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Why Geocaching?


erichmich62
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I am sure that I will make more than a few angry, but what is the point of geocaching? Use of an electronic device to direct one to an object seems pointless. The use of a GPS to do this takes away from knowledge of maps, map symbols, use of features to route, compass use, etc. Sure, you can argue that you still need to select a path to get to your object, but what is the skill outside of that? If you want to argue that it gets you out of the house and moving around for the purpose of a treasure hunt, then fine, but I can't envision an explaination greater than that. I kind of lump this in with the same type who uses a GPS to take the same route to work every day that only involves one or two turns. Somebody enlighten me.

 

Erich in MI

 

P.S. I do have a GPS, and have had one for 15 years. I recently bought a new one for purposes of exploring.

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If you want to argue that it gets you out of the house and moving around for the purpose of a treasure hunt, then fine, but I can't envision an explaination greater than that.

I think that is why most of us stick with Geocaching. We certainly use it to discover new places around us and to make long distance trips much more interesting.

I'm sorry that this doesn't seem to be an activity that you enjoy. Maybe try some more caches (no I didn't peak and am not making a judgement, just noting that sometimes it takes a bit to find exactly what you like in an activity).

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What's the point of hiking? You just walk somewhere.

 

What's the point of golf? You just hit a little ball.

 

What's the point of going to a movie? You just sit there.

 

Geocaching is a fun activity where I get to spend time outdoors, get some exercise, and yes, get to play with technology. I like finding new places, parks, historic markers, views, etc. that I may not have known existed.

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for purposes of exploring.

That's the main reason I enjoy Geocaching. There's sometimes an interesting hunt for a cleverly concealed container, and I find places I'd otherwise never have known about. And if you'd like to hone map-reading skills, there are tons of caches which include orienteering challenges.

Edited by kunarion
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P.S. I do have a GPS, and have had one for 15 years. I recently bought a new one for purposes of exploring.

 

Yesterday, a friend and I hiked all day, with about a two thousand feet climb, into some of the back country where I had never been, along ice covered routes where deer trails were the best that could be found. There were caches placed near caves and stunning rock formations that I never would have discovered otherwise. I can't count how many times caching has brought to me places that are new and unusual. For me, that is a major part of the "why."

 

It has given me a focus for hikes and trips with family, friends, or dog. My daughter and I followed a series of caches, each one telling part of a story, to the top of a ridge, that I might never have gotten her to try otherwise.. Through earthcaching, it has taught me more about geology and to look closer at what I am seeing. It has allowed me to meet good people who have become better friends.

 

To me, finding a container is probably the least interesting aspect of the game. But some people like the search, or solving puzzles to get them to the cache. It is a game large enough to encompass many different styles and interests.

 

Every so often, my wife tells me that the game is a little silly. I have to agree. But sometimes that is exactly what I need (and its cheaper than golf).

 

The point of caching is to do it. In the end, if you have to ask "why," the game might not be for you.

Edited by mulvaney
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Understood. Didn't mean to ruffle any feathers with my arrogant approach. I am more dismayed with the lessor use of map and compass, and the dieing skill among the masses. Both my older kids have a GPS for their cars and neither have seemed to have grasped any mapreading skills I've tried to teach them. They now solely use their GPS to find places.

 

The travel and seeing places new is a desirable outcome of geocatching. I can envision the appeal.

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Understood. Didn't mean to ruffle any feathers with my arrogant approach. I am more dismayed with the lessor use of map and compass, and the dieing skill among the masses. Both my older kids have a GPS for their cars and neither have seemed to have grasped any mapreading skills I've tried to teach them. They now solely use their GPS to find places.

 

The travel and seeing places new is a desirable outcome of geocatching. I can envision the appeal.

There is a subgroup of people who cache using map and compass, I admire them as I did decently at LandNav but I'm not sure I could find a camo'd pill bottle in the woods.

Take your kids caching, don't lament that they don't already have the skills.

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I agree we are listening more to our gps units cell phone jingles, and computer 1's and 0's these days, and it can be disgusting when you stop to think about it, and how it affects people when their units break, and they realise they have no real world skills without such devices, but the sad truth is, there is generally someone around them who has another one that can get the job done in an emergency.

 

Those people who blindly go out into the wild without a basic foundation in first aide, and navigation without a gps, are aksing for trouble, but how often does that happen? Most people play this game within the comforts of a Mc Donalds or CVS, the ones who DO get out in the woods to go hiking, would have probably done it before geocaching, and would know how to conduct themselves in an emergency. (i.e. are generally prepared)

 

Your kids may not know how to read a map because they merely watch their gps tell them how to get from point a to point b, and your kids may not know how to survive in a warzone outside of their computer,

 

then again, maybe they know more than you think.

 

no point was made here, just rambling.

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Understood. Didn't mean to ruffle any feathers with my arrogant approach. I am more dismayed with the lessor use of map and compass, and the dieing skill among the masses. Both my older kids have a GPS for their cars and neither have seemed to have grasped any mapreading skills I've tried to teach them. They now solely use their GPS to find places.

 

The travel and seeing places new is a desirable outcome of geocatching. I can envision the appeal.

 

I sometimes raise my eyebrows when our daughters want to use the car with the gpsr because they can't find their way around an area where they have lived most of their lives. There is the classic story of the people who drove into a lake because that is where the gps unit pointed. Some life skills are needed, and I hope that in some way caching contributes to those skills because it can teach you to be aware of where you are, what you are seeing, the environment you find yourself in, and (even if an arrow is pointing in the right direction), how are you going to get there.

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I've loved exploring since I was a kid. Geocaching is a perfect fit for that. I've discovered hundreds of cool places that I might never have found but for geocaching. Hidden waterfalls, fascinating historic sites, scenic overlooks, mines and caves, offbeat places, ruins, cool rock formations, peaceful spots in the woods, great new hiking trails and more.

 

I was brought to many of these places because there was a geocache there. Others I discovered while looking for interesting places to hide my own caches.

 

Geocaching gives me a good excuse to leave the beaten path and explore. Sometimes its the extra nudge I need to forget about household chores and get outdoors.

 

Geocaching has also enabled me to meet countless like-minded people and enjoy hikes and other outings with new friends that I meet through the sport.

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I recently bought a new one for purposes of exploring.

 

As others have said, geocaching can give you destinations to explore and will almost certainly introduce you to places that you wouldn't have found on your own.

 

All kinds of people geocache. Many geocachers wont leave paved areas to cache and will just follow the arrow to the cache. For serious exploring, the use of maps of some kind is essential :- following the arrow up and over a mountain instead of following a trail around the mountain teaches you that lesson pretty quickly. Most people that I know who really get to known their surroundings use topo maps (either paper maps or maps on their GPSr or both). I dont own or use a regular compass though on the forums it's often recommended that people carry a compass.

 

One of Mulvaney's posts above gives a pretty good list of other reasons for geocaching. It's certainly not just about getting from point A to point B.

Edited by sdarken
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P.S. I do have a GPS, and have had one for 15 years. I recently bought a new one for purposes of exploring.

 

What's the point of exploring, one might ask? Hasn't everything already been discovered and mapped, pretty much? Why explore someplace that somebody's already been? :rolleyes:

 

Everyone does their thing for their own reasons. Don't think of it as navigating to an object, think of it as navigating to a location. The object (cache container with a log book inside) is merely the means to document that you've been there. Sure, some locations are going to be kinda lame (in parking lots and such), but many well thought-out caches will take you to places that are interesting in some way...either for the history, or the scenery, or the hike or bike ride or climb it took to get there. Geocaching has given me a reason to visit many cool locations (most very close to home) that I either didn't know were there, or had never stopped to appreciate before. I think that's the real reason, at least for me.

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Understood. Didn't mean to ruffle any feathers with my arrogant approach.

Sure you did. You even said so in your very first sentence. This thread is nothing but a wanabe elitist attempting to troll.

 

I took it as an honest question with an opportunity to give an honest answer.

 

(Side note, my wife has lived no less then 2 miles away from the house she was born in and couldn't tell you the names of the roads to get there. On the other hand her directions to her grandfather's second farm are 'Head to the North place and it's the East of the North end." I need a Plat map just to find a field with her directions)

 

Geocaching takes me places, but so does letterboxing, kayaking, bird watching, biking, orienteering, and a bunch of other activities.

 

Geocaching is an act of searching for an item hidden for me to find. I could do all those other activities but it's the act of geocaching that I enjoy most. Other people like to do other things as part of their venturing and that's okay by me. Geocaching is just the thing I prefer to do. Not everybody agrees with the hobby, but that doesn't mean that geocaching doesn't have a point or purpose. It's just one more reason to get out there and enjoy the day.

 

If I get the chance to enjoy a trail in a nice park and geocache, I call it a good time.

Edited by BlueDeuce
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I kind of lump this in with the same type who uses a GPS to take the same route to work every day that only involves one or two turns. Somebody enlighten me.

 

Most of your average park visitors stick to the main trails and rarely venture beyond. Geocaching can take you into the depths and challenge not only your stamina but your mind as well.

 

Try this one on for size sometime: The Journal

 

Authors note: Do not attempt to solve this unless you are very prepared and in good physical condition. I recommend you take the necessary supplies for a daylong adventure. This should include paper, pencil, water, a lunch and patience. You should also record your starting coordinates before starting your search. I do not want to see anyone stuck in the woods overnight.
Edited by BlueDeuce
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I took it as an honest question with an opportunity to give an honest answer.

I found some of his points interesting. There has always been geocaching before GPS was invented. Wilderness or mountain caches or mountain peak caches you just had to learn about by word of mouth. Use your maps/compass, you get there, find the locker, sign a log. However his tone is too confrontational.

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Understood. Didn't mean to ruffle any feathers with my arrogant approach.

Sure you did. You even said so in your very first sentence. This thread is nothing but a wanabe elitist attempting to troll.

 

I took it as an honest question with an opportunity to give an honest answer.

I didn't, but still answered as if it were an honest question.

 

I really don't care if it's more challenging to use a compass and charts. As far as people losing such abilities, I wouldn't do any manual compass & map work like orienteering at all, if it weren't for Geocaching. Even with a GPSr, it's often plenty challenging just getting to GZ, and then finding a cleverly hidden container. I have never left a cache wishing it had been harder.

 

But people do use maps to find Geocaches. Lots of people starting out don't have a GPS. You may use whatever system you feel most comfortable using.

Edited by kunarion
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I am sure that I will make more than a few angry, but what is the point of geocaching? Use of an electronic device to direct one to an object seems pointless. The use of a GPS to do this takes away from knowledge of maps, map symbols, use of features to route, compass use, etc. Sure, you can argue that you still need to select a path to get to your object, but what is the skill outside of that? If you want to argue that it gets you out of the house and moving around for the purpose of a treasure hunt, then fine, but I can't envision an explaination greater than that. I kind of lump this in with the same type who uses a GPS to take the same route to work every day that only involves one or two turns. Somebody enlighten me.

 

Erich in MI

 

P.S. I do have a GPS, and have had one for 15 years. I recently bought a new one for purposes of exploring.

 

One might ask why you own a GPS. Rand and McNally makes a fine road map and many auto parts stores sell a compass you can suction cup to your dash. Seems like it would be pointless for you to own a GPS since you enjoy the use of maps and compass so much.

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As a kid I enjoyed exploring the woods near my house. Geocaching gives me a purpose to do that again. I can read a map. Sure I have to use the GPS at first but my sense of direction keeps improving and every time I drive a route I remember more details and can mostly navigate sans GPS in the areas I cache in the most. But the GPS is very helpful for the small roads.

 

It's also a great excuse to get outside and away from the computer. It's not for everyone, but it keeps me mentally and physically active instead of just sitting around playing video games.

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You're asking why we like it, and some people seem intent on convincing you that it is a fun thing to do.

 

The fact is it is not for everyone. Maybe it is not something you would like. I'm assuming you haven't tried it since you haven't found any, but you may just have not been successful at it, and that may be where you got the hard feelings about the sport.

 

Try it if you want. You may find your own reasons for liking it. Most things we have to try before we know whether we like it or not.

But you may not like it, and that's OK too. I may not enjoy many of the other activities you enjoy.

 

There are a lot of different sports and activities in this world because there are many different people.

 

There's nothing wrong with you not liking it, and there's nothing wrong with our liking it.

If you don't like it, find a game that better suits you.

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Understood. Didn't mean to ruffle any feathers with my arrogant approach. I am more dismayed with the lessor use of map and compass, and the dieing skill among the masses. Both my older kids have a GPS for their cars and neither have seemed to have grasped any mapreading skills I've tried to teach them. They now solely use their GPS to find places.

 

The travel and seeing places new is a desirable outcome of geocatching. I can envision the appeal.

 

A big part of the reason I geocache is because there is no point to it. I find it very refreshing to do something that is totally pointless. Certainly learning to read a map and compass were NOT a part of my reason for taking up caching.

 

As for the dying skills... I remember when they said that about calculators, and there was a time that they said that about horseshoeing, I'm sure. We still have people that can do complex math by hand, and you can find craftsmen that are skilled in shoeing a horse. The world did not end.

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As for the dying skills... I remember when they said that about calculators, and there was a time that they said that about horseshoeing, I'm sure. We still have people that can do complex math by hand, and you can find craftsmen that are skilled in shoeing a horse. The world did not end.

And in the automotive web sites, people are posting "Why Cars?"

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To respond to a couple of comments;

 

"wanabe elitist attempting to troll"

Far from it. I just want to be enlightened.

 

"why do you need a GPS to explore"

I've used a map and compass for years, long before GPS and even before Loran, but I have one for a number of reasons including: Convenience of navigation when I am hiking, paddling, pedaling or driving; interest in seeing where I went after the fact; and also because many times for the areas that I explore the maps are inaccurate or lacking detail.

 

From the comments in the assorted responses, I can now envision the appeal. I just go about my exploring a different way, and I enjoy reaching locations that hadn't been trampled on my dozens or hundreds of others. When I reach an area that I've navigated to I leave with a photograph or more often just with a pleasant memory of the efforts required to get to an interesting spot that few others had been to.

 

P.S. Beyond my old maps and compasses, I've hung onto my old slide rules, coaster brake ballon tire bikes and other old technology.

Edited by erichmich62
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Re: people who can't navigate anywhere without a GPS. Those people existed before you could by a GPS and exist today among people that don't own a GPS. I've known plenty of people who are TERRIBLE at navigating anywhere and get lost easily. Navigating and map-reading are skills you can learn, but some people just aren't naturally adept at it.

 

As for the OP's original question "why geocache?": it's directed wandering and takes me places I wouldn't otherwise have a reason to go. Plus I find many of the puzzles are interesting, the Earthcaches educational, and enjoy the "wow" factor of clever hides/containers. I would also Waymarking more if it had a better system i.e. more like Geocaching.com has.

 

I actually never used a GPS before geocaching. I'm a lifelong lover of maps. I can look at a road atlas or Google Maps, make a few notes on paper, absorb a bunch of information in my head, and get there with no problem.

 

P.S. Tip to the OP: a confrontational/arrogant attitude that will NOT endear you to the forum members here. Please play nice.

Edited by joshism
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To respond to a couple of comments;

 

"wanabe elitist attempting to troll"

Far from it. I just want to be enlightened.

 

"why do you need a GPS to explore"

I've used a map and compass for years, long before GPS and even before Loran, but I have one for a number of reasons including: Convenience of navigation when I am hiking, paddling, pedaling or driving; interest in seeing where I went after the fact; and also because many times for the areas that I explore the maps are inaccurate or lacking detail.

 

From the comments in the assorted responses, I can now envision the appeal. I just go about my exploring a different way, and I enjoy reaching locations that hadn't been trampled on my dozens or hundreds of others. When I reach an area that I've navigated to I leave with a photograph or more often just with a pleasant memory of the efforts required to get to an interesting spot that few others had been to.

 

P.S. Beyond my old maps and compasses, I've hung onto my old slide rules, coaster brake ballon tire bikes and other old technology.

 

I'm very curious... why did you bother to create an account, and post this thread? It sure doesn't sound like you have the least bit of interest in geocaching. So... I ask you in turn: what's the point?

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For me, sometimes, it's an excuse for a trip, whether that trip is a detour of a few miles on my bike ride to/from work, a hike of several miles through the woods, or a drive to somewhere off the beaten path.

 

Sometimes, it's about interesting places, whether those places are historic, scenic, or artistic. (I especially enjoy caches that draw attention to public art.)

 

Sometimes, it's about the challenge, whether the challenge is solving a puzzle, finding a well-camouflaged cache, or retrieving a cleverly placed container. (I especially enjoy on-site puzzles and caches with 4-star camouflage.)

 

And sometimes it's about companionship, although I don't make it to events, unevents, and group hikes very often...

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I kind of lump this in with the same type who uses a GPS to take the same route to work every day that only involves one or two turns.

So, you think it's that easy? That you just push a button, follow the arrow, and walk right up to it?

 

No way, it's a lot more difficult than that!

 

Typically, you will have to figure out how to drive there and where to park. Then, find the trail, if there is one. You may have to cross water, or other natural barriers. Once you reach the cache location, you still have to figure out where it is hidden. The GPS cannot tell you that. Some caches are hidden hidden so well, I have looked for hours and still not found them yet.

 

The above description is only for the basic style of cache. Other styles require finding several hidden objects, or solving puzzles, riddles, or whatever.

 

It's actually pretty difficult sometimes.

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The point was that maybe I could learn something or gain an interest. I looked online at aspects of geocaching and found the site identifying survey monuments and the searching for them. I could enjoy that.

 

Well, knock yourself out! But if it doesn't work, try to avoid running over to the Benchmarking forums, and asking them why they want to find brass plates and survey points in the middle of no where!

 

Everyone has a hobby. Not every hobby is for everyone.

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Well maybe it is an attempt at trolling or not. I know I didnt even look at the forums for over a year when I stated caching. But way to many times we tend to put our own emotion into some one's typed words. I have hiked and camped since I was a young kid. I know how to use a map and compass. I bought a GPSr because I thought it would be cool to take along hiking. Thats how I found about Geocaching. Its some thing to do wile in the woods I thinks it great fun to find an ammo can wile on a long hike. Thats how I play the game. Every one else does it different. That is the fun of it. I no longer have any angst over FTF LPC's or power trails. What ever floats your boat. I dont care about your numbers or your stats. I do care about mine because they are mine. Take your new toy and go find a cache. If you get a small thrill like we all do when you find it then great. If not,, go fishing then :laughing:

 

On a side note Im a Vol Fireman and just last week a neighboring company had to go and rescue an person whos cars was stuck out in the middle of a snow packed field at 9:30 pm. The person was following a road that turned into a tractor path. Why? because the gps told them to go that way :unsure::blink::P

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For what it's worth, "for purposes of exploring" sums up what a great deal of geocaching is all about.

 

If you have the skills to use maps, compasses, and so on, a gps unit is only one more tool in your arsenal. For those who don't have the skills, a gps unit helps get them out there and exploring, rather than sitting on a couch watching television.

 

And hopefully, some of those who don't have the skills will eventually learn them.

 

I do it because I enjoy it. Some people knit. I geocache.

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To respond to a couple of comments;

 

"wanabe elitist attempting to troll"

Far from it. I just want to be enlightened.

 

 

Not in the friendliest manner, but yeah, I know.

 

Is there anything we can say to convince you, or would that be a waste of our time?

Why would you even want to? The world needs more orienteering devotees and many fewer geocachers.
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Starting with the original Post

Why ... because i enjoy it.

For many of the reasons listed above.

For the technology bit of it... its what is coming... get used to it.

I lead a Scout group and we teach the young people in our charge to use paper maps and compass, GPSr and the stars for navigation.

Also when i go Caching i use the same maps and compass as i would normally, but these are in an electronic form on my GPSr, and if i am going out along way from home i take a paper map and compass as a back up.

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When I was first told about geocaching, I didn't think it sounded much fun. But then I tried it and that all changed. I already enjoyed walking in the countryside, so doing that with the additional excitement of searching for the caches was huge fun. I use maps and a GPSr.

 

Like many others have said, geocaching takes you to new places all the time. And I've made lots of new friends as well. Another aspect is the logging of the caches once you've found (or not found) them. That builds up a fascinating online record, I suppose it's akin to any other sort of collection. There's also logging and following trackables, solving the puzzles, racing to get First-to-Find... and of course dreaming up ideas for placing your own caches. There's a lot to recommend!

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One of the biggest reasons we cache is to find new places.

 

I have been an avid hiker since I was a child. When I moved to Florida 26 years ago I immediately began searching for places to hike. I found quite a few with the aid of maps and other publicly available resources. I thought I had a fair handle on most of the cool places to hike around central Florida.

Then along comes geocaching. I had used GPS units for years for hiking, fishing, emergency services, etc... and heard about this crazy game of hiding containers. The wife and I gave it a try for fun and found a few close to home. One of our first finds was in a park that was not 2 miles from home but was a place we didn't know about.

 

Hmmmm....this is interesting, I thought. After doing all the research we had done for years and surfing the web looking for places like this, here I was getting lead directly to a place that was new to me by this little game. The park was there all the time, it was just on a side road we had not explored. There are no signs on any of the roads leading to the park until you are at the park entrance.

 

Since then in the 4 years we have been caching, I couldn't begin to count all the new places we have found as a direct result of caches being hidden there. This includes places with interesting views, places that are so remote that you would be amazed to believe that any people have ever gone there, places that have very interesting history, and places that were heavily populated with wildlife that provided amazing experiences just to be there and see them. We found a cache at a relatively unknown historical site with a well and remainder of a barracks from when the Spanish were in control of Florida. It's literally in the middle of a residential area and is cordoned off with a little plaque to explain the site. There are no signs indicating it is there anywhere that we could find. No signs on the street, entering the neighborhood, nothing. I even checked the local historical literature and tried to find any reference to this place in any other form but I didn't see anything else referencing this site. Without geocaching, it would be difficult if not impossible for the average person living here, let alone a tourist, to find.

 

So geocaching is very helpful for finding new places, both for the person who has lived in the area for years, and for the occasional tourist coming to the area who might want to see something outside the normal "touristy" spots that are so highly publicized.

 

In addition, my wife has managed to lose 80 lbs., mostly fueled by our desire to go out and see all the new places we keep finding. Even after 4 years of doing this, I still manage to find new places. Another new one just opened up about a month ago here in our area with a couple of hiking trails. How did I find out it was newly opened? Some new caches just got put out there. Now I have yet another new place to go and hike. Finding it was easy because of geocaching.

 

Caches are hidden in all kinds of places and environments. If you will give it a chance, caching can really expand your ability to explore the parts of the world you enjoy the most.

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I was attracted to geocaching by this woman.....

splinterheads.jpg

 

Then I found out she was only acting,

so Ive been told, there are no women in the nerd sport of geocaching,

another Hollywood myth.

 

scratch that, no SINGLE women in the sport of geocaching.

Wrong again. I've seen a few very attractive ones.

 

Edit: Decided to keep my opinions to myself. :laughing::rolleyes:

Edited by WhoDis
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I am sure that I will make more than a few angry, but what is the point of geocaching? Use of an electronic device to direct one to an object seems pointless. The use of a GPS to do this takes away from knowledge of maps, map symbols, use of features to route, compass use, etc. Sure, you can argue that you still need to select a path to get to your object, but what is the skill outside of that? If you want to argue that it gets you out of the house and moving around for the purpose of a treasure hunt, then fine, but I can't envision an explaination greater than that. I kind of lump this in with the same type who uses a GPS to take the same route to work every day that only involves one or two turns. Somebody enlighten me.

 

Erich in MI

 

P.S. I do have a GPS, and have had one for 15 years. I recently bought a new one for purposes of exploring.

 

I see you have No finds and no hides. Was the only reason for creating an account for writing this topic?

I would say YOU try finding AT LEAST 1 geocache and then lets see where your opinion goes. :unsure:

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I am sure that I will make more than a few angry, but what is the point of geocaching? Use of an electronic device to direct one to an object seems pointless. The use of a GPS to do this takes away from knowledge of maps, map symbols, use of features to route, compass use, etc. Sure, you can argue that you still need to select a path to get to your object, but what is the skill outside of that? If you want to argue that it gets you out of the house and moving around for the purpose of a treasure hunt, then fine, but I can't envision an explaination greater than that. I kind of lump this in with the same type who uses a GPS to take the same route to work every day that only involves one or two turns. Somebody enlighten me.

 

Erich in MI

 

P.S. I do have a GPS, and have had one for 15 years. I recently bought a new one for purposes of exploring.

 

There are a lot of posts already, but I wanted to use a cliche. "It is trying to tell a stranger about Rock and Roll...".

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I am sure that I will make more than a few angry, but what is the point of geocaching? Use of an electronic device to direct one to an object seems pointless. The use of a GPS to do this takes away from knowledge of maps, map symbols, use of features to route, compass use, etc. Sure, you can argue that you still need to select a path to get to your object, but what is the skill outside of that? If you want to argue that it gets you out of the house and moving around for the purpose of a treasure hunt, then fine, but I can't envision an explaination greater than that. I kind of lump this in with the same type who uses a GPS to take the same route to work every day that only involves one or two turns. Somebody enlighten me.

 

Erich in MI

 

P.S. I do have a GPS, and have had one for 15 years. I recently bought a new one for purposes of exploring.

 

I see you have No finds and no hides. Was the only reason for creating an account for writing this topic?

I would say YOU try finding AT LEAST 1 geocache and then lets see where your opinion goes. :unsure:

 

"It is trying to tell a stranger about Rock and Roll...".

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Understood. Didn't mean to ruffle any feathers with my arrogant approach. I am more dismayed with the lessor use of map and compass, and the dieing skill among the masses. Both my older kids have a GPS for their cars and neither have seemed to have grasped any mapreading skills I've tried to teach them. They now solely use their GPS to find places.

 

So, are you teaching them how to use a slide rule, too?

 

Sure, the transition to new technology leaves behind the old, and I do think there is a danger in becoming too dependent on technology. Some of the old skills need to be preserved, taught and passed on. Technology will not always be there.

 

Imagine some trailblazer, though, lamenting the fact that his children no long no how to read the animal tracks, skat, bushes, rocks and trees, but now are overly dependent on the compass they bought at the trading post, and some maps given to them by the new trapper.

 

Anyway, as has been pointed out, the skills you mentioned can be, and are used in geocaching sometimes. It is a fun challenge. And, the technology, in some ways is incidental, yet still part of the fun.

 

Goecaching has been a very enriching experience. Could I have done it with only map and compass, or would I have? Doubtful, very doubtfull.

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