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Logging your own cache as a find


_Wolverine
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I have been wondering lately why folks here are so worried about a cacher "cheating" by logging a cache they own as a find yet defending 1,000 or so finds on a power trail as legitimate finds and an acceptible way to cache. I know, the finders did not place the caches in the power trails. But they found essentially the same hide over and over and over again. It seems that in some cases they took the cache they found and left another. How in the world does a finder know what they did or did not find when things like this are going on? There can be any number of reasons for a cache owner to log their own hide as a find. There really can be only one reason for cachers to log 1,000 or so caches on a power trail. Numbers padding. It may be an excellent adventure but the only real reason to do it is to add many, many finds in a short period of time. Numbers padding. If it isn't about numbers padding the cachers would be mapping out 24 hour caching routes to find as many caches as they can in their local areas, which is still numbers chasing, but not numbers padding.

 

I doubt you'll find many, if any cacher, that is against logging your own cache, that is also pro power trail.

 

What does logging your own cache do for you, besides increase your stat. Explain that to me and I might see the other side.

 

I suppose that if you log your own cache you might be willing to power log. Not really sure if the two are that connected.

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I also think its bad form.

It happens in my area, I once told the person that he shouldnt sign his own caches and the answer I got is that its their cache and he can... I left it at that...

 

Anyway, something that people forget is that numbers bring statut.

How many of you will give the same respect to a cacher with 100 finds compared to someone with 10000 finds?

 

So in a way the game is about the numbers. Numbers gets you respect and allow you to climb the geocaching community ladder. :)

So someone who logs their two or three hides is gaining status? Vs. someone who chases a couple of power trails? :blink:

 

I will happily find a way to earn the respect of my local cachers by being a good and faithful participant in the game and not be concerned with my find or hide counts.

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I have been wondering lately why folks here are so worried about a cacher "cheating" by logging a cache they own as a find yet defending 1,000 or so finds on a power trail as legitimate finds and an acceptible way to cache. I know, the finders did not place the caches in the power trails. But they found essentially the same hide over and over and over again. It seems that in some cases they took the cache they found and left another. How in the world does a finder know what they did or did not find when things like this are going on? There can be any number of reasons for a cache owner to log their own hide as a find. There really can be only one reason for cachers to log 1,000 or so caches on a power trail. Numbers padding. It may be an excellent adventure but the only real reason to do it is to add many, many finds in a short period of time. Numbers padding. If it isn't about numbers padding the cachers would be mapping out 24 hour caching routes to find as many caches as they can in their local areas, which is still numbers chasing, but not numbers padding.

 

I doubt you'll find many, if any cacher, that is against logging your own cache, that is also pro power trail.

 

What does logging your own cache do for you, besides increase your stat. Explain that to me and I might see the other side.

 

I suppose that if you log your own cache you might be willing to power log. Not really sure if the two are that connected.

How about my wife and kids hid a cache for my birthday and I went and found it? I had no info other than what was posted on the cache page. We have a "team" account so I posted a found it log on a cache hidden by "me".

 

I certainly am not a cacher who is all about the numbers.

Edited by WRASTRO
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It really doesn't matter, and the only people who are bothered by it are those who operate under the delusion that they are competing with everybody else and insist on looking for "cheating" in completely benign, neutral actions.

 

I get the whole 'what does it matter?'...as a point of argument. It doesn't really convince me as to why anyone should - or would want to, other than the obvious.

 

I've said it before - if you want the stat for your own cache, say so. I'll have much more respect for your honesty.

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I have been wondering lately why folks here are so worried about a cacher "cheating" by logging a cache they own as a find yet defending 1,000 or so finds on a power trail as legitimate finds and an acceptible way to cache. I know, the finders did not place the caches in the power trails. But they found essentially the same hide over and over and over again. It seems that in some cases they took the cache they found and left another. How in the world does a finder know what they did or did not find when things like this are going on? There can be any number of reasons for a cache owner to log their own hide as a find. There really can be only one reason for cachers to log 1,000 or so caches on a power trail. Numbers padding. It may be an excellent adventure but the only real reason to do it is to add many, many finds in a short period of time. Numbers padding. If it isn't about numbers padding the cachers would be mapping out 24 hour caching routes to find as many caches as they can in their local areas, which is still numbers chasing, but not numbers padding.

 

I doubt you'll find many, if any cacher, that is against logging your own cache, that is also pro power trail.

 

What does logging your own cache do for you, besides increase your stat. Explain that to me and I might see the other side.

 

I suppose that if you log your own cache you might be willing to power log. Not really sure if the two are that connected.

How about my wife and kids hid a cache for my birthday and I went and found it? I had no info other than what was posted on the cache page. We have a "team" account so I posted a found it log on a cache hidden by "me".

 

I certainly am not a cacher who is all about the numbers.

 

I thought you were tying power cachers with logging your own cache.

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I have been wondering lately why folks here are so worried about a cacher "cheating" by logging a cache they own as a find yet defending 1,000 or so finds on a power trail as legitimate finds and an acceptible way to cache. I know, the finders did not place the caches in the power trails. But they found essentially the same hide over and over and over again. It seems that in some cases they took the cache they found and left another. How in the world does a finder know what they did or did not find when things like this are going on? There can be any number of reasons for a cache owner to log their own hide as a find. There really can be only one reason for cachers to log 1,000 or so caches on a power trail. Numbers padding. It may be an excellent adventure but the only real reason to do it is to add many, many finds in a short period of time. Numbers padding. If it isn't about numbers padding the cachers would be mapping out 24 hour caching routes to find as many caches as they can in their local areas, which is still numbers chasing, but not numbers padding.

 

I doubt you'll find many, if any cacher, that is against logging your own cache, that is also pro power trail.

 

What does logging your own cache do for you, besides increase your stat. Explain that to me and I might see the other side.

 

I suppose that if you log your own cache you might be willing to power log. Not really sure if the two are that connected.

How about my wife and kids hid a cache for my birthday and I went and found it? I had no info other than what was posted on the cache page. We have a "team" account so I posted a found it log on a cache hidden by "me".

 

I certainly am not a cacher who is all about the numbers.

 

I thought you were tying power cachers with logging your own cache.

Just trying to point out how silly it is for cachers to get so worked up over these things. I think it is far more ludicrous for cachers to post 1,000 or more finds for the "same" cache than to post a find or two on a cache hidden by someone they know.

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I have been wondering lately why folks here are so worried about a cacher "cheating" by logging a cache they own as a find yet defending 1,000 or so finds on a power trail as legitimate finds and an acceptible way to cache.

 

LOL! Good point!! I guess the message is, "if you are going to cheat, cheat big!", a message reinforced recently by Bernie Madoff and others of his ilk.

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I have been wondering lately why folks here are so worried about a cacher "cheating" by logging a cache they own as a find yet defending 1,000 or so finds on a power trail as legitimate finds and an acceptible way to cache. I know, the finders did not place the caches in the power trails. But they found essentially the same hide over and over and over again. It seems that in some cases they took the cache they found and left another. How in the world does a finder know what they did or did not find when things like this are going on? There can be any number of reasons for a cache owner to log their own hide as a find. There really can be only one reason for cachers to log 1,000 or so caches on a power trail. Numbers padding. It may be an excellent adventure but the only real reason to do it is to add many, many finds in a short period of time. Numbers padding. If it isn't about numbers padding the cachers would be mapping out 24 hour caching routes to find as many caches as they can in their local areas, which is still numbers chasing, but not numbers padding.

 

I doubt you'll find many, if any cacher, that is against logging your own cache, that is also pro power trail.

 

What does logging your own cache do for you, besides increase your stat. Explain that to me and I might see the other side.

 

I suppose that if you log your own cache you might be willing to power log. Not really sure if the two are that connected.

How about my wife and kids hid a cache for my birthday and I went and found it? I had no info other than what was posted on the cache page. We have a "team" account so I posted a found it log on a cache hidden by "me".

 

I certainly am not a cacher who is all about the numbers.

 

I thought you were tying power cachers with logging your own cache.

Just trying to point out how silly it is for cachers to get so worked up over these things. I think it is far more ludicrous for cachers to post 1,000 or more finds for the "same" cache than to post a find or two on a cache hidden by someone they know.

 

I think one is ludicrous and the other is wrong. But that's just me.

 

My only expectation is that I might 'tap' people towards being 1=1.

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I have been wondering lately why folks here are so worried about a cacher "cheating" by logging a cache they own as a find yet defending 1,000 or so finds on a power trail as legitimate finds and an acceptible way to cache. I know, the finders did not place the caches in the power trails. But they found essentially the same hide over and over and over again. It seems that in some cases they took the cache they found and left another. How in the world does a finder know what they did or did not find when things like this are going on? There can be any number of reasons for a cache owner to log their own hide as a find. There really can be only one reason for cachers to log 1,000 or so caches on a power trail. Numbers padding. It may be an excellent adventure but the only real reason to do it is to add many, many finds in a short period of time. Numbers padding. If it isn't about numbers padding the cachers would be mapping out 24 hour caching routes to find as many caches as they can in their local areas, which is still numbers chasing, but not numbers padding.

 

I doubt you'll find many, if any cacher, that is against logging your own cache, that is also pro power trail.

 

What does logging your own cache do for you, besides increase your stat. Explain that to me and I might see the other side.

 

I suppose that if you log your own cache you might be willing to power log. Not really sure if the two are that connected.

How about my wife and kids hid a cache for my birthday and I went and found it? I had no info other than what was posted on the cache page. We have a "team" account so I posted a found it log on a cache hidden by "me".

 

I certainly am not a cacher who is all about the numbers.

 

I thought you were tying power cachers with logging your own cache.

Just trying to point out how silly it is for cachers to get so worked up over these things. I think it is far more ludicrous for cachers to post 1,000 or more finds for the "same" cache than to post a find or two on a cache hidden by someone they know.

 

I think one is ludicrous and the other is wrong. But that's just me.

 

My only expectation is that I might 'tap' people towards being 1=1.

I am happy to admit that I don't care if someone posts a found it log on their own cache.

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I just don't think logging your own cache as a find is the travesty some people make it out to be. It's one thing to say it's lame and cheesy - it is kind of lame and cheesy - but the posturing and hyperbole about cheating and numbers is a bit much.

 

So you wouldn't care if gc.com removed the the stat count for logging your own cache.

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I have been wondering lately why folks here are so worried about a cacher "cheating" by logging a cache they own as a find yet defending 1,000 or so finds on a power trail as legitimate finds and an acceptible way to cache. I know, the finders did not place the caches in the power trails. But they found essentially the same hide over and over and over again. It seems that in some cases they took the cache they found and left another. How in the world does a finder know what they did or did not find when things like this are going on? There can be any number of reasons for a cache owner to log their own hide as a find. There really can be only one reason for cachers to log 1,000 or so caches on a power trail. Numbers padding. It may be an excellent adventure but the only real reason to do it is to add many, many finds in a short period of time. Numbers padding. If it isn't about numbers padding the cachers would be mapping out 24 hour caching routes to find as many caches as they can in their local areas, which is still numbers chasing, but not numbers padding.

 

I doubt you'll find many, if any cacher, that is against logging your own cache, that is also pro power trail.

 

What does logging your own cache do for you, besides increase your stat. Explain that to me and I might see the other side.

 

I suppose that if you log your own cache you might be willing to power log. Not really sure if the two are that connected.

How about my wife and kids hid a cache for my birthday and I went and found it? I had no info other than what was posted on the cache page. We have a "team" account so I posted a found it log on a cache hidden by "me".

 

I certainly am not a cacher who is all about the numbers.

 

I thought you were tying power cachers with logging your own cache.

And the above scenario did happen but I chose not to log the cache as a find. If it happened today I think I would log the find under the same circumstances. :)

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I just don't think logging your own cache as a find is the travesty some people make it out to be. It's one thing to say it's lame and cheesy - it is kind of lame and cheesy - but the posturing and hyperbole about cheating and numbers is a bit much.

 

So you wouldn't care if gc.com removed the the stat count for logging your own cache.

 

No, I wouldn't care. I would be surprised if Groundspeak got involved in the stats game to that degree, though.

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I just don't think logging your own cache as a find is the travesty some people make it out to be. It's one thing to say it's lame and cheesy - it is kind of lame and cheesy - but the posturing and hyperbole about cheating and numbers is a bit much.

 

So you wouldn't care if gc.com removed the the stat count for logging your own cache.

I certainly wouldn't care. You can verify my claim by reading the logs of my so called milestone caches. I list them on my profile. I like the numbers but I don't care what cache IS the number. :)

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Okay. If gc.com does consider the option we can debate that then.

 

They recently shot the option down in the feedback forum.

 

Ah, it likely needed more angst to get it changed. :anibad:

 

I don't know about angst... I just get the sense that Groundspeak wants to avoid being the arbiters of imaginary competitions between cachers. Same reason they don't go anywhere near FTF angst.

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I think I agree with the majority where logging your own cache does not constitute a find. A definition of find is "to locate, attain, or obtain by search or effort" or "to discover". By "finding" your own cache, you did not locate, attain or put any effort into doing so or even discovering it. You've failed to fulfill the definition of a find if you do log a find on your cache.

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I think I agree with the majority where logging your own cache does not constitute a find. A definition of find is "to locate, attain, or obtain by search or effort" or "to discover". By "finding" your own cache, you did not locate, attain or put any effort into doing so or even discovering it. You've failed to fulfill the definition of a find if you do log a find on your cache.

 

Don't make me post the Citizen Kane gif again.

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Okay. If gc.com does consider the option we can debate that then.

 

They recently shot the option down in the feedback forum.

 

Ah, it likely needed more angst to get it changed. :anibad:

 

I don't know about angst... I just get the sense that Groundspeak wants to avoid being the arbiters of imaginary competitions between cachers. Same reason they don't go anywhere near FTF angst.

 

I was joking, but _Wolverine's comment cover the basic definition. I'm not really sure why we need to defend owner logging by stating that it doesn't hurt anything.

 

Why defend it at all if it doesn't matter.

 

Apparently there's an issue with saying it's wrong, and not just because it's taking away something.

Edited by BlueDeuce
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Okay. If gc.com does consider the option we can debate that then.

 

They recently shot the option down in the feedback forum.

 

Ah, it likely needed more angst to get it changed. :anibad:

 

I don't know about angst... I just get the sense that Groundspeak wants to avoid being the arbiters of imaginary competitions between cachers. Same reason they don't go anywhere near FTF angst.

 

I was joking, but _Wolverine's comment cover the basic definition. I'm not really sure why we need to defend owner logging by stating that it doesn't hurt anything.

 

Why defend it at all if it doesn't matter.

 

Apparently there's an issue with saying it's wrong, and not just because it's taking away something.

Why attack it at all if it doesn't matter? Why is it wrong if it doesn't matter? To me it is just another thing we really do not need to be worrying about when it comes to discussing important topics regarding geocaching and the future of the game.

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I think I agree with the majority where logging your own cache does not constitute a find. A definition of find is "to locate, attain, or obtain by search or effort" or "to discover". By "finding" your own cache, you did not locate, attain or put any effort into doing so or even discovering it. You've failed to fulfill the definition of a find if you do log a find on your cache.
What about situations where you actually do "locate, attain, or obtain by search or effort" and "discover" a cache that happens to be owned by your geocaching.com account?

 

Some people adopt caches that they haven't found yet. On their first visit to the cache location, they have to find the cache just like anyone else.

 

Sometimes multiple people share a single account. If one person hides the cache, then the other can still find the cache just like anyone else.

 

Sometimes caches migrate, and the cache owners don't know where they've migrated to. In such situations, the owner will need to find the cache just like anyone else.

 

And so on. I might not log a find for my own caches (at least, not intentionally), but if cache owners think find logs are the most accurate way to record experiences like those above, I won't try to stop them.

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Why attack it at all if it doesn't matter? Why is it wrong if it doesn't matter? To me it is just another thing we really do not need to be worrying about when it comes to discussing important topics regarding geocaching and the future of the game.

 

It matters to me which is why I go against the "what does it matter?" crowd. Are you following me here?

 

Don't tell me not to worry if you aren't going to back it up.

Edited by BlueDeuce
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Why attack it at all if it doesn't matter? Why is it wrong if it doesn't matter? To me it is just another thing we really do not need to be worrying about when it comes to discussing important topics regarding geocaching and the future of the game.

 

It matters to me which is why I go against the "what does it matter? crowd" Are you following me here?

 

Don't tell me not to worry if you aren't going to back it up.

Back it up how? By not logging the find on the cache my family placed using our account? Oops, didn't log it. What more would you suggest I do? I am not the logging police. To me it doesn't matter how others choose to log. I play the game the way I see fit and judge only myself. Most of the time. ;)

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On a sort of related note... I was planning a trip recently, and looking at some caches on an area of the map near my destination that seemed especially interesting. There was one cache I looked at, with a fairly high terrain rating, and a lot of really interesting logs. The cache had been in place for a long time, since 2003 I think.

 

Within the past month, the cache had been adopted by a new owner. The first log after the adoption was a "Found" log, from the previous owner! It even said something like "I 'found' this one a long time ago." (Yes, with the scare quotes around found.)

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On a sort of related note... I was planning a trip recently, and looking at some caches on an area of the map near my destination that seemed especially interesting. There was one cache I looked at, with a fairly high terrain rating, and a lot of really interesting logs. The cache had been in place for a long time, since 2003 I think.

 

Within the past month, the cache had been adopted by a new owner. The first log after the adoption was a "Found" log, from the previous owner! It even said something like "I 'found' this one a long time ago." (Yes, with the scare quotes around found.)

 

Does that bother me? Not one bit. Do I think it's absurd? Absolutely.

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I also think its bad form.

It happens in my area, I once told the person that he shouldnt sign his own caches and the answer I got is that its their cache and he can... I left it at that...

 

Anyway, something that people forget is that numbers bring statut.

How many of you will give the same respect to a cacher with 100 finds compared to someone with 10000 finds?

 

So in a way the game is about the numbers. Numbers gets you respect and allow you to climb the geocaching community ladder. :)

 

BTW - I got my 100th find today. :lol:

 

Personally, I think 'finding' your own caches is cheesy. I have 3 caches hidden and it never even occurred to me that I should 'find' what I hid. In the end though, I won't be heartbroken if others find their own hides. The only person they're cheating (really) is themselves. I personally won't do it because it feels wrong.

 

I "get" the 10000 respect factor. However, I also doubt that in practice people hide a significant number of caches as compared against their finds. I could be wrong since I'm still new'ish to this sport. I would imagine that an extreme case of people logging their own finds would realistically only cause a 10% bump in their number.

 

My 2 cents...

Edited by Redfist
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I've DNFed my own cache before, only because someone rehid it in a totally different spot, but never logged my own. Most tempted to do so on challenge caches, but even then, I wont.

A challenge cache is an interesting question! I think if you have not compleated the challange before posting, and you visited the cache again after completeing the challange it would be OK.

 

We have a "Lonely Cache" challange here. The only caches that counted were ones found after the challange cache was listed. I think something like that would be perfectly OK for the CO to log.

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Wow I can't believe there is even a debate about this. Yes I've been logging my caches and events as found, not because I want to show I have 8 more finds, but because sometimes you just have to have fun. If I'm out with friends who are looking for my cache, I'll write a found log describing my time at that cache. I use it more as an earmark so I can look back on the day we were there. If me having an extra 8 finds is going to make the world spin backwards then by all means I will remove them, but I think Geocaching is fun, a great way to get out in the woods, and best of all, spend time with friends. I could give two cents for how many finds someone else has, nor do I honestly care how many I have. Now I've used different caches as milestones, such as events and friends caches, more to commemorate the day, or lift a friends cache a little higher. Seriously when you come right down to it the amount of caches a person has doesn't matter one bit to me. I can't tell you how many times I've been asked "How many caches do you have?" and I don't have an answer. I'll usually give something like around this, or not yet 1000, or my favorite, "Not a clue." I just don't care. When I talk to cachers I'm way more interested in listening to people talk about the adventures they've had over how many caches they've accrued. I don't care about how many finds you have. In the end it's all about having fun, and until someone starts giving out trophies or better yet money for how many caches you find, then I'm going to continue to log my caches as found. Not to increase my cache count, but to make a log about how much fun I've had watching someone try to find my cache.

 

Yep I'm a bad person who needs tared and feathered, but I'm sure having fun doing it. ;)

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... Yes I've been logging my caches and events as found, not because I want to show I have 8 more finds, but because sometimes you just have to have fun. If I'm out with friends who are looking for my cache, I'll write a found log describing my time at that cache....

 

I understand that. Use the "note" log instead of the "found" log type for such memories. See: http://support.Groundspeak.com/index.php?pg=kb.page&id=80

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... Yes I've been logging my caches and events as found, not because I want to show I have 8 more finds, but because sometimes you just have to have fun. If I'm out with friends who are looking for my cache, I'll write a found log describing my time at that cache....

 

I understand that. Use the "note" log instead of the "found" log type for such memories. See: http://support.Groundspeak.com/index.php?pg=kb.page&id=80

That may not work for him for the simple reason that his friends cannot pop over to his profile and pull up a list of the 'notes' that he has written. They can easily pull up his 'find' logs, however.
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If I'm out with friends who are looking for my cache, I'll write a found log describing my time at that cache. I use it more as an earmark so I can look back on the day we were there.

 

I go out with friends who are hunting my own caches fairly often, but I log notes. It accomplishes the same thing.

 

In the end it's all about having fun, and until someone starts giving out trophies or better yet money for how many caches you find, then I'm going to continue to log my caches as found.

 

But they do. I've seen geocoins awarded for reaching certain numbers of finds, golden ammo cans presented, events held in honor of the person's achievement, congratulatory threads in the forums, and many local geocaching organization's websites have a section feting cachers who reach a certain number of finds.

Edited by briansnat
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... Yes I've been logging my caches and events as found, not because I want to show I have 8 more finds, but because sometimes you just have to have fun. If I'm out with friends who are looking for my cache, I'll write a found log describing my time at that cache....

 

I understand that. Use the "note" log instead of the "found" log type for such memories. See: http://support.Groundspeak.com/index.php?pg=kb.page&id=80

That may not work for him for the simple reason that his friends cannot pop over to his profile and pull up a list of the 'notes' that he has written. They can easily pull up his 'find' logs, however.

ummmm - the friends were with him and know what cache it was at - easy to look at notes.

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I've seen geocoins awarded for reaching certain numbers of finds, golden ammo cans presented, events held in honor of the person's achievement, congratulatory threads in the forums, and many local geocaching organization's websites have a section feting cachers who reach a certain number of finds.

 

And it's up to people/groups who give these awards to set their own standards in this regard.

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But they do. I've seen geocoins awarded for reaching certain numbers of finds, golden ammo cans presented, events held in honor of the person's achievement, congratulatory threads in the forums, and many local geocaching organization's websites have a section feting cachers who reach a certain number of finds.

 

True, but since I'm the one who started our local group and I don't much give a darn about how many I find, the last thing I'm going to do is buy myself one of those coins, and for sure no one in our group will ever get one for me. They all know that I like coins that will remind me of a person, day, cache, event, or group.

 

If you look at the TBs and Coins I own you'll see what is important to me.

 

That may not work for him for the simple reason that his friends cannot pop over to his profile and pull up a list of the 'notes' that he has written. They can easily pull up his 'find' logs, however.

 

Exactly! I use notes to write notes, I write logs for memories. Take a few minutes and look at a few of them. I enjoy writing logs as much as caching.

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I have logged just one of my own caches. That cache (17 GC1NBVB) is a challenge cache that requires that 17%, or higher, of a cachers finds be puzzle/mystery caches. What makes this challenge cache kind of unique is that, unlike most challenge caches, it favors those cachers with fewer finds. Since I placed the cache 2 years ago I have stayed above that 17% mark and with over 5800 finds as of today that isn't trivial. The physical cache could probably be found without a GPS if you use GoogleEarth and if there wasn't snow on the ground it would probably be wheelchair accessible so it's all about the challenge. Adding 1 to my find count really doesn't affect my numbers that much.

 

I'm sure that my logging just one of my own caches will not upset the master plan of the universe, if there is one, but it will still cause a gnashing of teeth for some cachers that consider themselves 'purists'. All I can say is don't loose too much sleep over it, I won't. :)

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I have logged just one of my own caches. That cache (17 GC1NBVB) is a challenge cache that requires that 17%, or higher, of a cachers finds be puzzle/mystery caches. What makes this challenge cache kind of unique is that, unlike most challenge caches, it favors those cachers with fewer finds. Since I placed the cache 2 years ago I have stayed above that 17% mark and with over 5800 finds as of today that isn't trivial. The physical cache could probably be found without a GPS if you use GoogleEarth and if there wasn't snow on the ground it would probably be wheelchair accessible so it's all about the challenge. Adding 1 to my find count really doesn't affect my numbers that much.

 

I'm sure that my logging just one of my own caches will not upset the master plan of the universe, if there is one, but it will still cause a gnashing of teeth for some cachers that consider themselves 'purists'. All I can say is don't loose too much sleep over it, I won't. :)

I think it's fabulous ! Congratulations on keeping up with your challenge figure for more than two years - that takes some doing ! Well worth logging the smiley for not just meeting the challenge but exceeding it so far.

Edited by hotshoe
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Just found a Tenth Anniversary Coin, I can't believe that this guy put in the wild.

 

It's going to my Meet N' great event. The event has a TB table, the coin will not be placed there.

 

I hate finding Geocoins in caches, I feel like it's the kiss of death. Around here a Geocoin's life expectancy is about three seconds. If I find one I will adventure dip it until I can personally hand it to someone else. At least that way I feel it has a little bit of a chance. If I see one in a cache I feel like it's my obligation to keep it safe until I can make sure it goes to a person instead of just leaving it somewhere so someone can add it to their private collection.

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LOL! Good point!! I guess the message is, "if you are going to cheat, cheat big!", a message reinforced recently by Bernie Madoff and others of his ilk.

 

So who is the grand champion of logging their own caches? Post your numbers here.

 

Edscott [1] logged prior to adoption.

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LOL! Good point!! I guess the message is, "if you are going to cheat, cheat big!", a message reinforced recently by Bernie Madoff and others of his ilk.

 

So who is the grand champion of logging their own caches? Post your numbers here.

 

Edscott [1] logged prior to adoption.

 

10, all were found before I adopted them.

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The only reason I can see for this is something I noticed on the weekend. My phone does not differentiate between unfound caches and my own caches. It shows my caches as ones I haven't found in the area.

 

Although this doesn't ever mean i'll log my own as a find, but that's the only logical reason I can see for doing so.

 

This is the case on the iPhone. It's a little frustrating. I wish it labeled your own as stars like on the website.

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