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Include elevation on cache site page?


4x4van
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Whenever I get ready to go do some geocaching, I always make sure to use the "Topozone" link on the cache site page to get an elevation. But what about the idea of including the elevation of the site right on the page, below or near the coodinates? Just a thought icon_wink.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by 4x4van:

Whenever I get ready to go do some geocaching, I always make sure to use the "Topozone" link on the cache site page to get an elevation. But what about the idea of including the elevation of the site right on the page, below or near the coodinates? Just a thought icon_wink.gif


Most GPSs (consumer grade) are horribly inaccurate when it comes to altitude, unless they've got a built-in barometric altimeter (and it's properly calibrated). Unless both the cache placer and hunter have barometric altimeters, it's pretty pointless.

 

Besides, I really don't see the point, unless the cache is hidden in a high-rise building. Once you get to the cache spot, are there really any substantial elevation choices to be made? (beyond the usual "is it in a tree/on the ground" type choices)

 

3608_2800.gif

"Don't mess with a geocacher. We know all the best places to hide a body."

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quote:
Originally posted by Prime Suspect:

quote:
Originally posted by 4x4van:

Whenever I get ready to go do some geocaching, I always make sure to use the "Topozone" link on the cache site page to get an elevation. But what about the idea of including the elevation of the site right on the page, below or near the coodinates? Just a thought icon_wink.gif


Most GPSs (consumer grade) are horribly inaccurate when it comes to altitude, unless they've got a built-in barometric altimeter (and it's properly calibrated). Unless both the cache placer and hunter have barometric altimeters, it's pretty pointless.

 

Besides, I really don't see the point, unless the cache is hidden in a high-rise building. Once you get to the cache spot, are there really any _substantial_ elevation choices to be made? (beyond the usual "is it in a tree/on the ground" type choices)

 

http://img.Groundspeak.com/user/3608_2800.gif

_"Don't mess with a geocacher. We know all the best places to hide a body."_


 

Well if you included elevation, then when you get to 250 feet, and you're at 800 feet and the cache is marked 1150 feet, then you know you have a very tough Choice in front of you.

 

If you don't have elevation, and you're at 250 feet, you can say I hope it's NOT up there...but your compass is telling you that IT"S UP THERE...

 

oh Heck...you're right...it's pointless.

 

Give me a Tall ship, and a Star to steer her bye...

 

The White Fleet....

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quote:
Most GPSs (consumer grade) are horribly inaccurate when it comes to altitude, unless they've got a built-in barometric altimeter (and it's properly calibrated). Unless both the cache placer and hunter have barometric altimeters, it's pretty pointless.

 

Besides, I really don't see the point, unless the cache is hidden in a high-rise building. Once you get to the cache spot, are there really any substantial elevation choices to be made? (beyond the usual "is it in a tree/on the ground" type choices)


 

Spoken like a flatlander icon_smile.gif Just kidding of course. It would be nice to have elevation data available for caches placed in mountainous terrain. Not everyone has a topo map loaded in their gps. Knowing how the elevation of your destination compares to your present elevation is a useful thing to know when hiking in mountains.

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There's no reason the cache owner can't include this information in the cache description.

 

Every day or two, someone asked for something to be added to the cache entry page. On very rare occasions, it's something that actually makes sense. But usually, it either something that would only apply to a tiny fraction of caches (as here), or something that's just ridiculous.

 

3608_2800.gif

"Don't mess with a geocacher. We know all the best places to hide a body."

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In the hills in the LA area, altitude can be helpful. I realize that it is not extremely accurate, but even with a +/- 50' it can help in choosing a path to take. But, because it is not applicable to most caches, the cache owner should just note the altitude in tbe description -- if they cache think that it would be helpful.

 

Not until we are lost do we begin to understand ourselves.

Henry David Thoreau

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quote:
Originally posted by Prime Suspect:

 

Besides, I really don't see the point, unless the cache is hidden in a high-rise building. Once you get to the cache spot, are there really any _substantial_ elevation choices to be made? (beyond the usual "is it in a tree/on the ground" type choices)


 

People have been known to hide caches at the top of a sheer cliff, or at the bottom, or somewhere in between. In such cases, an approximate elevation on the page, perhaps in the encrypted clues, might be considered.

 

Great idea for a three part multicache, same coordinates for each stage. icon_wink.gif

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quote:
Originally posted by BassoonPilot:

Great idea for a three part multicache, same coordinates for each stage. icon_wink.gif


I've done a 2-part multicache based on that idea. The coordinates were'nt exactly the same, though, but close enough to cause confusion.icon_smile.gif

 

Couple of other caches at sheer cliffs I've done (and couple I've made tooicon_wink.gif) didn't have a reference of their elevation. Part of the challenge was to figure the spot and it's elevation yourself.

 

- I just got lost in thought. It was unfamiliar territory. -

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I just did a parking lot cache, and it gave the altitude as 900-something feet. I just figured it was at the top of the parking structure, took the elevator up, and saw it as soon as I got off the elevator. My son's Tellow Etrek showed the elevation to be about 5 ft. Then we went off to do another cahce by the same person - this time at a nearby mall, and he listed the altitude as 1000+ feet. Again, we just went to the top level and found the cache. This time the GPS showed us at below sea level.

 

So, yes, the GPS really doesnt handle altitude in any useful way.

 

Laura

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There's no reason the cache owner can't include this information in the cache description. <BR><BR>Every day or two, someone asked for something to be added to the cache entry page. On very rare occasions, it's something that actually makes sense. But usually, it either something that would only apply to a tiny fraction of caches (as here), or something that's just <A HREF="http://ubbx.Groundspeak.com/6/ubb.x?a=tpc&s=5726007311&f=8016058331&m=28060257" TARGET=_blank>ridiculous</A>.<BR><BR><IMG SRC="http://img.Groundspeak.com/user/3608_2800.gif"> <BR>"Don't mess with a geocacher. We know all the best places to hide a body."

 

But, if it were included as a field on the cache submission page, then it could download as part of the .gpx and actually show the altitude of the cache on the GPS. I agree, when you are hiking (or considering hiking) up a hill/mountain, it'd be nice to know in advance how much elevation change there will be from your start point.

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it'd be nice to know in advance how much elevation change there will be from your start point.

That's what topo maps are for :rolleyes:

 

When topo maps and/or topo software becomes free, then that would work. By that theory, you shouldn't need a GPS either. Topo maps have lat-long marked on them and you can find any coord from the map.

 

Glad to see this change is in the works. Might as well use ALL the info the GPS gives you :anicute:

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