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Oakville geocachers?


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Hello, I was wondering if there is anyone in oakville, Ontario, who either owns an ax or can get one. If you match that description, please reply, as I have an awkward geocaching situation which needs resolving.

Thanks!

 

I do not match that description, but I've been to Oakville, and there are many Geocachers there. I will be following this thread when it gets moved to the Canada forum, because this certainly sounds interesting. :laughing:

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Hello, I was wondering if there is anyone in oakville, Ontario, who either owns an ax or can get one. If you match that description, please reply, as I have an awkward geocaching situation which needs resolving.

Thanks!

 

you're getting ready for a FTF run? :lol:

 

we're in Burlington but do not own such tool, mainly because we never had to use one while geocaching....

 

if you are planning to go for More Cowbell!™ you better not use the axe to get to it :lol:

Edited by t4e
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Hello, I was wondering if there is anyone in oakville, Ontario, who either owns an ax or can get one. If you match that description, please reply, as I have an awkward geocaching situation which needs resolving.

Thanks!

My bold .... what's this? Another smartphone geocaching app?

That's the only kind of axe that should be used around a geocache, and maybe not even then.....

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Ok, I'll bite. I have an axe. What do you need the axe for?

 

Well, the reason I need an axe is because I was out hiding a geocache, and I tripped and slid down a hill, and the cache flew out of my hand and into a looong hollow log with a hole in only one end. The cache is at the bottom of the log, and the only way to ge it out is to ax the log open... Wanna do it?

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Ok, I'll bite. I have an axe. What do you need the axe for?

 

Well, the reason I need an axe is because I was out hiding a geocache, and I tripped and slid down a hill, and the cache flew out of my hand and into a looong hollow log with a hole in only one end. The cache is at the bottom of the log, and the only way to ge it out is to ax the log open... Wanna do it?

 

Bwahahaahahahaahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha. In all likelihood, if the log is hollow it is probably mostly rotten, I don't think you need an axe to convince the tree. You could proably go at it with a claw hammer or just the collective sounds of cachers laughing, since we have felt your pain before.

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Ok, I'll bite. I have an axe. What do you need the axe for?

 

Well, the reason I need an axe is because I was out hiding a geocache, and I tripped and slid down a hill, and the cache flew out of my hand and into a looong hollow log with a hole in only one end. The cache is at the bottom of the log, and the only way to get it out is to ax the log open... Wanna do it?

 

I think you already hid the cache, just mark the co-ordinates! B)

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Ok, I'll bite. I have an axe. What do you need the axe for?

 

Well, the reason I need an axe is because I was out hiding a geocache, and I tripped and slid down a hill, and the cache flew out of my hand and into a looong hollow log with a hole in only one end. The cache is at the bottom of the log, and the only way to ge it out is to ax the log open... Wanna do it?

 

Bwahahaahahahaahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha. In all likelihood, if the log is hollow it is probably mostly rotten, I don't think you need an axe to convince the tree. You could proably go at it with a claw hammer or just the collective sounds of cachers laughing, since we have felt your pain before.

 

The log is rotting, but it's still pretty solid... I'll try your hammer idea...

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Ok, I'll bite. I have an axe. What do you need the axe for?

 

Well, the reason I need an axe is because I was out hiding a geocache, and I tripped and slid down a hill, and the cache flew out of my hand and into a looong hollow log with a hole in only one end. The cache is at the bottom of the log, and the only way to ge it out is to ax the log open... Wanna do it?

 

Bwahahaahahahaahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha. In all likelihood, if the log is hollow it is probably mostly rotten, I don't think you need an axe to convince the tree. You could proably go at it with a claw hammer or just the collective sounds of cachers laughing, since we have felt your pain before.

 

The log is rotting, but it's still pretty solid... I'll try your hammer idea...

Not wanting to burst a bubble.... but destroying the hollow log, or a viable live tree, or a power pole, or fence post, is all pretty much the same thing, is it not? A bit on the non-geo friendly side of things. You just may destroy the one thing that a wild critter needs to survive in next winter.

 

Yes, this post is a joke -- but only partly so, to cut/wreck/destroy that hollow log is technically against the guidelines.

 

I suggest making up a new cache, then recovering the other one when time does it's thing to the log. :blink:

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Before modifying the log... I'd consider the MacGuyver approach mentioned in another of your posts...

 

Stop and think about it. How big is the log, how big the container (hopefully waterproof). There can be several options.

Could you float it up to the opening by filling with water? Could you make a 'L-shaped hook' on a stick to lift it up.

I'm guessing the log is upright mostly, since it fell to the bottom end. The stick/pole might want to be telescopic. like a golf ball retriever pole. Is anything in the container or the container magnetic (attracted to magnet). Could you use some of that reusable adhesive on the pole. Can you see the container using a flashlight? Is the log standing (stump) or laying on a hill / flat? Could it be turned around to allow it to fall out? Size is important isn't it.

 

None of these are guarantees, but there are many 'TOOL' and 'METHOD' puzzles out there. Some provided and some you have to 'invent' to recover the cache. Also lots that get dropped into holes, pipes, pushed too far into a hide spot to reach by hand and so on.

Cache owners have to get inventive to recover their containers all the time... It often leads to figuring a new way to hide a puzzle or mystery cache as well, next one.

 

Anyway, thinking and experimenting will be more rewarding I think. Damage is not desireable, but can remain a last resort option if minimal.

 

Doug 7rxc

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Yes, this post is a joke -- but only partly so, to cut/wreck/destroy that hollow log is technically against the guidelines.

 

I suggest making up a new cache, then recovering the other one when time does it's thing to the log. :blink:

 

please show me where the guidelines tell you not to mess with what mature nature has discarded

 

you are not really implying he keeps an eye on the log until its all rotten, are you? :blink:

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Oakville? I'm shocked we haven't heard from Canada's most prominent Bill Clinton look-alike, Northern Eagle. I'll bet he has an axe. Several, actually.

 

EDIT: I changed my username a year ago, he probably has no idea who Mr. Yuck is. No biggie, he'll never see this.

 

Anywho, this is an interesting dilema, hacking up a dead downed hollow log. Is there any other way to possibly retrieve it?

Edited by Mr.Yuck
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please show me where the guidelines tell you not to mess with what mature nature has discarded

 

you are not really implying he keeps an eye on the log until its all rotten, are you? :blink:

 

In the Fundamental Geocaching Placement section of the knowledge books it says:

 

Geocache placements do not deface or destroy public or private property. Geocaches are placed so that the surrounding environment is safe from both intentional or unintentional harm. Keep both natural and human-made objects safe. No object or property may be altered to provide a hiding place, clue, or means of logging a find.

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please show me where the guidelines tell you not to mess with what mature nature has discarded

 

you are not really implying he keeps an eye on the log until its all rotten, are you? :blink:

Interesting... I really do not think that nature EVER discards ANYTHING.

 

The matter deals with destruction. Live, dead, natural or not -- it doesn't matter.

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please show me where the guidelines tell you not to mess with what mature nature has discarded

 

you are not really implying he keeps an eye on the log until its all rotten, are you? :blink:

 

In the Fundamental Geocaching Placement section of the knowledge books it says:

 

Geocache placements do not deface or destroy public or private property. Geocaches are placed so that the surrounding environment is safe from both intentional or unintentional harm. Keep both natural and human-made objects safe. No object or property may be altered to provide a hiding place, clue, or means of logging a find.

 

cutting up a piece of log in the woods is not exactly defacing or destroying anything, it is already destroyed

 

 

please show me where the guidelines tell you not to mess with what mature nature has discarded

 

you are not really implying he keeps an eye on the log until its all rotten, are you? :blink:

Interesting... I really do not think that nature EVER discards ANYTHING.

 

The matter deals with destruction. Live, dead, natural or not -- it doesn't matter.

 

of course it does...that's where natural selection comes into play

 

as i said above, a dead tree is already destroyed

 

now if that dead log was carved up and placed as a piece of art and someone went and messed with it, that would be destroying it

Edited by t4e
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Interesting... I really do not think that nature EVER discards ANYTHING.

 

The matter deals with destruction. Live, dead, natural or not -- it doesn't matter.

 

of course it does...that's where natural selection comes into play

 

as i said above, a dead tree is already destroyed

 

now if that dead log was carved up and placed as a piece of art and someone went and messed with it, that would be destroying it

 

In fact, when you go to provincial camp sites you are told not to remove deadwood for fires, since it is part of the decomposition process. I am pretty sure that you could mess with a dead plant, just don't remove it.

 

I don't know how all the hippy/environmentalists are able fly into wooded areas and never step on any plants or break any branches :ph34r: ?! I almost certainly will do some damage on every "off trail" adventure that I participate in.

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I don't know how all the hippy/environmentalists are able fly into wooded areas and never step on any plants or break any branches :ph34r: ?! I almost certainly will do some damage on every "off trail" adventure that I participate in.

 

do they actually go walking in wooded areas or just latch on to the nearest tree?

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I don't know how all the hippy/environmentalists are able fly into wooded areas and never step on any plants or break any branches :ph34r: ?! I almost certainly will do some damage on every "off trail" adventure that I participate in.

 

do they actually go walking in wooded areas or just latch on to the nearest tree?

 

Great Question! Maybe the SooMukwas can tell us their strategy. Unless some other tree hugger/hippy can tell us.

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I don't know how all the hippy/environmentalists are able fly into wooded areas and never step on any plants or break any branches :ph34r: ?! I almost certainly will do some damage on every "off trail" adventure that I participate in.

 

do they actually go walking in wooded areas or just latch on to the nearest tree?

 

Great Question! Maybe the SooMukwas can tell us their strategy. Unless some other tree hugger/hippy can tell us.

 

I just let the FTF hounds go first. Most of the time, there is nothing left to kill or destroy if you just follow their trail straight to the cache afterwards.

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I don't know how all the hippy/environmentalists are able fly into wooded areas and never step on any plants or break any branches :ph34r: ?! I almost certainly will do some damage on every "off trail" adventure that I participate in.

 

do they actually go walking in wooded areas or just latch on to the nearest tree?

 

Great Question! Maybe the SooMukwas can tell us their strategy. Unless some other tree hugger/hippy can tell us.

 

I just let the FTF hounds go first. Most of the time, there is nothing left to kill or destroy if you just follow their trail straight to the cache afterwards.

 

I'm cringing right now at the thought of a land manager in Oakville logging onto the GS forums for the first time ..... can't imagine what, say, the Superintendant of Bronte Creek Provincial Park would think reading the above. Actually I can imagine - he's banned geocaching in that park for fears that cachers are just like that. :ph34r:

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I don't know how all the hippy/environmentalists are able fly into wooded areas and never step on any plants or break any branches :ph34r: ?! I almost certainly will do some damage on every "off trail" adventure that I participate in.

 

do they actually go walking in wooded areas or just latch on to the nearest tree?

 

Great Question! Maybe the SooMukwas can tell us their strategy. Unless some other tree hugger/hippy can tell us.

 

I just let the FTF hounds go first. Most of the time, there is nothing left to kill or destroy if you just follow their trail straight to the cache afterwards.

 

I'm cringing right now at the thought of a land manager in Oakville logging onto the GS forums for the first time ..... can't imagine what, say, the Superintendant of Bronte Creek Provincial Park would think reading the above. Actually I can imagine - he's banned geocaching in that park for fears that cachers are just like that. :ph34r:

 

well in that case they would have only themselves to blame if they approved the hide in a location that shouldn't be trampled on, wouldn't they?

 

we placed caches in areas where we had to get permission, and before it was granted, someone from the park actually went out and found the cache, in one instance we were asked to move it because it was in what they deemed a sensitive area

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I don't know how all the hippy/environmentalists are able fly into wooded areas and never step on any plants or break any branches :ph34r: ?! I almost certainly will do some damage on every "off trail" adventure that I participate in.

 

do they actually go walking in wooded areas or just latch on to the nearest tree?

 

Great Question! Maybe the SooMukwas can tell us their strategy. Unless some other tree hugger/hippy can tell us.

 

I just let the FTF hounds go first. Most of the time, there is nothing left to kill or destroy if you just follow their trail straight to the cache afterwards.

 

I'm cringing right now at the thought of a land manager in Oakville logging onto the GS forums for the first time ..... can't imagine what, say, the Superintendant of Bronte Creek Provincial Park would think reading the above. Actually I can imagine - he's banned geocaching in that park for fears that cachers are just like that. :ph34r:

 

well in that case they would have only themselves to blame if they approved the hide in a location that shouldn't be trampled on, wouldn't they?

 

we placed caches in areas where we had to get permission, and before it was granted, someone from the park actually went out and found the cache, in one instance we were asked to move it because it was in what they deemed a sensitive area

 

The point here is that if we go around promoting that we are a bunch of cave people tromping around on everything in sight, you won't get the chance to ask for that cache placement - sensitive or not. Case in point I've encountered at least a dozen land owners who are absolutely convinced that geocaching is about burying things off trail. Bragging about bushwhacking, or making statements that "most geocachers" trample vegetation leads land owners to an easy conclusion: ban it.

 

I mention it here, because this thread is about Oakville. There are several land managers in the Oakville area who may take interest in this thread in the future: Town of Oakville, Ontario Parks (Bronte), Conservation Halton are some examples. If those three organizations suddenly turned around and banned the "destructive" hobby, where would we hide caches in South Halton? Right now, the Town of Oakville doesn't care (know?) about geocaching, Ontario Parks Bronte bans it outright, and Conservation Halton *promotes* the activity. Remember this thread will live on in Google long after we're done joking around about trampling the odd flowerbed.

 

Of course a geocache should be placed where it will minimize impact. Post parking coordinates and trailheads. Talk to the land owners. But don't undo all that good work by carrying on in here like we expect GZ to get trashed.

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I don't know how all the hippy/environmentalists are able fly into wooded areas and never step on any plants or break any branches :ph34r: ?! I almost certainly will do some damage on every "off trail" adventure that I participate in.

 

do they actually go walking in wooded areas or just latch on to the nearest tree?

 

Great Question! Maybe the SooMukwas can tell us their strategy. Unless some other tree hugger/hippy can tell us.

 

I just let the FTF hounds go first. Most of the time, there is nothing left to kill or destroy if you just follow their trail straight to the cache afterwards.

 

I'm cringing right now at the thought of a land manager in Oakville logging onto the GS forums for the first time ..... can't imagine what, say, the Superintendant of Bronte Creek Provincial Park would think reading the above. Actually I can imagine - he's banned geocaching in that park for fears that cachers are just like that. :ph34r:

 

well in that case they would have only themselves to blame if they approved the hide in a location that shouldn't be trampled on, wouldn't they?

 

we placed caches in areas where we had to get permission, and before it was granted, someone from the park actually went out and found the cache, in one instance we were asked to move it because it was in what they deemed a sensitive area

 

The point here is that if we go around promoting that we are a bunch of cave people tromping around on everything in sight, you won't get the chance to ask for that cache placement - sensitive or not. Case in point I've encountered at least a dozen land owners who are absolutely convinced that geocaching is about burying things off trail. Bragging about bushwhacking, or making statements that "most geocachers" trample vegetation leads land owners to an easy conclusion: ban it.

 

I mention it here, because this thread is about Oakville. There are several land managers in the Oakville area who may take interest in this thread in the future: Town of Oakville, Ontario Parks (Bronte), Conservation Halton are some examples. If those three organizations suddenly turned around and banned the "destructive" hobby, where would we hide caches in South Halton? Right now, the Town of Oakville doesn't care (know?) about geocaching, Ontario Parks Bronte bans it outright, and Conservation Halton *promotes* the activity. Remember this thread will live on in Google long after we're done joking around about trampling the odd flowerbed.

 

Of course a geocache should be placed where it will minimize impact. Post parking coordinates and trailheads. Talk to the land owners. But don't undo all that good work by carrying on in here like we expect GZ to get trashed.

 

+1

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The point here is that if we go around promoting that we are a bunch of cave people tromping around on everything in sight, you won't get the chance to ask for that cache placement - sensitive or not. Case in point I've encountered at least a dozen land owners who are absolutely convinced that geocaching is about burying things off trail. Bragging about bushwhacking, or making statements that "most geocachers" trample vegetation leads land owners to an easy conclusion: ban it.

 

I mention it here, because this thread is about Oakville. There are several land managers in the Oakville area who may take interest in this thread in the future: Town of Oakville, Ontario Parks (Bronte), Conservation Halton are some examples. If those three organizations suddenly turned around and banned the "destructive" hobby, where would we hide caches in South Halton? Right now, the Town of Oakville doesn't care (know?) about geocaching, Ontario Parks Bronte bans it outright, and Conservation Halton *promotes* the activity. Remember this thread will live on in Google long after we're done joking around about trampling the odd flowerbed.

 

Of course a geocache should be placed where it will minimize impact. Post parking coordinates and trailheads. Talk to the land owners. But don't undo all that good work by carrying on in here like we expect GZ to get trashed.

 

i hear what you saying and its unfortunate that some will choose to make a judgement based on a couple of comments in a forum, but i guess its human nature and its easier to remember the bad

 

as with anything there are bad apples around but the power of persuasion and behaviour of the majority should prevail

to me in most cases those problems arise from the cache placement, regardless of having to be approved or not prior to publishing

 

its one of the reasons that i would much rather have a micro, which gives many more options to hide it without having to go off the trails, in a sensitive area as opposed to a big honking ammo can that requires a lot of space and to be way off the trails into the woods

 

but this of course opens a different can of worms because its against the purists beliefs that seem to think that a great location must have a big container in order to enjoy it, except for those that cache with kids and would want some trading items, the majority make the find to discover the location and to sign the log

parents can turn this into a lesson about respecting nature and our surroundings

 

so to go back to the "power of persuasion" when talking to land managers/owners, if the approach is to show them that caches, micro or small, can indeed be placed without any unnecessary damage to the surroundings we're good to go

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So what happened to the cache in question???

 

It's not doing so well.

 

No, it isn't, is it?

 

The Pole is not doing well either, FYI you don't need a printer to put a log in the cache, any plain notebook will do

 

The cache was a micro, so a notebook wouldn't fit, and 1 sheet from a notebook is too messy for me... And I need to figure out how to stop the pole from getting muggled...

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