

 

Reading this room, searching the GPS names, many are no longer made, hence my question. I know this isn't the correct room for this, but this is where the older GPS units are shown most clearly. I am trying to determine what a basic GPS is and have no need for every bell and whistel there is. Not when I don't know which end is up.

 

A lot of GPS units are cheap because they are no longer made. So technically they are discontinued, but they actually work just as well as they ever did. It's only very slightly like buying a PC where you can keep your old Windows 98 PC running forever but new software doesn't work with it. If you had something like (say) a Garmin Geko (a very basic and now dated unit) you could still find all but a small number of new geocaches with it - it doesn't play Wherigo cartridges and doesn't support Chirp but aside from that it still works.

 

Newer GPS units give you a faster satellite lock and hold the lock under tree cover. Higher end units will give you more features (electronic compass, barometric pressure, paperless caching etc).

 

I've got an old Geko 201 that I bought in about 2004 that still works just as well as it did when I brought it home. It doesn't support mapping and it tends to drop the satellite lock under heavy tree cover.

 

My old Garmin 60CS that I bought about the same time. It has an electronic compass and barometric pressure meter, supports mapping, street-level routing (if the map contains routing data) etc. It too tends to drop the satellite lock under heavy tree cover, and like the Geko it works just as well as the day I bought it.

 

My Garmin 60CSx dates back to early 2006, has a high sensitivity chipset so you can take it through the forest and it won't drop satellite cover. It takes a memory card which means I can store far more track logs (like a digital trail of crumbs showing where I've been) then the 60CS, and also lets me put larger map sections on it. It's showing cosmetic signs of age (some of the buttons are worn where I've used them so many times) but still works perfectly. It's still the unit I use for day-to-day caching.

 

Thanks for the info. On another thread I am looking at/for the OP Alex to come back, from asking the worth of his Garmin Map 60c, and hope to buy it.

 

Can you comment on if that GPS will work in tree cover? NH sure has trees.

 

I read about Wherigo cartridges, but not yet about Chirp. I tend to learn best doing, and starting at the bottom, so first getting my mitts on a gps, then finding basic easy caches is my first step.

 

I know all about worn buttons, as the keys on this key board are missing most vowels, and several other letters from wear and tear. It's what I do :rolleyes:

 

If it's a 60C then the chances are it will drop satellite lock under tree cover. It will be much the same as my old 60CS but without the electronic compass and barometric pressure sensor. If it's a 60Cx then it will hold its lock much better (it will be like my 60CSx but again without the sensors). I've been caching with both the 60CSx and 60CS at the same time and although the CSx never dropped its lock at all the CS was often struggling under tree cover.

 

Wherigo cartriges can be fun but none of the 60-series units support them. I don't think the 62-series (which replaced the 60 series) support them either. If you've got a smartphone then you get Wherigo players for the iPhone, Android, Windoze etc. I've seen the Android and Windoze versions and they seem to work just fine.

 

I still think of Chirp as a solution desperately looking for a problem but apparently there are a few good Chirp caches out there. If you get a Colorado or Oregon unit they support Wherigo, I think you'd need an Oregon to support Wherigo and Chirp.

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Thanks for the reply. There are so many makes and models, and the names and numbers of them is all meaningless to a total newbie with 0 experience.

 

Reading this room, searching the GPS names, many are no longer made, hence my question. I know this isn't the correct room for this, but this is where the older GPS units are shown most clearly. I am trying to determine what a basic GPS is and have no need for every bell and whistel there is. Not when I don't know which end is up.

 

A lot of GPS units are cheap because they are no longer made. So technically they are discontinued, but they actually work just as well as they ever did. It's only very slightly like buying a PC where you can keep your old Windows 98 PC running forever but new software doesn't work with it. If you had something like (say) a Garmin Geko (a very basic and now dated unit) you could still find all but a small number of new geocaches with it - it doesn't play Wherigo cartridges and doesn't support Chirp but aside from that it still works.

 

Newer GPS units give you a faster satellite lock and hold the lock under tree cover. Higher end units will give you more features (electronic compass, barometric pressure, paperless caching etc).

 

I've got an old Geko 201 that I bought in about 2004 that still works just as well as it did when I brought it home. It doesn't support mapping and it tends to drop the satellite lock under heavy tree cover.

 

My old Garmin 60CS that I bought about the same time. It has an electronic compass and barometric pressure meter, supports mapping, street-level routing (if the map contains routing data) etc. It too tends to drop the satellite lock under heavy tree cover, and like the Geko it works just as well as the day I bought it.

 

My Garmin 60CSx dates back to early 2006, has a high sensitivity chipset so you can take it through the forest and it won't drop satellite cover. It takes a memory card which means I can store far more track logs (like a digital trail of crumbs showing where I've been) then the 60CS, and also lets me put larger map sections on it. It's showing cosmetic signs of age (some of the buttons are worn where I've used them so many times) but still works perfectly. It's still the unit I use for day-to-day caching.

 

Thanks for the info. On another thread I am looking at/for the OP Alex to come back, from asking the worth of his Garmin Map 60c, and hope to buy it.

 

Can you comment on if that GPS will work in tree cover? NH sure has trees.

 

I read about Wherigo cartridges, but not yet about Chirp. I tend to learn best doing, and starting at the bottom, so first getting my mitts on a gps, then finding basic easy caches is my first step.

 

I know all about worn buttons, as the keys on this key board are missing most vowels, and several other letters from wear and tear. It's what I do :rolleyes:

 

If it's a 60C then the chances are it will drop satellite lock under tree cover. It will be much the same as my old 60CS but without the electronic compass and barometric pressure sensor. If it's a 60Cx then it will hold its lock much better (it will be like my 60CSx but again without the sensors). I've been caching with both the 60CSx and 60CS at the same time and although the CSx never dropped its lock at all the CS was often struggling under tree cover.

 

Wherigo cartriges can be fun but none of the 60-series units support them. I don't think the 62-series (which replaced the 60 series) support them either. If you've got a smartphone then you get Wherigo players for the iPhone, Android, Windoze etc. I've seen the Android and Windoze versions and they seem to work just fine.

 

I still think of Chirp as a solution desperately looking for a problem but apparently there are a few good Chirp caches out there. If you get a Colorado or Oregon unit they support Wherigo, I think you'd need an Oregon to support Wherigo and Chirp.

 

I was wondering what all the letters were. Is it possible to create a lite list, that would be ok for a newbie?

 

I think I would like a gps, that worked in the moutains of NH since I live in them, and thar's trees alrighty everywhere. I don't plan to vist cities much, and never if i can help it.

 

Topo maps, and color seem fitting. I don't mind a note book (paper) or pencil (wood with graphite core) A built in compass would be nice, and so would any form of distance. I can do metric if I must. I see some units don't appear to come with maps and you have to buy these for the areas you plan to be, and it can get costly, while other units come with maps. I'ld be mainly interested in Maine NH, and VT, but the lower 48 would be nice, or the eastern half of the USA coud work.

 

I haven't a clue. IMO there are way too may gps devices out there, and I am having a problem sorting them out.

 

Used but working is another key point. I wouldn't know a broken gps from a hole in the ground, err well, i know what a hole in the ground is. And water proof would be a better bet, I have been known to get real wet before. Maybe something I could grow into as I learn.

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Worth a read. http://www.follow-the-arrow.co.uk/

Specifically http://www.follow-the-arrow.co.uk/resources/gps.html

 

It's written by one of the UK reviewers, so is UK biased, but the information should be of use to you.

 

Nothing wrong with an older model GPS, be aware they may not be as quick, and may loose signal under heavy tree cover, and more important -Make sure it can connect to a computer, unless you want to put in coordinates by hand!

(Check the connection serial usually needs an adaptor -which can be a problem with the newer computer operating systems. USB connection should work straight out of the box...)

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Worth a read. http://www.follow-the-arrow.co.uk/

Specifically http://www.follow-the-arrow.co.uk/resources/gps.html

 

It's written by one of the UK reviewers, so is UK biased, but the information should be of use to you.

 

Nothing wrong with an older model GPS, be aware they may not be as quick, and may loose signal under heavy tree cover, and more important -Make sure it can connect to a computer, unless you want to put in coordinates by hand!

(Check the connection serial usually needs an adaptor -which can be a problem with the newer computer operating systems. USB connection should work straight out of the box...)

Yes i would prefer USB. At least i know what that is. Thanks for the links I will read them. I do a lot of reading, but some I don't understand. I am a doer type and while reading helps, having the tool, no matter what works better in hand.

 

The ast time i was in a possition like this i wanted to learn all about black powder guns and had no one around that knew anymore than I did, which was nothing.

 

40 years later I know most of the tricks. I never said I was fast. :D

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Reading something is OK, but if it doesn't quite make sense, someone telling it another way can often make it make sense!

 

Most here on the forums are happy to answer questions.

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I was wondering what all the letters were. Is it possible to create a lite list, that would be ok for a newbie?

 

I think I would like a gps, that worked in the moutains of NH since I live in them, and thar's trees alrighty everywhere. I don't plan to vist cities much, and never if i can help it.

 

Topo maps, and color seem fitting. I don't mind a note book (paper) or pencil (wood with graphite core) A built in compass would be nice, and so would any form of distance. I can do metric if I must. I see some units don't appear to come with maps and you have to buy these for the areas you plan to be, and it can get costly, while other units come with maps. I'ld be mainly interested in Maine NH, and VT, but the lower 48 would be nice, or the eastern half of the USA coud work.

 

I haven't a clue. IMO there are way too may gps devices out there, and I am having a problem sorting them out.

 

Used but working is another key point. I wouldn't know a broken gps from a hole in the ground, err well, i know what a hole in the ground is. And water proof would be a better bet, I have been known to get real wet before. Maybe something I could grow into as I learn.

 

The letters change around a little but within the 60 series you had the 60 (base model), 60C (colour screen) and 60CS (colour screen and sensors). Then came the 60Cx (colour screen and microSD slot) and 60CSx (colour screen, sensors and microSD slot). The -x series also had the higher sensitivity GPS chip.

 

Then came the 62 series where IIRC the 62s has the sensors and the 62st has the sensors and built-in topo maps.

 

The Oregon, Colorado and Montana have units with different numbers that have more features than a unit with a lower number, and the -t suffix means they come with preloaded topo maps. You can always buy the topo maps (or use something free based on OpenStreetMap or similar) later.

 

If you buy a used unit your best bet is probably going to be to buy it from someone who can show you it working. Obviously that limits your options but also means you know the thing works before you send a stranger your money.

 

Based on what you've described I'd say you'd want to be looking for an eTrex with the H somewhere in the name, for High sensitivity, and probably an HCx (high sensitivity, colour screen, microSD slot), or a 60-x series, or a 62 series. Which one will depend on your preference and your budget. If you go to a local caching event you'll probably find people with all sorts of units there that you can play with and see what works best for you.

 

The Oregon, Dakota and Montana units have a touchscreen which some people love and some people hate, the 60/62/eTrex use buttons to navigate menus.

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I was wondering what all the letters were. Is it possible to create a lite list, that would be ok for a newbie?

 

I think I would like a gps, that worked in the moutains of NH since I live in them, and thar's trees alrighty everywhere. I don't plan to vist cities much, and never if i can help it.

 

Topo maps, and color seem fitting. I don't mind a note book (paper) or pencil (wood with graphite core) A built in compass would be nice, and so would any form of distance. I can do metric if I must. I see some units don't appear to come with maps and you have to buy these for the areas you plan to be, and it can get costly, while other units come with maps. I'ld be mainly interested in Maine NH, and VT, but the lower 48 would be nice, or the eastern half of the USA coud work.

 

I haven't a clue. IMO there are way too may gps devices out there, and I am having a problem sorting them out.

 

Used but working is another key point. I wouldn't know a broken gps from a hole in the ground, err well, i know what a hole in the ground is. And water proof would be a better bet, I have been known to get real wet before. Maybe something I could grow into as I learn.

 

The letters change around a little but within the 60 series you had the 60 (base model), 60C (colour screen) and 60CS (colour screen and sensors). Then came the 60Cx (colour screen and microSD slot) and 60CSx (colour screen, sensors and microSD slot). The -x series also had the higher sensitivity GPS chip.

 

Then came the 62 series where IIRC the 62s has the sensors and the 62st has the sensors and built-in topo maps.

 

The Oregon, Colorado and Montana have units with different numbers that have more features than a unit with a lower number, and the -t suffix means they come with preloaded topo maps. You can always buy the topo maps (or use something free based on OpenStreetMap or similar) later.

 

If you buy a used unit your best bet is probably going to be to buy it from someone who can show you it working. Obviously that limits your options but also means you know the thing works before you send a stranger your money.

 

Based on what you've described I'd say you'd want to be looking for an eTrex with the H somewhere in the name, for High sensitivity, and probably an HCx (high sensitivity, colour screen, microSD slot), or a 60-x series, or a 62 series. Which one will depend on your preference and your budget. If you go to a local caching event you'll probably find people with all sorts of units there that you can play with and see what works best for you.

 

The Oregon, Dakota and Montana units have a touchscreen which some people love and some people hate, the 60/62/eTrex use buttons to navigate menus.

That was very helpfull. I am not sure about finding anyone local with a GPS, more so used and for sale, but I never say Never.

 

You appear to be using Euro English. If that is true run my zip code 03886 in a topo map program.

Back out some and move 6 miles due south for a ancient volcano, then go north for more mountains.

 

These are all mine :D Naw I just love this place.

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Another question is, is there a hand held unit for off trail, that will also run off a 12 volt power socket?

 

Besides geocaching I do hiking, and ride a motorcycle long distance sometimes. 2 or more power sources might be nice.

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If you have a cigarette jack (aka 12v power jack) then you may be able to power a GPS using that. Whether it can charge the batteries or not is another question, and one I don't have a quick answer for. Many handheld GPS units as I understand it use AA batteries, so if you had non-rechargable batteries in it and it did try to charge them, I don't know what would happen. As a sidenote, even if a GPS can't charge batteries in it, but you do have a 12v power jack, you can get rechargeable NIMH batteries and chargers that can run off the 12v jack. The Energizer one I have can charge 4 AA or AAA NIMH batteries in 15 minutes and has both AC and DC adapters.

 

Try looking up GPS models you are interested in on the manufacturer's store and see what accessories they sell. If a "vehicle power cable" is one of the available options, then that model is capable of it. Note that if buying a 3rd party adapter, some GPS units react differently to a 3rd party adapter then a manufacturer designed one. Like the Nuvi car GPS units. (I used a Nuvi 1300LM with a regular mini-USB cord and 12v->USB adapter and at first the Nuvi would go into PC mode. After a while (when it gave up trying to talk to a computer that wasn't there) it would switch to the regular GPS mode but powered by USB. (It could then also be turned off and charge the battery when not in use.) When using the adapter that it came with, it went right to GPS mode and not PC mode.

 

Incidentally, this particular cable:

https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?pID=1149

Apparently works with a variety of Etrex versions. (Though that one seems a bit overpriced and would cause me to at least try a 12v->USB adapter first.)

 

If you don't have a cigarette jack, then things get more complicated and it might be easier to get one installed.

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Another question is, is there a hand held unit for off trail, that will also run off a 12 volt power socket?

 

Besides geocaching I do hiking, and ride a motorcycle long distance sometimes. 2 or more power sources might be nice.

 

The more recent Garmin units should work from a cigarette socket. Failing that they go through AA batteries slowly (one pair of AA batteries routinely lasts me most of a day, sometimes more).

 

Your other question about finding someone with a used unit, I'm familiar with an area in the middle of backwoods PA and it's surprising just how many cachers there are near there. The nearest town worthy of the name is about 15 miles away but there's a few folks there. You might not find used units for sale but you'll probably find people with working units you can see in the field (which is so much better than briefly poking them in the shop). Once you've got an idea of what you like and what you don't like you can order something you'll most likely get on with.

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All my current vehicals including 2 motorcycles have 12 volt power take offs, in the form of lighters. I installed these on the mc's, for running volt meters, charging my wife's cell phone, and or running a small air compressor. I am a x foreign car tech (Euro cars mainly)

 

In the sence of my thinking, if a gps can run on AA batterys and also run on 12 volts, it would know which power source it was on, usually due to a mechanical switch at the jack plug.

 

Power specs on line seem to be missing, at least on older gps units.

 

I was looking over craigs list, and see in NH VT Me and Ma, some gps units. If I can narrow these selections down to one, I would prefer to buy face to face and get a mini lesson, if at all possible.

 

One way I find out an apx date is to read the add, then search on google, an d when google opens the page hunt for the eariest date.

 

I was looking over this GPS II Plus, which appears on google as early as 2002 for example. What I can't tell is if this is too old of a unit, if it can run on the 4 batterys as stated and also run on 12 dcv (direct current volts)

 

In fact here is the link to craigs http://nh.craigslist.org/ele/2513367464.html

 

I am not sure how to contact the seller, but I see a e-mail address, most likey assigned to the seller, and a phone number, which seems odd.

 

For the money I could drop it in a lake and not miss it much, but will it work for me? The seller seems a bit proud of the gps too ;-)

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If I were you I would do a search for caches by state, the events are all at the top of the list, find one that is convienent for you and attend. Most cachers would be happy to show you how their GPS operates and tell you why they like their model. Then you would know what models you want to focus on finding.

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According to the copyright date in the manual, the GPS II Plus seems to date back to 1997. It uses a proprietary connector port, which can accommodate a 12v power adapter. It can connect to a computer. (serial connector) But I don't know for sure if it would work with Garmin Communicator for easy transfer of coordinates, I don't know if it can accept GPX files. If buying the cables from the manufacturer, you're talking over $100 for 12v power cable/PC cable and serial to USB adapter. One other potential issue with it is that when off it apparently uses a second battery (a watch type battery I assume) to keep the memory circuits powered so it doesn't lose all the info stored in it. If that battery goes dead, you lose all the info in the unit and are supposed to have the battery replaced by an authorized repair center. (Modern units store info in flash memory and/or on flash memory cards which do not need a second battery.) As far as I know, it does not recharge AA batteries that are in it when it's used with a 12v power adapter. (It does use 4 AA batteries.)

 

I personally wouldn't buy a unit that was designed for a serial port interface. Especially if you happen to use Vista/Windows 7.

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If I were you I would do a search for caches by state, the events are all at the top of the list, find one that is convienent for you and attend. Most cachers would be happy to show you how their GPS operates and tell you why they like their model. Then you would know what models you want to focus on finding.

I am not sure I understand. On the Home page dropdown menu a listing under forums says events, and there is on in NH tomorrow, but clicking on it does nothing. I must be in the wrong place on that calandar.

 

On Edit: I think I understand now. Went to new england > new hampshire > events, and there is one in the southern part if the state tommorow.

Edited by Lodge Pole

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Anything older than about 2005 is likely to have an old chipset in it which might drop satellite lock under tree cover. Given the geology of NH you're probably going to be better off spending a little more (a 60CSx should do what you need and I'd be surprised if you can't get one for $150-200 or less) and buying a unit that will keep a lock under tree cover.

 

Otherwise looking for caches in the forest is going to get really frustrating for you.

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The more I read the better suited the garmin 60CSx seems to be. I am not sure if it comes loaded with maps, but probably a used one would. I am the type that would just assume all gps come with maps.. But I don't know the big picture, or the marketing.

 

For all I know I will have to pay for service, like we all do to be on line.

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The more I read the better suited the garmin 60CSx seems to be. I am not sure if it comes loaded with maps, but probably a used one would. I am the type that would just assume all gps come with maps.. But I don't know the big picture, or the marketing.

 

For all I know I will have to pay for service, like we all do to be on line.

 

The 60csx has basemaps only, meaning major highways in most cases. The 60csx has a micro SD card to add maps which you can get free from http://www.gpsfiledepot.com/ or buy them from Garmin.

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The more I read the better suited the garmin 60CSx seems to be. I am not sure if it comes loaded with maps, but probably a used one would. I am the type that would just assume all gps come with maps.. But I don't know the big picture, or the marketing.

 

For all I know I will have to pay for service, like we all do to be on line.

 

As PromedRick said the standard map is a base map which will show arterial routes only, and not have a lot of detail even on those.

 

A used unit may come with maps (if the seller has paired a map license to the GPS they will probably include it as they can't then pair it with a different unit), or you can buy your own, or source your own from a free or commercial source.

 

One advantage the newer units have is that you can produce your own maps, which means that you can scan a paper map, geotag it and then load it. Depending on the map and your local laws there may be copyright restrictions that make it illegal to scan some maps so check before you do it.

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About how long is a GPS on the market, before it is replaced with a new model?

 

I am looking for a used GPS, and have never before used one. All I want it for is geocaching.

 

It would be nice if it wasn't so out of date, updates can't happen, like it is with Windows 98.

 

Maybe that idea won't matter, but i don't know it won't. Thats an example.

 

I am assuming GPS need to be updated too. Perhaps they don't.

 

At is most basic a GPS simply does the work to get a position outdoors. In other words, if it works, and is reasonably accurate at it's job, then it's never out of date. That said I dropped my 12 year old unit like a bad habit when I had an incentive to upgrade this year, simply so I didn't have to carry a backpack full of batteries for the old unit on a multi-week wilderness trip.

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There is a Garmin 60 CSX in my state. I am thinking of making the guy on craigs lists an offer. He wants $215, which seems high a little to me. I might offer 180 cash, and take a ride if he agrees. Is my offer fair/with in reason?

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There is a Garmin 60 CSX in my state. I am thinking of making the guy on craigs lists an offer. He wants $215, which seems high a little to me. I might offer 180 cash, and take a ride if he agrees. Is my offer fair/with in reason?

 

I paid $200 for my used 60csx unit about a year ago when someone else was upgrading, if the unit is in good working order and the buttons are not worn off as they are fragile if the unit is not properly cared for, I would think $180 was a fair price.

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There is a Garmin 60 CSX in my state. I am thinking of making the guy on craigs lists an offer. He wants $215, which seems high a little to me. I might offer 180 cash, and take a ride if he agrees. Is my offer fair/with in reason?

 

Hard for me to be sure since I don't live in the US. Take a look at completed ebay auctions to see what sort of money they sell for (obviously only look at the ones that actually sold!) and use that as a baseline.

 

If you're taking a ride to get it make sure you see it working. Also make sure it is the CSx - at the top of the screen it will say "GPSMap 60CSx", if it says "GPSMap 60CS" then it's the much older model.

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Well the seller wants a firm 200, and I might bite on that, if he can show me it has full functions. The problem there is I won't be able to tell if it works but has a flaw, since I know nothing about this at all.

 

So long as it works as it should, if i don't like it I can always place it for sale. I can afford to loose 20 dollars, but not 200. Unless I drop it off a cliff, which is my doing.

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Well the seller wants a firm 200, and I might bite on that, if he can show me it has full functions. The problem there is I won't be able to tell if it works but has a flaw, since I know nothing about this at all.

 

So long as it works as it should, if i don't like it I can always place it for sale. I can afford to loose 20 dollars, but not 200. Unless I drop it off a cliff, which is my doing.

 

If it looks good cosmeticly, and can find a nearby cache as a test for operability, you should be good. By having the seller take you to a cache you can also get a hands on lesson on some of its features.

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Good idea.

 

He says in the add:

2GB micro SD card LOADED with maps and installed.

 

Complete High Definition 1:100,000 scale topo maps for all of the US, Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico.

 

Instruction booklet, quick start guide and registration card.

 

With some other items as well, so this maybe a ok deal, so long as it is as stated. I think it is, since he is in my state and appears to be willing to give me a demo/lesson.

 

He e-mailed promtly twice, but I think I lost him for the day.

 

I think he is younger than me, and all you youngsters are living life as if thar's no tomorrow :D

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Good idea.

 

He says in the add:

2GB micro SD card LOADED with maps and installed.

 

Complete High Definition 1:100,000 scale topo maps for all of the US, Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico.

 

Instruction booklet, quick start guide and registration card.

 

With some other items as well, so this maybe a ok deal, so long as it is as stated. I think it is, since he is in my state and appears to be willing to give me a demo/lesson.

 

He e-mailed promtly twice, but I think I lost him for the day.

 

I think he is younger than me, and all you youngsters are living life as if thar's no tomorrow :D

 

If it has the topo maps installed, from your early posts, your area is pretty rugged this would be a great deal at $200

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Well I am going to pay and pick it up face to face Wednesday. I don't know if I got 'played' but in e-mail the seller said some offered 215, and i said i would match that offer. I won't move up any more though. Also he said he would take it down off NH Craig's List, but I haven't checked.

 

Things are a little busy as my son has returned to NH from the sand. I was just on the phone with him, and he knows about gps stuff.

 

My next question is How bloomin cold can a gps work in? Will it deal with -40 below? Maybe so long as I don't drop it 1,000 feet straight down? I know I can warm batterys, so long as I can keep a beer from being a cylindrical hard object :D

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Well I am going to pay and pick it up face to face Wednesday. I don't know if I got 'played' but in e-mail the seller said some offered 215, and i said i would match that offer. I won't move up any more though. Also he said he would take it down off NH Craig's List, but I haven't checked.

 

Things are a little busy as my son has returned to NH from the sand. I was just on the phone with him, and he knows about gps stuff.

 

My next question is How bloomin cold can a gps work in? Will it deal with -40 below? Maybe so long as I don't drop it 1,000 feet straight down? I know I can warm batterys, so long as I can keep a beer from being a cylindrical hard object :D

 

60csx Temp. range: 5ºF to 158ºF (-15ºC to 70ºC)

 

From Garmin site http://www8.garmin.com/products/gpsmap60csx/spec.html

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ProMed Rick I owe you big for that link. I didn't see that page on the site, but i just booked marked it. Would you happen to know if I keep it in a warm inner pocket at -40ish if then it would work?

 

Long ago and for years I ran Minolta 35mm all manual cameras in -40, and learned to never let them warm up. Once they were chilled, you left them chilled, or condensation would build in the body and the shutter, or film would freeze solid. Motor cameras were a Royal Pain.

 

But maybe this GPS would deal with a wool shirt pocket next to my skin??? Pop it out deal with it, put it back in the warm?? With my mitts system I can peel open a swiss army screw driver blade, and even pick up dimes off a flat hunk of ice so long as the dime was cold and there was no sun. Of course back then you could make a call in a pay phone, but there were none on the mountain. Up there you can not remove mitts for more than 0,5 seconds, and I can't do anything that fast, so everything I do is with mitts on.

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ProMed Rick I owe you big for that link. I didn't see that page on the site, but i just booked marked it. Would you happen to know if I keep it in a warm inner pocket at -40ish if then it would work?

 

Long ago and for years I ran Minolta 35mm all manual cameras in -40, and learned to never let them warm up. Once they were chilled, you left them chilled, or condensation would build in the body and the shutter, or film would freeze solid. Motor cameras were a Royal Pain.

 

But maybe this GPS would deal with a wool shirt pocket next to my skin??? Pop it out deal with it, put it back in the warm?? With my mitts system I can peel open a swiss army screw driver blade, and even pick up dimes off a flat hunk of ice so long as the dime was cold and there was no sun. Of course back then you could make a call in a pay phone, but there were none on the mountain. Up there you can not remove mitts for more than 0,5 seconds, and I can't do anything that fast, so everything I do is with mitts on.

 

Condensation should not be a problem under your scenario, as long as the case remains sealed (being careful not to open rubber covers over electronic jacks).

 

IPX7 Protected against water immersion - Immersion for 30 minutes at a depth of 1 meter

 

A secondary safeguard system of placing the unit inside a freezer ziploc bag adds a secondary level of moisture protection under such extreme temps might help.

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With a purchase near at hand, set up for Wednesday now, in the add it made mention of a registration card. Other adds here and elsewhere also mention registration cards, which when I have any for products usually end up in the garden compost, unless I happen to buy something new. Even then there is a good chance I won't register the item, figuring it will last at least 2 days after warrenty runs out.

 

So why is this a point of sale for even years old gps units? Is it a means of anti theft?

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Could be it shows the seller has the full package rather than just the unit (which they could have stolen from someone). Of course it doesn't prove they didn't steal the full package from a retail outlet, if you want to be suspicious.

 

In terms of what extremes the unit will take I've never subjected mine to anything lower than about 5-10F when I was hiking in 12 inches of snow in PA. It coped with that just fine, clipped to my belt. It's certainly waterproof - I've used it in torrential rain and when it gets muddy (like when it's been on the handlebars of my mountain bike) I wash it under the tap.

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So I wouldn't be needing to register this with garmin as a used gps then? The idea occured to me I might to get any down loads or updates if that is possible at times.

 

I don't know how much a gps is like a specialized pc, and or if at times it needs a update. I also don't own a cell phone, but my wife does, and it appears to need updates if she is out of the local area. I dont really know what that does either.

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Garmin does make updated versions of the system software for at least some of their GPS units, though they are not something that is required. They are usually attempts to fix bugs and make the system more stable. (Sometimes though they end up introducing other bugs.)

 

To download and install those updates you would create an account on Garmin's website and register the GPS online to the account. If you were to buy maps from Garmin for your GPS, they would also be linked to your account. (As an example, A car GPS a family member bought came with a card enabling "Lifetime Map Updates" which had to be registered online with the GPS. Now when looking at the info page for that GPS online, there will be an option to update the maps if they are out of date.)

 

Don't know exactly what registration card the seller is talking about, or what would actually come with that particular type of GPS. It could be his way of saying that the GPS has not been registered online and linked to an account yet.

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Yesterday I did buy the Garmin GPSMAP60 CSx, and I have a lot to learn. I would like to thank everyone who assisted this choice and shared info, so I could relate well enough to make the choice that I bought a decent tool.

 

Currently I can turn it on, but can't make a lot of sence on how to use it, but it is time to more or less close this thread, and for me to take the topics and questions to GPS and Tech.

 

If any mods should choose to move this to another area in the fourums, that is fine by me. It was a big help for me to have this thread in the garage sale, while I knew it was off topic. Thanks for allowing this thread to remain so long.

 

It appears that the registry feature allows only one name to be registered per gps unit, and the seller had recinded his registry with Garmin, and so now I may register, and so be able to register the unit and log in at garmin, for service and any updates I may need. This may be wrong info, but it is the way I understand it at the moment.

 

Thanks ALL. Mac

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Yesterday I did buy the Garmin GPSMAP60 CSx, and I have a lot to learn. I would like to thank everyone who assisted this choice and shared info, so I could relate well enough to make the choice that I bought a decent tool.

 

Good choice, you should get a lot of use out of it.

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Another question is, is there a hand held unit for off trail, that will also run off a 12 volt power socket?

 

Besides geocaching I do hiking, and ride a motorcycle long distance sometimes. 2 or more power sources might be nice.

Some do, some don't. For those that don't, a battery charger that works from 12V is an option. There are battery chargers that will work from 240V, 110V, or 12V DC if you search around. Note a good quality battery charger is gentler on your batteries ... with the cost of batteries coming down and chargers not so much, I'm not sure of the economics. Too long since I bought a battery charger, and and I can't find all the batteries I bought anyway. Disorganised is me, woe me!

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I think you made a great choice for your first GPS unit. The X in the model name indicates that you should have great reception, even under tree cover. I upgraded from a 60CX to the Oregon 550, but I often miss the accuracy of my 60CX. $200 with the maps included is a good deal. The maps alone could have cost you over $100.

 

I wouldn't worry too much about the cold. I lived in Winnipeg (Winterpeg) when I was using the 60CX and I've cached in some bitterly cold weather. If it's colder than -40 out, chances are you'll be curled up in your house rather than out caching. I've certainly cached in -20 to -30 weather and had no problems. You just tend to burn through batteries faster, so make sure you carry an extra set, and try to keep those in an inside pocket.

 

I'd recommend trying to get out to some of the geocaching events in your area. That's the best way to meet other geocachers, and you'll find they will be happy to help you figure out how to get the most out of your new GPS unit.

 

Welcome to geocaching!

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I think you made a great choice for your first GPS unit. The X in the model name indicates that you should have great reception, even under tree cover. I upgraded from a 60CX to the Oregon 550, but I often miss the accuracy of my 60CX. $200 with the maps included is a good deal. The maps alone could have cost you over $100.

 

I wouldn't worry too much about the cold. I lived in Winnipeg (Winterpeg) when I was using the 60CX and I've cached in some bitterly cold weather. If it's colder than -40 out, chances are you'll be curled up in your house rather than out caching. I've certainly cached in -20 to -30 weather and had no problems. You just tend to burn through batteries faster, so make sure you carry an extra set, and try to keep those in an inside pocket.

 

I'd recommend trying to get out to some of the geocaching events in your area. That's the best way to meet other geocachers, and you'll find they will be happy to help you figure out how to get the most out of your new GPS unit.

 

Welcome to geocaching!

Oh no not me Man, -40 is my idea of good camping weather. No bugs and it can't rain! Check out weather reports for MT Washington in NH any time from Jan 1st to the end of February.

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Lodgepole, if not already suggested,(didn't read all post) you need to attend some type of local Geo event & meet the locals plus get some first hand one on one info about older units. You're getting great advice here but nothing beats talking to a face, not just a computer! :-)

It's fun & addictive so watch out!

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I will in my time, attend an event somewhere, but right now doing that would mean nothing, as I wouldn't understand what I was told. A GPSmap 60 SCx, has many possible settings per page, and settings with in settings. I press a lot of wrong buttons still, but am making some sence of it with the manual in hand. I am older and find the digital world some what daunting.

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