Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
CacheFreakTim

Starting fires

Recommended Posts

This is going to be one of those things you try in your backyard until you get the hang of it before depending on it in the backcountry.

 

My preference is to have a lighter, REI long sulfur-coated stick waterproofed matches, and esbit stove pellets. I don't want to have to try to spark a fire when my hands are already shaking from a long hike and camp setup. I want fire started almost as soon as I have enough wood bundle and tinder to handle it.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post

There is always the handy Flint and Steel pocket kits. Something like this

http://www.thinkgeek.com/gadgets/tools/754d/

 

You could buy or make your own fire piston. You can find instructions here.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Illustrated-amp-Detailed-Guide-To-Making-A-Fire-/

 

Keep a ziplock baggy with dryer lint in it and your good to go with a fire.

 

Most good methods of fire starting involve having something with you to help things along. For a good fire bow its good to have a bit of string like a shoe lace and a knife so you can get it set up.

Share this post


Link to post

If not using a lighter or matches, I really like a good magnesium fire starter. Pretty easy to use, and pretty reliable.

 

But in all honesty, there's really no reason to not have fire starting stuff with you on any hike or outing that would take you somewhere that you might get caught overnight and need a fire. My pack ALWAYS has a waterproof match container with REI sulfur coated waterproof matches, a good ole Bic, and several small pill baggies that contain dryer lint impregnated with petroleum jelly.

 

Even in wet conditions I've always been able to get my fires going, but luckily they've all been in practice in my yard.

Share this post


Link to post

Try your local library. Most outdoor survival and camping books have a section on fire starting. If your library does not have a book on that topic most share between other local library's, maybe they can borrow one for you. Also bring matches as a back up or you could find yourself very cold. :P

Share this post


Link to post

There is always the handy Flint and Steel pocket kits. Something like this

http://www.thinkgeek.com/gadgets/tools/754d/

 

You could buy or make your own fire piston. You can find instructions here.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Illustrated-amp-Detailed-Guide-To-Making-A-Fire-/

 

Keep a ziplock baggy with dryer lint in it and your good to go with a fire.

 

Most good methods of fire starting involve having something with you to help things along. For a good fire bow its good to have a bit of string like a shoe lace and a knife so you can get it set up.

 

Umm...have you ever made or used a fire bow? I have and it isn't just hey-nonny-nonny, a string and a few bits of wood and presto! you have a fire. Primitive people who make these have highly developed skills and master the technique after practice.

 

It is a skill that I'm thinking folks aren't going to master in a bad situation.

 

A pack of matches and a few stubs of candles in a ziplock bag beats it all hollow.

Edited by ATMouse

Share this post


Link to post

There is always the handy Flint and Steel pocket kits. Something like this

http://www.thinkgeek.com/gadgets/tools/754d/

 

You could buy or make your own fire piston. You can find instructions here.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Illustrated-amp-Detailed-Guide-To-Making-A-Fire-/

 

Keep a ziplock baggy with dryer lint in it and your good to go with a fire.

 

Most good methods of fire starting involve having something with you to help things along. For a good fire bow its good to have a bit of string like a shoe lace and a knife so you can get it set up.

 

Umm...have you ever made or used a fire bow? I have and it isn't just hey-nonny-nonny, a string and a few bits of wood and presto! you have a fire. Primitive people who make these have highly developed skills and master the technique after practice.

 

It is a skill that I'm thinking folks aren't going to master in a bad situation.

 

A pack of matches and a few stubs of candles in a ziplock bag beats it all hollow.

Didn't mean to imply it was easy to do. I should have been clear about that an a bit more in depth about it.

 

I've used the method several times back when i was a Boy Scout. It certainly isn't an easy task to master. Especially if your stuck out in the wilderness and are pretty worn out. It takes a good bit of energy to get things going after the long setup time. You gotta choose your sticks to use. You'll need to carve a socket for the top of the stick to sit in to protect your hand. At the base you need a good piece of wood with a socket and a notched carved in it so the stick can sit in it and build up heat from friction as you pull the bow back and forth. The notch is there to allow your tinder easy access to the hot spot. Even after all of that it can be difficult to get the bow going stead and keep it from flipping off the stick.

 

As TotumLake mentioned many fire starting methods take allot of backyard practice.

Share this post


Link to post

There is always the handy Flint and Steel pocket kits. Something like this

http://www.thinkgeek.com/gadgets/tools/754d/

 

You could buy or make your own fire piston. You can find instructions here.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Illustrated-amp-Detailed-Guide-To-Making-A-Fire-/

 

Keep a ziplock baggy with dryer lint in it and your good to go with a fire.

 

Most good methods of fire starting involve having something with you to help things along. For a good fire bow its good to have a bit of string like a shoe lace and a knife so you can get it set up.

 

Umm...have you ever made or used a fire bow? I have and it isn't just hey-nonny-nonny, a string and a few bits of wood and presto! you have a fire. Primitive people who make these have highly developed skills and master the technique after practice.

 

It is a skill that I'm thinking folks aren't going to master in a bad situation.

 

A pack of matches and a few stubs of candles in a ziplock bag beats it all hollow.

It takes a good bit of energy to get things going after the long setup time.

 

:laughing:

 

Boy, you ain't kidding! I remember how just plain HAPPY I was when I finally got a bit of burning material going.

 

Still, I know how to make one now. I figure everything you learn is a Good Thing. Please God I'll never have to actually do it under survival conditions, but I know I can.

Share this post


Link to post

Personally, I like the flint-and-steel kits (the ThinkGeek ones are decent) or a magnesium kit.

However, I *ALWAYS* have matches (preferably waterproof) in a ziploc on hand just in case and a lighter to back that up.

 

I try not to use the lighter, as I don't want to waste fuel, and I prefer knowing that I started a fire with very little "technology." I often pack in cheese wrapped in red wax, which I find makes an excellent fire starter and the cheese is a great snack after hiking in ;)

 

I have not ever tried a fire bow... though I've often wanted to. It just doesn't seem easy enough to me. Maybe I'll try some day in the safety and comfort of civilization.

Share this post


Link to post

YMMV and if you've successfully used it kudos to you. I threw away my magnesium brick years back. The slightest breeze upset the small pile too many times when Criminal and I actually tried to use this and other "great items" one wintery day and the recommended pile burned much too quickly to be useful. Unless the tinder is super dry (in the PNW?) the flash in the pan is typically not enough. I'll use the matches before the lighter, but sometimes in the dark, when you can't find the headlamp, the lighter is the preferred quick method to get a candle lit. :)

Share this post


Link to post

I recently found these fire starting pages on Wildwood Survival. There's a ton of useful information in there.

 

TL, we need to do another fire starting workshop. We learned a lot from the last one, specifically how hard it is to, and bad we suck at, making fire.

Edited by Criminal

Share this post


Link to post

Yup we do and we should soon while the conditions are worth fighting against. :)

Certainly before the fire becomes the opposition, and you are trying to figure out how to put it out!

 

Which reminds me it's time around here as well... to consider both aspects. I find almost no one here considers extinguishing their campfires as important. Even though they can and are held responsible for any damage they might cause. Of course bush people do that by nature... it's the visitors who seem to be careless with fire.

 

Have fun with your practice.

 

Doug 7rxc (VE7RXC)

Share this post


Link to post

I've run into a few camp sites where the camp fire is left burning and during a season when a single errant spark can cause a lot of damage. Fortunately, we had our 5 gallon bucket full of river water each time and took care of it and advised the ranger of the vehicle license for further action as deemed appropriate. You can tell which sites are going to be trouble.

Share this post


Link to post

Like others have said....practice before depending on your fire making supplies and learned skills.

 

For instance....you determine that a Bic, waterproof matches, magnesium fire rod, fire drill etc. are the things to have in the pack. Now, take each fire method to the backyard and successfully make a roaring fire with each in fair dry weather.

 

Next, wait until it's wet/cold, get wet/cold and try making a fire. The exercize will show you not to wait until your hands are too cold to flick a Bic or strike a match.

 

Totem, I have nothing but good to say about the magnesium fire blocks. I've started every fire I intended to with one. One of those and cedar bark tinder is the bomb. In particular if a small bit of paper is available for a shaving catch. (I don't smoke anything, but some cig-rolling paper is perfect) Even in the wet. Of course, I do live in the fair Southest...not on some howling snow clad mountain range like you. :)

Edited by Woodstramp

Share this post


Link to post

Like others have said....practice before depending on your fire making supplies and learned skills.

 

For instance....you determine that a Bic, waterproof matches, magnesium fire rod, fire drill etc. are the things to have in the pack. Now, take each fire method to the backyard and successfully make a roaring fire with each in fair dry weather.

 

Next, wait until it's wet/cold, get wet/cold and try making a fire. The exercize will show you not to wait until your hands are too cold to flick a Bic or strike a match.

 

Totem, I have nothing but good to say about the magnesium fire blocks. I've started every fire I intended to with one. One of those and cedar bark tinder is the bomb. In particular if a small bit of paper is available for a shaving catch. (I don't smoke anything, but some cig-rolling paper is perfect) Even in the wet. Of course, I do live in the fair Southest...not on some howling snow clad mountain range like you. :)

:lol: I really did try to give it a fair shake. I had built wind breaks and even used my hat to catch the flakes. I used to carry it around all the time based on best given advise by someone else. But you're right, it is definitely an environmental thing. What works great in one spot is going to be useless in another and the only way anyone will ever really know is to practice the craft and get rid of some very critical assumptions.

Share this post


Link to post

In the end you really gotta have some supplies on hand to get a fire going. Be it matches, a light, Flint/steal, or some steel wool and a 9V battery. Fire may be basic and easy now with all the tools we have but it wasn't so easy 1k+ years ago.

Share this post


Link to post

But a basic need in any case is having all your materials close at hand when you start. Be sure to gather enough wood to help get the fire started and sustain the fire for a couple of hours. Have some good dry Kindling (wood shavings, dryer lint, cotton balls) to take the spark/flame and then small twigs and sticks for tinder to help feed the flame. Then work your way up to some logs. There are several setups you can do like build a small tepee or log cabin that you can feed your light kindling into and get the fire going.

Edited by mpilchfamily

Share this post


Link to post

In the end you really gotta have some supplies on hand to get a fire going. Be it matches, a light, Flint/steal, or some steel wool and a 9V battery. Fire may be basic and easy now with all the tools we have but it wasn't so easy 1k+ years ago.

Who carries a 9 volt battery or steel wool when they're hiking or backpacking?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post

Totem,

 

You said: "....to practice the craft and get rid of some very critical assumptions."

 

You nailed that one. I recall thinking one time, years ago, "How hard could it be to make a fire using a hand drill?" Just two sticks, right? Even saw this wild African tribe dude "just whoop up" a fire like that on TV. Found out that you need special materials, etc. (Mullein and cedar in my experiments) I've always been a strong fellow and have rough tradesman's hands. After exhaustion and blistered hands I found out that hand-drill fire making takes tenacity, an animal's strength and a focus I don't posess.

Share this post


Link to post

Exactly. Carrying a few matches and a sparky stick around is only good if you can use them to reach your goal of creating a usable fire. Having a head full of fire craft knowledge and actually making a fire with what you actually have with you are two entirely different things. We went out one cold morning and hiked into the woods up near Enumclaw to give it a try, and although we were able to make a little fire, it didn’t last and provided no warmth. Everything was either wet, or wet and frozen.

 

This topic came up in another thread here somewhere and people chimed in with lots of advice, some of it pretty silly. What do you actually carry in your pack that can help you make a fire? Practical advice, not theory, is what we need because even the best theory won’t keep you warm. Being able to make a spark is easy, the tools to do so are very light and take up little room in your pack. The problem is that here in the Pacific Northwest, where it’s wet much of the time, the physical exertion of making a spark does more to keep you warm than the spark itself ever will. There isn’t much usable tinder that will ignite from a little spark for nine months out of the year. Old man’s beard is all over, and great tinder when/if it’s dry. Most of us carry at least some kind of tinder, like cotton balls or lint w/vaseline, or a commercial version thereof, and there are several items you may already carry that will ignite with just a spark (don’t overlook those).

 

Once you have that, then what? Kindling size wood is plentiful, but again, wet. Larger fuel wood may or may not be plentiful, but it’s probably going to need enough fire and hot coals to dry it out before it’ll burn enough to keep you warm. We found that running around and gathering supplies kept us a lot warmer than the little five minute fire we made did.

 

We learned a lot about what works and what doesn’t for our area the last time we went out. I took a walk last Saturday and gathered some materials to take home and practice. I got nowhere with my flint/steel, because even though it was a sunny day, everything was still damp. Using a chemical tinder right from my pack I was able to make a roaring fire. I intend to learn and practice the bow – drill method, so that without anything but my knife and the 550 cord around the sheath, I can hopefully make a fire. The Northwest is great for finding water and staying hydrated, not so much for making fire though. The Southwest is the opposite. Of the recent local lost hiker stories I’ve read, I don’t remember ever reading that the hiker was found sitting beside a campfire waiting for rescue.

 

The question isn’t what do you know, but what can you do? The only way you can truthfully answer that question is to go out and try.

Share this post


Link to post

Criminal,

 

My rule for wet environment fires has two parts. Firewood that is dead, but still hanging and hopefully from a resinous tree like pines/cedars. Some punky blown down trees will have a fine resinous heart too....just club off the punky stuff. Second part is carefully watching that heat generated is concentrated drying larger wet stuff that is above. Watch it like a hawk. I know you guys probably way more hiking experience than I ever will, but I can make and keep a fire.

 

One guy, who has some fire making talent is the fellow who wrote that 98drees book, Cody Lundin. He and a fellow named Dave Canterbury have a survival show called Dual Survival. I watch him making fire and think: "Perfect...that fellow knows his stuff." (His fuel collections for an all-nighter never seem to be enough for my tastes, but that would be the only critisism.) He's purty mean at wild shelter building,too. I don't get the "barefoot" thing, but he's good.

Share this post


Link to post

Totem,

 

You said: "....to practice the craft and get rid of some very critical assumptions."

 

You nailed that one. I recall thinking one time, years ago, "How hard could it be to make a fire using a hand drill?" Just two sticks, right? Even saw this wild African tribe dude "just whoop up" a fire like that on TV. Found out that you need special materials, etc. (Mullein and cedar in my experiments) I've always been a strong fellow and have rough tradesman's hands. After exhaustion and blistered hands I found out that hand-drill fire making takes tenacity, an animal's strength and a focus I don't posess.

 

Of course... it helps to know the 'cheat' there... it isn't really a cheat, it's part of the basic process... I haven't done any drill fire lighting in a long time, I did do some of the bow drill type. Learned from a native that the secret often rests in having some sand to enhance the friction. just a light sprinkle on the bearing surface helps heat things up greatly, assuming you don't have wet soggy wood there to start... most people using that carry a pre made block for that purpose. I have to give this a try again... someday soon... Every thing else applies though, from tinder to practice practice practice.

 

Anyone else ever try using snowballs for lighting a fire in place of tinder... I used to use carbide lights for caving, but one time I had one along on a survival training course for some of our Air Cadets... no one was having much luck getting a fire going and looked for assistance... I went to my pack for fire starting gear, matches... then palmed a bit of calcium carbide from my storage bottle, and proceeded to make a very wet snowball with the carbide inside... placed the snowball under the kindling and lit it with a match while telling them they had to use the right tinder... snowballs... it lit up vigorously... of course acetylene gas does that. THEN we showed them how to do it for real, after they warmed up a bit.

 

Doug 7rxc

Share this post


Link to post

Criminal,

 

My rule for wet environment fires has two parts. Firewood that is dead, but still hanging and hopefully from a resinous tree like pines/cedars. Some punky blown down trees will have a fine resinous heart too....just club off the punky stuff. Second part is carefully watching that heat generated is concentrated drying larger wet stuff that is above. Watch it like a hawk. I know you guys probably way more hiking experience than I ever will, but I can make and keep a fire.

I agree with everything you've said. Up here if there's wood on the ground, it's almost always useless for burning. Standing dead wood is our best option. Prior to the Enumclaw thing I did a short hike that turned out to be much shorter than I thought. Since I had driven all that distance I decided to see if I could get a fire going for practice. I got lucky and found a pitch-wood stump and had a great fire in a short time.

Share this post


Link to post

Criminal,

 

My rule for wet environment fires has two parts. Firewood that is dead, but still hanging and hopefully from a resinous tree like pines/cedars. Some punky blown down trees will have a fine resinous heart too....just club off the punky stuff. Second part is carefully watching that heat generated is concentrated drying larger wet stuff that is above. Watch it like a hawk. I know you guys probably way more hiking experience than I ever will, but I can make and keep a fire.

 

One guy, who has some fire making talent is the fellow who wrote that 98drees book, Cody Lundin. He and a fellow named Dave Canterbury have a survival show called Dual Survival. I watch him making fire and think: "Perfect...that fellow knows his stuff." (His fuel collections for an all-nighter never seem to be enough for my tastes, but that would be the only critisism.) He's purty mean at wild shelter building,too. I don't get the "barefoot" thing, but he's good.

I've seen that show. I'm pretty impressed with his skills and endurance.

Share this post


Link to post

Criminal,

 

Your firewood sources might be sucky, but you NW guys sure got some purty land up there to tromp. Envious. Hope to lay eyes on it one day.

 

Totem,

 

I like that show because they think things out....'cetp the Cody guy needs some boots. :)

Share this post


Link to post

Harbor Freight has Magnesium Blocks with Spark Sticks on sale for $1.99. These work great for starting fires, but do require some practice and a good "birds nest" to get a fire going. These are light and effective, and really a good idea to have as a back up source of ignition.

Share this post


Link to post

Conditions: WET! It had been raining for days and was raining the day I went out.

 

The first thing I needed was a stick with which to baton my knife. Easy right? Except I wrenched my back somehow. Not bad mind you, but I tugged on a tree and my back let me know I shouldn’t do so while standing at the angle I was standing. If I had just walked it off I probably would have been fine, but several hours crouched down left me almost crippled. Anyway, moving the project forward…

 

Once I had a batoning stick, I set out to find some big sticks to split and make into little sticks. Without getting into too much boring detail, I split the big sticks open and made little sticks and slivers. I found a big stump that looked like it had been hit by lightning. Most of it was rotten and punky but there was some good wood as well, although the grain was wavy and it didn’t split well. Those are the chunks of wood around the outside in the picture:

Fire1.png

 

With enough kindling to get the whole thing going, I made a little log cabin with the heartwood just as the rain began again. I used one of the chemical type tinder I have in my pack, and a storm match and got my little pile of shavings and sticks to light….sort of. It took a lot attention and blowing but it finally took off, although every time the wind blew the treetops, a fat drop of water would plunk right into the fire and almost kill it. I never gathered any fuel wood, mostly as a time saving thing, but my little fire was self-supporting.

Fire2.png

 

It was at this point I headed back to the big stump to grab some fuel wood. I was pulling some from the inside when my nose detected the wonderful almost turpentine smell of pitch-wood. Could it be? Yes! I took a large plank of pitch-wood back to my fire and split it up into smaller pieces. It was like gasoline on the fire!

Fire3.png

Fire4.png

 

Despite the wet weather, wet wood, and sore back, I was able to get a good fire going with very little supplies, and a blazing inferno with the pitch-wood.

Share this post


Link to post

(Is it just me just me or is there the ghostly outline of a man in the flames on the last pic?)

 

Criminal,

 

First, good job on the fire. Considering the ground there looks like a sponge.

 

Second, you mention using a "Chemical Tinder". What is that?

 

Along this same vein...a while back one of our machinists was turning a part on his lathe. It was black Delrin plastic. A fire-bug buddy on our crew took a small squashed palmful and lit it with his Bic. That little pile of shavings burned a blue flame for almost 15 minutes....slow and even until it sputtered out. Might be worth investigating for tinder. Not as spark catchy as charred cotton, but impressive.

Share this post


Link to post

In view of the fires recently causing serious problems in UK, due to ususually dry weather, I'd say "think very carefully about when and where you choose to light a fire" and perhaps not lighting a fire or clearing vegetation before using a very small and controllable camping stove might be more appropriate. I work in a country park in Cambridgeshire, East Anglia (driest part of England / UK) where we take anything for burning to an old railway trailer, which keeps fire in control. Currently, we're patrolling to look for illegal barbeques and enforcing use of one barbeque area which has to be booked - if it's full, there's no alternative.

Share this post


Link to post
(Is it just me just me or is there the ghostly outline of a man in the flames on the last pic?)

It must be me then' date=' you're the second person to say that but no matter how long I stare I just cant see it.

 

What Im calling chemical tinder is some commercial product that is nothing more than vaseline and cotton, about the size of a thimble. As an aside, I brought home several large pieces of pitch-wood to play with. I used my knife to scrape some pitch fuzz off last night and was able to get it to a flame with just a spark.

 

In view of the fires recently causing serious problems in UK, due to ususually dry weather, I'd say "think very carefully about when and where you choose to light a fire"...

Thats not been a problem here, quite the opposite in fact; its been one of the wettest Springs in recent memory. Nevertheless, between the fire, the knife in the first picture, and the Glock stuffed with 15 rounds of 10mm on my pack, it sounds like I wouldnt fit in very well with the law over there.

 

EDIT to add: Here's a great (albeit long) essay on how jolly old England gave its civil rights away.

Edited by Criminal

Share this post


Link to post

I see the figure in the fire as well. Think of a person wearing a death cloak. The figure's left hand is up and parallel with the shoulder, pointing towards the viewer. The right hand is down by the side, the sleeve is pulled up from the wrist a bit and the cloak is draped about the firewood.

Edited by TotemLake

Share this post


Link to post

I used to go out more in the winter times. Back before I decided I'm not a fan of cold. On my outings in the winter I'd occasionally start fires because doing that with wet and cold wood is even more fun.

 

Anyhow, I didn't do the fancy tools things. I had some water proof matches as my back up plan. I smoked at the time so I typically had a zippo on me me which was very useful. And as a back up to the zippo (good smoker doesn't risk not having flame) I had a modified bic lighter. It's cold here a lot and flicking a bic with their little safety thing over the flicker is a pain in the cold. I'd pry the little safety thing off and would then have an easily flickable bic. If that's your back up plan pull the safety thing off.

Share this post


Link to post

I see the figure in the fire as well. Think of a person wearing a death cloak. The figure's left hand is up and parallel with the shoulder, pointing towards the viewer. The right hand is down by the side, the sleeve is pulled up from the wrist a bit and the cloak is draped about the firewood.

 

Seemed a bit familiar for some reason, I didn't see it quite like that but almost... this is sort of what I see and hear!

 

Firenu.jpg

 

... I... am your FIRE!

 

What's burning in there anyway, the smoke is having an effect on us...

 

Doug 7rxc

Share this post


Link to post

Since you added a few... well... one last effort, albeit a minor one.

 

No effort expended this time, just to show what I was seeing... now turning on the exhaust fan to HIGH.

 

Being on a Star Wars path, this one was visible right off.

 

Fire6nu.jpg

 

I still remember the words uttered shortly after... " I thought they smelled bad on the OUTSIDE "

 

The other fire I wasn't sure what it was at first, then came clarity,

well sort of. sorry for the hasty drawing, kept burning my hand! :lol:

 

Fire5nu.jpg

 

You are having a BAD Signal Day when you see this one! Seems it's a Hell Frog. :blink:

 

I'm done now... Thanks for the diversion from serious.

 

Doug 7rxc

Share this post


Link to post

Recovering this topic, reminded me that I had lost a few images when my HOST vanished overnight... Since one can't edit this far along, I decided to repost these 'new' versions of the fire interpretations. I don't intend to do it for every pic I've posted in various topics, but some of the ones I liked doing... I don't intend to do any more... maybe. Maybe a different forum if it calls for it. :rolleyes:

 

Post #34

DVIaF.png

 

Post #36A

HSride.png

 

Post #36B

HFrog.png

 

Fairly easy to roll back a bit...and link them up. Now I'm done with that again.

 

On the topic, it's probably a good time of year to refresh those bush skills related to fires, including putting them out properly.

 

Doug 7rxc

Share this post


Link to post

Depends on how primative ot advance you want starting a fire to be - the challenge so to speak. In a survival situation, you obviously want not only the easiest and best way, but a way to do it multiple times and multiple ways. Everyone posted great guides that should followed.

 

Me, I am never without a flint and mag fire started in my pack. $3 at rei. That gives you a very high temp spark even in the wettest condition, you can submerge that thing in the water and mud and it will start spark.

 

Secondly, you will need a tinder of some sort. Again, fire starting kits have these kinds of things, but it never hurts to collect this stuff in the wild. Old mans beard is great. Fiber shavings from a lot of conifers (like cedar). Pine bar is great too - the resin buts great. Birch bark is great. Anything really that can be broken up into a larger surface area that is fluffy and flamable. Dry and easy to catch a spark, airy enough to get oxygen and long enough to old a flame to cacth your kindling.

 

Third is your kindling which is just what it is - smaller pieces of wood/twigs. Dead and dry.

 

Lastly of course are you logs. Of course your best are quarter logs (the kind of stuff you see bundled outide of super markets) just because it is dry dead and the fuel is exposed. Fully covered logs will always take longer to catch - in the wild though, if you can get both kinds of logs all the better. And of course a bushmans rule of thumb is once you feel you have "enough" get 3 or 4 times more.

 

On of the biggest things you need to be aware of besides your fuels, is how you arrange it. Different builds depends on the type of woods you have and how fast it cacthes and how long it burns for. The classic arrangement is the teepee. No matter which ou go with, you always want it to get as muc oxygen as possible but not spread apart - the more compact it is, the hotter it will burn, but it will burn faster of course.

 

And alwas ALWAYS make sure you know the rules whereever you are building a fire. I recommend aganst doing in anywhere other than a fire pit in a campground unless you are in a survival situation and even then, you have to make sure you build it properly so you ont start a forest fire - not only is that dangerous all around but if you get caught in a forest fire you started, chances are you arent getting out alive. I would highly recommend survial training where they teach this specifically.

Share this post


Link to post

I should also add the again, if you must build a fire, dig a fire pit. You should clear the ground 4 - 6 feet around the circumference of where the fire will be (this ensures coals and embers that escape wont have any ground fuel to catch. And the pit itself should be a cupl of inches deep. A hatchet or digging stick works nice for this. If you can, use rocks around the pit. And of course, dont build near any potential fueld (i.e. deadwood, cloe to bases of trees, low branches, etc.). Have dirt, sand or water close by in case an ember catches something. Oh and of course, when your done with your fire, spread everything apart, pee on it, put dirt and sand over the coals and embers, dump extra water on it.

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

×
×
  • Create New...