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Any cachers do pottery?


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For my signature items, I have been working on small clay figures. I am looking at a kiln but have some questions. I am looking at a Paragon E9S electric kiln. Looks like it has a max temperature of 1650F. Can it get to cone 06?

 

(It's on topic, Moderators, really, it is!!!)

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For my signature items, I have been working on small clay figures. I am looking at a kiln but have some questions. I am looking at a Paragon E9S electric kiln. Looks like it has a max temperature of 1650F. Can it get to cone 06?

 

(It's on topic, Moderators, really, it is!!!)

 

Hey you're in the Golden Horseshoe. So am I. I don't know about the kiln, but I just wanted to say your future sig item sounds terrific. I hope I find one someday. :)

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For my signature items, I have been working on small clay figures. I am looking at a kiln but have some questions. I am looking at a Paragon E9S electric kiln. Looks like it has a max temperature of 1650F. Can it get to cone 06?

 

(It's on topic, Moderators, really, it is!!!)

 

Not into pottery but I really appreciate handmade sig items from cachers.

 

I have 2 pottery sig items in my collection. Both were done by LAmudbug many years ago. I don't think he caches anymore.

 

Post some pics when you are finished. B)

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For my signature items, I have been working on small clay figures. I am looking at a kiln but have some questions. I am looking at a Paragon E9S electric kiln. Looks like it has a max temperature of 1650F. Can it get to cone 06?

 

(It's on topic, Moderators, really, it is!!!)

Nope.

 

Cone 06 is in the 1800F range.

 

Here's a reference that should help.

http://www.ortonceramic.com/resources/reference/pdf/wall_chart_degreeF.pdf

 

I like your idea to use ceramics as a sig item. That's what I did. You will get lots of compliments.

Edited by bittsen
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That is unfortunate. I thought more went into cones than just temperature. I thought you could fire it at a lower temperate for longer periods of time...

 

Hi Viridios,

 

Within limits, what you said is true. I don't know though if in actual practice you could get to cone 06 in a kiln limited to 1650 degrees. Even if you could, it would be bad for the kiln to fire it beyond its rated limit - you use up the heating elements very fast by doing that, and it might possibly be bad for the switches too (if it's a manual) though I'm not certain about that. If there is a ceramics shop in your area, you might pay them to fire your things for you, or if you know someone else with a kiln they might help you out.

 

If you want to make the investment, you can get a small test kiln (some of which are small enough to run off household current) for a few hundred dollars, even one which will go to cone 10. It's always a good idea to have a kiln which is rated significantly higher than the range within which you plan to fire - you lengthen the life of the elements that way. Check out the online clay suppliers and see what you find - Axner, Bailey, Clay-King, Big Ceramic Store, Continental, Laguna, among others. I like the idea of making your own signature items - good luck with it.

 

wheelturner

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I am looking at a Paragon E9S for $50. I have been having a hard time finding much out about it. So I should look for one that fired to around 2000F, right?

 

Apparently the Paragon E9S is a very old model, and one which doesn't have an on/off switch - you just plug it in and it heats up very fast,and when your cone goes over you unplug. You'd have to be very sure that your items were completely dry before firing them up in such a kiln, because any lurking moisture would certainly explode your pieces at that rate of temperature rise.

 

I have an Aim test kiln myself, and I've just been looking at what they offer these days. They have several small kilns with firing chambers of various sizes - 6.5" X 6.5" X 4.5" high or 8" X 8" X 4.5" high, or 8" X 8" X 9" high, prices between $265 and $370 U.S., don't know what that would be Canadian. These run on household current, and the two larger ones can go to cone 10. Any of them would work well at cone 06. (Remember that cone 06 is a lower temp. than cone 01 or cone 1 and up. 2000 F is around cone 03/02.) These all have an infinite switch (as opposed to a 3-way switch), which will let you start the kiln at very low heat and allow your things to dry completely before turning the heat up.

 

A clay item having a thickness of more than say 1/2 inch should be made hollow, with at least a needle-tool hole between the interior cavity and the exterior. This will allow the air in the cavity to escape as the clay dries and shrinks, to avoid puffing it up like a balloon or cracking it, and will help it to dry thoroughly before bisquing.

 

There are a couple of good books out now about electric kiln firing - The Electric Kiln by Harry Fraser, and Electric Kiln Ceramics by Richard Zakin. It would be a great idea to get one of them to consult as you go along. They would introduce you to the basics and give good general guidance.

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