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knowschad

Pictures - Cemetery Cool Caches

120 posts in this topic

I started this in a cemetery cache thread, but then it occurred to me that this would make a great running thread, much like the Cool Cache Containers, Among The Ruins, and Hungry Tree threads. I'll get it started with a few that I had posted to that other thread:

 

These first two are from the Irish Hollow cemetery near Ontonagon, MI: http://coord.info/GCW1YB

 

13ef5027-c285-4a1c-bf66-06d2ff2164b0.jpg

 

58ae193c-fa75-4af2-afed-df4fadf4898b.jpg

 

Next three are from the Cliff Mine cemetery in Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula: http://coord.info/GCRA6R

9253281e-e57f-4073-a369-45a9955f3812.jpg

 

353a1a94-51a5-488f-8c84-62ba817d3fe3.jpg

 

25e170b3-f47c-4099-a665-ff59cf6defc7.jpg

 

The next three come from Stockholm, WI: http://coord.info/GC1PFEP

 

This one was particularly touching, even though it wasn't nearly as old as some of the others:

a19d6302-0512-45a0-bef8-8545267a9268.jpg

 

1705eda6-5f04-4a5f-90ed-2146dc051c2f.jpg

 

aea32a62-bcf4-43a9-bbbe-b61d9f829ab5.jpg

Edited by knowschad
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exactly why I love cemetery caches. I got choked up seeing the rock.

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f3654de6-233f-4f37-936e-eb1e1f3470a2.jpg

 

Picture of a dog's gravestone illegally placed in a state forest. I also noticed that the stone had the name of a WW2 vet printed on the other side, as it was also illegally obtained from the veteran's administration.

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Here are some nice photos of Pleasant View Cemetery in Mason, New Hampshire:

 

aed1a1fc-fab3-4e04-a475-effc8e3262b8.jpg

 

f6c71578-fc88-4c28-85d2-631cd247f770.jpg

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Cool. Looks just like Waymarking.

Let's try to keep that sort of comment out of here, OK? Thank you.

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428e792d-8028-44b6-a243-ddab8573cfcb.jpg

 

Found it at a waycache. Or was it a geomark?

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A rare Zinc Headstone I noticed in rural central Ohio, for a child who died at age 1 in the late 1800's. I actually DNF'd the cache. Zinc headstones, when you can find them, really stand the test of time. They were manufactured only from the Mid 1870's ==> 1912. I go out of my way to look for them every single time I'm caching in a cemetery.

 

5ffae22a-664d-4da1-96e0-214360140bf6.jpg

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KnowsChad, you can't even begin to imagine how upset you've made me. I had forgotten about it, but a cache brought me to this cemetary nearby. It was from the 1800 and woodland all around it, this one tombstone had a tree fallen over on it, but the tombstone was still standing. The picture had a small pond in the background, and a beautiful view of the sunset, which came by just as I was leaving the GZ.

 

This picture is now lost forever, and I've been searching too...

 

AGGGHHHH. :(

Edited by Coldgears
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I've checked 5 USB drives, painstakingly went through 50 - 100 Emails with an image attachment, looked through two old phones just in case I texted it, looked in 4 different image hosting sites, looked in old folder's on facebook which I no longer allow anyone but me to see (which is a pain to get too, and I have a lot of them, all my bad photo's go into non-public ones.) I checked all my geocaching logs.

 

The photo is gone, and the local Boy Scouts cleaned up the cemetery so the tree is gone.

 

I'm so upset. :(

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img_6076.jpgThis was going to be my first cache hide, but the reviewer said I had to get permission from the cemetery. I didn't pursue that. This is the grave of the person who started rail mail. It's in Rosehill Cemetery in Chicago. Edited by GrateBear
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A rare Zinc Headstone I noticed in rural central Ohio, for a child who died at age 1 in the late 1800's. I actually DNF'd the cache. Zinc headstones, when you can find them, really stand the test of time. They were manufactured only from the Mid 1870's ==> 1912. I go out of my way to look for them every single time I'm caching in a cemetery.

 

5ffae22a-664d-4da1-96e0-214360140bf6.jpg

 

Zinc! Of course!! I recently discovered an old cemetery (no cache nearby) that had two of those, but I didn't realize that is what they were. Next time I get out that way, I will take some pictures and post them.

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What beautiful iron work in some of those photos. I don't see markers like that. I love the cross in your (original poster) third shot. Here's one from a cemetery that had a cache hidden nearby. This tree seems to be taking over this plot.

da2ad88e-3ae9-4633-a3ee-af4c56b7b61c.jpg

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Not a great photo, but I don't want to give away information on how to complete the multi without visiting this site. The gravesite of Professor Hidesaburo Ueno and his loyal dog Hachiko in Aoyama Cemetery in Minato, Tokyo.

 

i-H4H6SGV-L.jpg

At Rest At His Master’s Feet

Edited by Chrysalides
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I don't take many photos, but here are a couple I took at a cache at the entrance of a cemetery:

7ebb4370-37dc-41e1-a2cb-f40d1a1ceeb1.jpgaaac18f9-b69d-45e2-b855-c0cc3b496d7d.jpg

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I have tons of pictures from cemetery caches, I love cemeteries. I'll post a few, here and there, when I get around to it.

 

These two were taken while our family was caching with ODragon and Rachelhead in Woodlands Cemetery, Philadelphia:

 

5065766404_c0de11cba5_z.jpg

nom nom by Ambrosia_apples, on Flickr

 

5063430403_48bd26be9a_z.jpg

watching over by Ambrosia_apples, on Flickr

Edited by Ambrosia
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Three we took in Ireland recently while searching for a cache in a wood:

 

743c705c-fa5e-4a47-afe2-d4b9b8b63b9b.jpg

 

63cc68f1-718c-4012-973e-94f82ff872e2.jpg

 

b3258625-6340-4f7b-abab-17b8628967eb.jpg

 

MrsB

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I really love cemetery caches, the older the cemetery the better. I always seem to feel a sort of connection with the past looking at how the different generations chose to memorialize their loved ones.

 

I have a cache in a cemetery that was abandoned by it's owner (the cemetery, not the cache!) and taken over by the city. For the longest time it was in disrepair, until several volunteer organizations took it upon themselves to clean up the site. There are markers from the Civil War, including a Civil War Naval section - Bay City, Michigan was known for it's shipyards.

 

I can't seem to get pics to post, but the cache is Gone and (almost) Forgotten GC1AD1E.

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OK, I can't resist posting this even though it was taken not in the course of geocaching but of another hobby beginning with "ge". This is the gravestone of my great great great great grandmother Jane Aldrich (not that you can read it probably), in White Store, NY. It was evening when I took the picture but nowhere near as dark as it looks from the photo, and I didn't notice the spiders until I had the film processed and saw the picture. Just posting a link for the protection of the arachnophobic.

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IMG_0245.jpg

This is a virtual in my area. Don't want to give away who it's for but the story is seriously touching. Here's a link to the cache listing...

That was on my list of caches to do when we were up there in 2009. Unfortunately, we were never able to get to it.

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Here's a few of mine cut n pasted from the other page. I think I have a few more somewhere...

 

f75a1cfe-7063-4752-b576-3df4258e8dde.jpg

 

In my mind this guy's name was Dewey but everyone just called him Dew. He was listed in the phone book as Mountain Dew.

 

51e36b13-a536-4a50-9a72-460eb931c1e2.jpg

 

Overgrown cemetery in western Wisconsin.

 

7a8da552-01b2-4dc0-b4f3-691f14e5481f.jpg

 

Lonely tire swing.

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Here's one of a Civil War veteran. The picture didn't turn out so well. There was also a marker nearby for someone born during the Revolutionary War but I could not get a good picture of that one as the stone was really worn down.

 

beff5e57-a860-4d19-8e8b-f94fc296bb9c.jpg

 

I really like this thread. I need to remember to carry my camera when doing cemetery caches so I can post more photos here.

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Tree stump headstones were very popular in my area toward the end of the 19th century. I found some information about them on this site:

 

 

Tree-Stump Tombstones

Tree-stump tombstones depict a lifelike tree and is traditionally carved out of limestone or marble. This tombstone first appeared in the 1870's and was popular for approximately sixty years. Seen in Europe and the United States, these carvings qualify as folk art. The tree-stump design shows a living tree that has been cut down, suggesting that the individual was also cut down in the prime of life. Branches are also seen to be cut-off close to the stump, symbolising other family members who have died before their time. In some instances the initials of these family members appear to be carved into these cut-off limbs.

 

Inscriptions are cut into the "wood" where the bark has been cut away, or more often, a scroll appears to nailed to the stump, or suspended from a rope hanger. Various flowers and ivy are often carved as offerings at the base, or growing around the stump. An assortment of items are often seen on top of the stump, ranging from a cross, bible, anchor, flowers, or even the name and dates for the individual buried.

.t-tombstone1.gif

 

 

 

The one below is from http://coord.info/GC1FVNH

 

ff63f535-57a6-462f-8dcb-b1b2048382c6.jpg

 

The rest of these were taken in Wisconsin at http://coord.info/GC1HCJC

 

cd9233ed-701e-449a-926b-10ec76d3c50e.jpg

 

997e8a10-991e-45c7-8c57-7c92f9b8f76a.jpg

 

69261b4c-0c3b-45a2-b80a-7f63ffb6ef49.jpg

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I started this in a cemetery cache thread, but then it occurred to me that this would make a great running thread, much like the Cool Cache Containers, Among The Ruins, and Hungry Tree threads.

I

 

Your pictures are nice and I'd like to visit these cemetaries. I wonder, however, where the cache containers are hidden. I cannot recognize a container. I certainly do not want anyone to post spoiler pictures, but as long as no caches are shown, I guess the topic is rather nice cemetary locations which have been visited while geocaching, isn't it?

 

BTW I once did a night cache that led to a mystic area with old family tombs. I do not have pictures of the area, but some can be found in the gallery

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/gallery.aspx?guid=a7c9835e-10db-4240-90e0-0bbbfb1a6951

 

Cezanne

Edited by cezanne
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I started this in a cemetery cache thread, but then it occurred to me that this would make a great running thread, much like the Cool Cache Containers, Among The Ruins, and Hungry Tree threads.

I

 

Your pictures are nice and I'd like to visit these cemetaries. I wonder, however, where the cache containers are hidden. I cannot recognize a container. I certainly do not want anyone to post spoiler pictures, but as long as no caches are shown, I guess the topic is rather nice cemetary locations which have been visited while geocaching, isn't it?

 

BTW I once did a night cache that led to a mystic area with old family tombs. I do not have pictures of the area, but some can be found in the gallery

http://www.geocachin...e0-0bbbfb1a6951

 

Cezanne

Very few of those that I've posted actually have the container hidden in the cemetery, and none were anywhere near the headstones. These are the things that you get to see when a cemetery cache brings you there. I have personally only seen one cemetery cache that was hidden close to a stone, and that was by a caching team that was well known for putting out poorly thought-out hides.

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Very few of those that I've posted actually have the container hidden in the cemetery, and none were anywhere near the headstones. These are the things that you get to see when a cemetery cache brings you there. I have personally only seen one cemetery cache that was hidden close to a stone, and that was by a caching team that was well known for putting out poorly thought-out hides.

 

Almost all of the ones in my area are either virtuals / puzzles, or they're well away from anything near a headstone which is good because you won't have some idiot trampling a stone to find tupperware. rolleyes.gif

 

 

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Very few of those that I've posted actually have the container hidden in the cemetery, and none were anywhere near the headstones.

 

Good to hear. I enjoy this type of cemetary caches, but do not enjoy those with hideouts on stones.

 

This cache leads through the largest cemetary of Graz

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?guid=14515ae9-5e4c-41c4-ba00-b1e2fb8508e3

but is hidden outside. It is done in a very respectful manner. A few photographs can be seen in the gallery.

I do not have made any pictures of my own.

 

Cezanne

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I started this in a cemetery cache thread, but then it occurred to me that this would make a great running thread, much like the Cool Cache Containers, Among The Ruins, and Hungry Tree threads.

I

 

Your pictures are nice and I'd like to visit these cemetaries. I wonder, however, where the cache containers are hidden. I cannot recognize a container. I certainly do not want anyone to post spoiler pictures, but as long as no caches are shown, I guess the topic is rather nice cemetary locations which have been visited while geocaching, isn't it?

 

BTW I once did a night cache that led to a mystic area with old family tombs. I do not have pictures of the area, but some can be found in the gallery

http://www.geocachin...e0-0bbbfb1a6951

 

Cezanne

Very few of those that I've posted actually have the container hidden in the cemetery, and none were anywhere near the headstones. These are the things that you get to see when a cemetery cache brings you there. I have personally only seen one cemetery cache that was hidden close to a stone, and that was by a caching team that was well known for putting out poorly thought-out hides.

 

Were their initials "H&S"? (teeth grinding and blood pressure rising)

 

There is a really sweet tree stump marker in Hudson, WI. It is easily the most impressive and coolest marker I've ever seen. It stands at least 10' tall and looks like a real tree from a distance.

 

Edited for spelling...

Edited by Team Dennis
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I started this in a cemetery cache thread, but then it occurred to me that this would make a great running thread, much like the Cool Cache Containers, Among The Ruins, and Hungry Tree threads.

I

 

Your pictures are nice and I'd like to visit these cemetaries. I wonder, however, where the cache containers are hidden. I cannot recognize a container. I certainly do not want anyone to post spoiler pictures, but as long as no caches are shown, I guess the topic is rather nice cemetary locations which have been visited while geocaching, isn't it?

 

BTW I once did a night cache that led to a mystic area with old family tombs. I do not have pictures of the area, but some can be found in the gallery

http://www.geocachin...e0-0bbbfb1a6951

 

Cezanne

Very few of those that I've posted actually have the container hidden in the cemetery, and none were anywhere near the headstones. These are the things that you get to see when a cemetery cache brings you there. I have personally only seen one cemetery cache that was hidden close to a stone, and that was by a caching team that was well known for putting out poorly thought-out hides.

 

Were their initials "H&S"? (teeth grinding and blood presure rising)

 

There is a really sweet tree stump marker in Hudson, WI. It is easily the most impressive and coolest marker I've ever seen. It stands at least 10' tall and looks like a real tree from a distance.

Yup. That's them. And yes, I know the tree stump marker that you are referring to. Very impressive.

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These two were taken while our family was caching with ODragon and Rachelhead in Woodlands Cemetery, Philadelphia:

One thing I don't get, why do Odragon and Rachelhead always geocache together?

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Cool. Looks just like Waymarking.

Let's try to keep that sort of comment out of here, OK? Thank you.

Waymarking has some great categorys for cemeterys. Check out this nice one of mine.http://www.Waymarking.com/waymarks/WMAE8A_Hagan_Cemetery_Dungannon_Va

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We've visited many of those same cemeteries Knowschad shared, and being a storyteller, I couldn't resist taking a photo of the one he shared, the stone where all the stories were told.

 

One of the cachers in Wisconsin, known as marc_54140, had a really cool cemetery challenge. He would highlight some funerary custom, then in the days before ALRs were struck down, you would have to find another example and upload a photo with the location. Some were really tough. I have been told, after the fact, that I literally walked past one with a Circuit Rider designation two weeks ago. That was one of the tough ones. Many of us caching in the state have learned to really look for these pieces of history courtesy of that challenge.

 

There is also an EarthCache in the Green Bay area by peach107 that features the zinc headstones, and requires travel throughout one of the larger cemeteries in the area. I once saw a really, really unusual stone on a blog written by someone who is a dulcimer player AND geocacher. I was looking for dulcimer stuff at the time, but this stone was almost surreal. Computer crashed, lost my bookmark. I think it was in Ohio or Indiana. I was trying to track it down before my trip east this spring, but no luck.

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Tree stump headstones were very popular in my area toward the end of the 19th century. I found some information about them on this site:

 

 

Tree-Stump Tombstones

Tree-stump tombstones depict a lifelike tree and is traditionally carved out of limestone or marble. This tombstone first appeared in the 1870's and was popular for approximately sixty years. Seen in Europe and the United States, these carvings qualify as folk art. The tree-stump design shows a living tree that has been cut down, suggesting that the individual was also cut down in the prime of life. Branches are also seen to be cut-off close to the stump, symbolising other family members who have died before their time. In some instances the initials of these family members appear to be carved into these cut-off limbs.

 

Inscriptions are cut into the "wood" where the bark has been cut away, or more often, a scroll appears to nailed to the stump, or suspended from a rope hanger. Various flowers and ivy are often carved as offerings at the base, or growing around the stump. An assortment of items are often seen on top of the stump, ranging from a cross, bible, anchor, flowers, or even the name and dates for the individual buried.

.t-tombstone1.gif

 

 

 

The one below is from http://coord.info/GC1FVNH

 

ff63f535-57a6-462f-8dcb-b1b2048382c6.jpg

 

 

That's interesting - They look like Woodmen of the World head stones that were used into the 1930's. These stone logs are labeled "Woodmen of the World" - otherwise I'd have no idea what they were.

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I love the history that surrounds cemetery caches. This cemetery is located along to way to 3 different caches. The cemetery has many headstones from the mid 1800s and many more that time has worn away. This is one of those spots that I never would have known about if not for geocaching. A real hidden gem.

 

ef2cbc1d-8bdc-4e22-991b-beece7ab688b.jpg

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I found a cache in a cemetery today. As I walked towards the cache, I saw a man learning against a grave, clearly upset and in mourning. I'd never understood why some people are against graveyard geocaches, but this experience changed my mind a bit.

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I found a cache in a cemetery today. As I walked towards the cache, I saw a man learning against a grave, clearly upset and in mourning. I'd never understood why some people are against graveyard geocaches, but this experience changed my mind a bit.

 

That's where discretion and common sense come into play. You can always come back to grab the cache later after the person has left.

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This is a picture of a very unique headstone. It is in a cemetery overlooking Littlefield, AZ. and the cache is just outside the fence surrounding the small lot of headstones.

 

Since we love benchmark hunting and are rockhounders, this definitely caught my eye.

 

e4b94067-4579-4b95-bc28-84032a513186.jpg

 

And the other tiny cemetery is at House Rock, AZ. - along Highway 89A going towards the North Rim of the Grand Canyon from Lees Ferry.

 

Lonely%20Graves.jpg

 

The one old wooden marker states

"Here lies Moon Mullens

Died 1918

House Rock Valley

Arizona"

 

Lonely%20Graves%202.jpg

 

The other old wooden headstone is easy to see as someone has filled in with either chalk or paint.

 

Lonely%20Graves%203.jpg

 

We heard the story that these two were scouts for the army when they met their end.

 

Shirley~

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Our old local church cemetery looks beautiful in the spring when it is carpeted with lilies. The graveyard is still in use, but the old church is no longer used. Don't have any pics, but will see if I can find a link.

 

link St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Church with springtime array of fawn lilies .. , Metchosin, British Columbia, Canada

Edited by popokiiti
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These two were taken while our family was caching with ODragon and Rachelhead in Woodlands Cemetery, Philadelphia:

One thing I don't get, why do Odragon and Rachelhead always geocache together?

Because they love each other? :unsure::ph34r:

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Abandoned cemeteries, all found while caching, near St. Louis.

 

0986ef4f-cb61-4bcc-baab-27aa79e8e56a.jpg

 

88d04722-e387-42df-985d-c6dcc2c060fe.jpg

 

3a15c63d-7070-4df2-90ce-658b4e2a0c89.jpg

 

dccc7db5-f6dd-4fdc-b048-114862e8e390.jpg

 

9cbc09ac-5d42-4c36-85b9-fa36773f5391.jpg

 

bd8fe5ef-a4b8-4074-9b57-50dd1f097965.jpg

 

fa6b7592-898f-48a5-9cdb-214c2cf59c48.jpg

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I've found a few cemetery caches, but this one is my favourite ( GC13RX6 ):

 

f957912c-1cd1-4798-a4a5-ac1a7c6b7a2f.jpg

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A still-active cemetery near me with stones at least as old as Michigan's statehood. Most of it is normal-looking, but you'll find some mostly-buried stones peaking through the grass. This cache is there.

d9e2e909-4f49-475c-af0c-b01a8a7d4a5f.JPG

5cd54a41-b027-4a70-aa07-96c4c39f197c.JPG

7fe34e34-3d4c-4120-bffc-ee878e225e21.JPG

 

Another nearby cemetery, almost as old. The stones are in sad shape -- some are reinforced by metal, some pieced back together with concrete, and some half missing. This cache is there.

d7a0b1d1-8774-4e72-9902-2b3680a5b09f.JPG

5c318f83-2678-4a6d-84ab-c4b44fe43243.JPG

291d2eef-cb8f-4977-8e79-bb8b4806407e.JPG

 

Not a cemetery exactly, but an odd find on the way to a cache

34bca6db-f52c-4d9c-b905-eae3cb3f441c.jpg

Edited by Dinoprophet
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Tree stump headstones were very popular in my area toward the end of the 19th century. I found some information about them on this site:

 

 

Tree-Stump Tombstones

Tree-stump tombstones depict a lifelike tree and is traditionally carved out of limestone or marble. This tombstone first appeared in the 1870's and was popular for approximately sixty years. Seen in Europe and the United States, these carvings qualify as folk art. The tree-stump design shows a living tree that has been cut down, suggesting that the individual was also cut down in the prime of life. Branches are also seen to be cut-off close to the stump, symbolising other family members who have died before their time. In some instances the initials of these family members appear to be carved into these cut-off limbs.

 

Inscriptions are cut into the "wood" where the bark has been cut away, or more often, a scroll appears to nailed to the stump, or suspended from a rope hanger. Various flowers and ivy are often carved as offerings at the base, or growing around the stump. An assortment of items are often seen on top of the stump, ranging from a cross, bible, anchor, flowers, or even the name and dates for the individual buried.

.t-tombstone1.gif

 

 

 

The one below is from http://coord.info/GC1FVNH

 

ff63f535-57a6-462f-8dcb-b1b2048382c6.jpg

 

The rest of these were taken in Wisconsin at http://coord.info/GC1HCJC

 

cd9233ed-701e-449a-926b-10ec76d3c50e.jpg

 

997e8a10-991e-45c7-8c57-7c92f9b8f76a.jpg

 

69261b4c-0c3b-45a2-b80a-7f63ffb6ef49.jpg

Those are Woodsmen of the World headstones......... Waymarking has a category for them.

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97b75aa2-d2f8-4a8a-b736-7aae8e5ad148.jpgMy picture of a cemetery section devoted to some British lads who died in training far from home. Cache (now archived) was hidden along the right side of the photo.

 

21aa41ff-88f6-47ea-95bb-7c5b2b10a530.jpg Tensions ran high in the years after the Civil War. Proof in this quiet location in North Texas.

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Found these in Watkins Glen after GWIX

The cache page said they couldn't see their pictures once they got home.

Spooky Tombstone

9qk4yb.jpg

Watkins Glen Famous #1

Apparently this was someone on the Titanic. I didn't watch the movie since I knew how it ended.

2hzilqq.jpg

Edited by hallycat
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Sleepy Hollow, NY

14bhlxt.jpg

 

son2px.jpg

15ein8j.jpg

2dqom6f.jpg

Edited by hallycat
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