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SydneyJabs98

Best Geocache Containers You Can Find Around the House?

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...wet, soaking wet at times....yep, it's a conundrum.

True. There are no guarantees in this game, only probabilities. That's why I, like you, prefer ammo cans. I feel an ammo can has the best chance, of any container I can afford, of staying dry inside. While I've had a couple ammo cans get wet inside due to some foreign object, (edge of a baggie, leaf, etc), getting caught in the seal and creating a wicking action, drawing moisture in, the most common cause of death, for mine, has been poor choices in traded swag. Specifically, bubble soap. It's at a point now where, if I see a log come in for one of my hides, and it has words to the effect of, "left bubble soap", I drop everything and rush out there to remove it. If Jeremy were to grant me the boon of adding one more guideline, it would read "DO NOT LEAVE BUBBLE SOAP IN A CACHE... EVER!... OR WE WILL FIND YOU AND BEAT YOU WITH ROTTING LEMMING CORPSES!" :lol:

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OK, I desparately want to hide a Geocache, but before I spend ANY money on a container that's going to be open to the elements, I want to make sure that there are no household items that could be used. What should I use? Any size is OK. :)

 

P.S.~ I was considering using a fairly large plastic pretzel container... would that be a bad idea since it's plastic???

 

I go to the thrift stores and look for small, wide-mouth thermos-type containers. I spray paint them in earth tones, of course, since they tend to come in bright red or blue. The longest that I have had one in the wild is seven months—so far so good. I will check it after the spring snow melt and see how it is holding up.

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OK, I desparately want to hide a Geocache, but before I spend ANY money on a container that's going to be open to the elements, I want to make sure that there are no household items that could be used. What should I use? Any size is OK. :)

 

P.S.~ I was considering using a fairly large plastic pretzel container... would that be a bad idea since it's plastic???

 

A pretzel container might work if cachers will always replace it upright, and there's no chance it will bob in water or keel over on its side. You could be running out to do maintenance if the container lands on its side in water or melting snow.

 

The best things you might have around the house are Lock n Locks.

 

Second, peanut butter jars, mayonnaise jars, marshmallow creme jars as already mentioned. Plastic container, no narrower neck, with screw top. Wash thoroughly. Baking soda or newsprint to help get rid of the smell. Soak in a bleach solution.

 

Something else that I don't think has been mentioned is test strip containers. If you know someone who is diabetic, the glucose strip containers make pretty good micros. They're about the size of film cans but better at keeping water out.

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I've been running some tests at my house in preparation of my first hide. I took several containers from around the house and put them outside during the heavy rain we've been getting in L.A. recently. I put a piece of paper inside to see if, after a few weeks, I could sign the paper. The pretzel jar surprised me with how well it did, even after I tipped it on its side mid-week. Now, that doesn't cover all of the rigors of Geocaching, nor does it speak to long-term longevity, but it was dry as a bone inside after about a month of heavy rain.

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I've encountered the widely acclaimed ammo boxes with soaked contents and perfectly dry caches in containers that I thought no way could this thing have stayed dry for many years - but they did.

 

I once placed a Slim Bob - a small camo taped baggie, a pathetic excuse for a cache container. My intent was to get back fast and replace it. 4 years later, I archived and removed that Slim Bob - bone dry.

 

I've seen large pretzel jars, out for years in the dirt, dry, prescription pill bottles, dry.

Lock and locks, wet, soaking wet at times....yep, it's a conundrum.

 

There are a couple of moderately prolific placers of PB jar caches around me. Some wet, some dry..

 

I still try to place ammo cans whenever possible, as being the cheapest likely option, fewer maintenance visits, and the most satisfying find - heck even if it is burnt or wet, the finder has no doubt they found the cache.

You can't say that about most homegrown plastic containers.

The truth is, any container will work well if it is hidden in the right spot. I once found a micro made out of an old metal automobile fuse container. Should have been a terrible container. It had been out for quite some time, but the log was bone dry. Why? It was hidden in a picnic shelter.

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The truth is, any container will work well if it is hidden in the right spot.

Yup. Unfortunately, most folks who utilize crappy containers fail to find " the right spot".

Maybe Groundspeak could put together a tutorial explaining proper spot finding?

 

A potential preview:

 

Film can = in a camera bag, in your closet.

Hide a key = under your front porch. (with a key in it, not paper)

Altoids tin = in your top, left dresser drawer, or vehicle glove box.

Medicine bottle = in your medicine cabinet.

Gladware = in your kitchen cabinet or fridge.

Ammo can = out in the woods.

Bison design tubes (the real ones) = out in the woods.

Lock & Locks (the real ones) = out in the woods.

Performs = out in the woods.

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The truth is, any container will work well if it is hidden in the right spot.

Yup. Unfortunately, most folks who utilize crappy containers fail to find " the right spot".

Maybe Groundspeak could put together a tutorial explaining proper spot finding?

 

A potential preview:

 

Film can = in a camera bag, in your closet.

Hide a key = under your front porch. (with a key in it, not paper)

Altoids tin = in your top, left dresser drawer, or vehicle glove box.

Medicine bottle = in your medicine cabinet.

Gladware = in your kitchen cabinet or fridge.

Ammo can = out in the woods.

Bison design tubes (the real ones) = out in the woods.

Lock & Locks (the real ones) = out in the woods.

Performs = out in the woods.

Wow...............so if we don't have any woods nearby, we can't hide caches? Now that's "crappy"!

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.

Wow...............so if we don't have any woods nearby, we can't hide caches? Now that's "crappy"!

Wow. All that text and this silliness is all you were able to get out of it?

I can see why a whole host of P&Gs are so appealing to you. :unsure:

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I use these plastic jars that used to contain chicken and beef consommé powder. As the powder needs to stay dry, the containers' cap screws on tight and keeps the moisture out. Problem is that I only empty a couple of these each year.

Yes, these are very good containers.

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I have had two ammo cans muggled in areas that require caches to be within reach of the trail, probably because they are so big and can easily be exposed if not re-hidden properly. I replaced one with a smaller Gladware plastic container, but it recently was reported to be filled with water after a rain storm, so that was a poor choice. I replaced the other one with a plastic trail mix container from Target that has a screw-on wide-mouth lid that I spray painted, and it has held up perfectly. I also used to have a "small" pill bottle hide, but the log book got shredded from the narrow-mouth lid.

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I have had two ammo cans muggled in areas that require caches to be within reach of the trail, probably because they are so big and can easily be exposed if not re-hidden properly. I replaced one with a smaller Gladware plastic container, but it recently was reported to be filled with water after a rain storm, so that was a poor choice. I replaced the other one with a plastic trail mix container from Target that has a screw-on wide-mouth lid that I spray painted, and it has held up perfectly. I also used to have a "small" pill bottle hide, but the log book got shredded from the narrow-mouth lid.

 

You replaced an ammo can with Gladware??? :o I hope you are wearing your fireproof underwear.

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I've used racquetball conainers. Usually the 3 ball instead of the 2. They've all held up well.

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I've used racquetball conainers. Usually the 3 ball instead of the 2. They've all held up well.

 

Someone placed a tennis ball container in the mountains N/W of Mailbu, CA. It didn't do so well. The heat literally deformed the metal ring on the lip of the container, thus the lid couldn't seal it.

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I've used racquetball conainers. Usually the 3 ball instead of the 2. They've all held up well.

 

Someone placed a tennis ball container in the mountains N/W of Mailbu, CA. It didn't do so well. The heat literally deformed the metal ring on the lip of the container, thus the lid couldn't seal it.

Thats an apples to oranges comparison, or should I say racquetball to tennisball. Not the same type of container at all.

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I've used racquetball conainers. Usually the 3 ball instead of the 2. They've all held up well.

 

Someone placed a tennis ball container in the mountains N/W of Mailbu, CA. It didn't do so well. The heat literally deformed the metal ring on the lip of the container, thus the lid couldn't seal it.

Thats an apples to oranges comparison, or should I say racquetball to tennisball. Not the same type of container at all.

 

Sorry, next time I'm by the Sports store, I'll take a look. I assumed that they were similar.

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How about old plastic bottles, pill,peanut butter,cottage cheese containers, yogurt. Good luck.

 

Sure! If you want to replace it every 4 to 6 months, these will work.

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I've used racquetball conainers. Usually the 3 ball instead of the 2. They've all held up well.

 

Someone placed a tennis ball container in the mountains N/W of Mailbu, CA. It didn't do so well. The heat literally deformed the metal ring on the lip of the container, thus the lid couldn't seal it.

Thats an apples to oranges comparison, or should I say racquetball to tennisball. Not the same type of container at all.

 

Sorry, next time I'm by the Sports store, I'll take a look. I assumed that they were similar.

 

I didn't know the difference either so I did a web search. Looks like raquetballs come in screw top hard plastic containers

 

RACQUETBALLS.jpg

 

Tennis balls tend to come in the pop-off (not screwtop) lids:

 

8819098S.jpg

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How about old plastic bottles, pill,peanut butter,cottage cheese containers, yogurt. Good luck.
Sure! If you want to replace it every 4 to 6 months, these will work.
Unless stores in your area sell cottage cheese and yogurt in very different containers than the stores around here, those containers won't last anywhere near 4-6 months. Containers like that get brittle and crack, and don't even hold up during our dry summers. During our wet winters, they're hopeless. (Semi-disposable containers like Gladware fall into the same category.)

 

Peanut butter jars are surprisingly weather resistant. When covered with camouflage or tape, they hold up well to the sun's UV light. The only problems I've seen have been with animals chewing on them. Eliminating the food smell from any food container is difficult.

 

Plastic prescription pill bottles are brittle, and aren't actually very weather resistant. Plastic over-the-counter pill bottles are more durable and weather resistant, but have narrow openings that make it difficult to get the log out.

 

Wide-mouth plastic water bottles work well, and there are no problems with food smells.

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If you do use a plastic container I highly recommend you paint it! this will protect the plastic from cracking in the sun and heavy weather conditions overtime, plus makes excellent cammo. ;)

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I've used racquetball conainers. Usually the 3 ball instead of the 2. They've all held up well.

 

Someone placed a tennis ball container in the mountains N/W of Mailbu, CA. It didn't do so well. The heat literally deformed the metal ring on the lip of the container, thus the lid couldn't seal it.

Thats an apples to oranges comparison, or should I say racquetball to tennisball. Not the same type of container at all.

 

Sorry, next time I'm by the Sports store, I'll take a look. I assumed that they were similar.

 

I didn't know the difference either so I did a web search. Looks like raquetballs come in screw top hard plastic containers

 

RACQUETBALLS.jpg

 

Tennis balls tend to come in the pop-off (not screwtop) lids:

 

8819098S.jpg

 

Thanks, It is obvious that they are different.

BTW if you're hiding one of these in my area, you better paint it or wrap it in tape.

The Sun can be a bitch

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If you do use a plastic container I highly recommend you paint it! this will protect the plastic from cracking in the sun and heavy weather conditions overtime, plus makes excellent cammo. ;)

 

Be veywee veywee careful to choose the right paint. Some paint, due to solvent content, will instantly attack the plastic and, while nicely camoed, make it snap crackle pop the first time pressure is applied. I do like the paint option though, it can indeed make some killer camo.

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OK, I desparately want to hide a Geocache, but before I spend ANY money on a container that's going to be open to the elements, I want to make sure that there are no household items that could be used. What should I use? Any size is OK. :)

 

P.S.~ I was considering using a fairly large plastic pretzel container... would that be a bad idea since it's plastic???

 

Yep, the pretzel jar is nice and big, but it won't hold up well. The PB jar is much better, if you happen to have one. Some thermos bottles can be nice...if they have a wide mouth. The same is true with the aluminum or heavy plastic bottles (canteens) desigend to carry drinks while you are hiking or biking. They usually have a good seal to keep water from leaking out.....which also helps to keep water from leaking in. :rolleyes: Look for them at your local thrift store of flea market to get them cheap.

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We took an empty twist and pour plastic paint container, washed it out thoroughly and covered it in cammo tape. It's been out in the woods for over 2 years and it's holding up very well.

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I've used racquetball conainers. Usually the 3 ball instead of the 2. They've all held up well.

 

Someone placed a tennis ball container in the mountains N/W of Mailbu, CA. It didn't do so well. The heat literally deformed the metal ring on the lip of the container, thus the lid couldn't seal it.

Thats an apples to oranges comparison, or should I say racquetball to tennisball. Not the same type of container at all.

 

Sorry, next time I'm by the Sports store, I'll take a look. I assumed that they were similar.

 

I didn't know the difference either so I did a web search. Looks like raquetballs come in screw top hard plastic containers

 

RACQUETBALLS.jpg

 

Tennis balls tend to come in the pop-off (not screwtop) lids:

 

8819098S.jpg

 

Thanks, It is obvious that they are different.

BTW if you're hiding one of these in my area, you better paint it or wrap it in tape.

The Sun can be a bitch

 

I've had no issues, but yes I would cammo it. BTW if it's in the sun, it's not hidden very well in my opinion. I've had one bigger than the ones shown. 3 ball opposed to 2. So it's a big small. DNFed numerous times, with many posting a found it and admitting they've gone back several times, plus some emails for hints. Many containers will work fine if you hide them right. I think the plastic may be a little heavier than the tennis, although I'm not sure on that.

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Nobody has mentioned my favorite container.

 

It's a Kool-Aid or Lemonade screw top container. Very waterproof and holds a decent amount of swag.

 

Try it, you'll like it.

 

Team Triggerfinger

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This one wasn't found around the house but rather at the shop where I work.

It's a 2 inch ball valve. Actually, I have FOUR of them after a piece of equipment was moved.

 

I am going to take one of them and secure it in the forest somehow. It will be connected to an elbow and then a pipe about 20 feet long. The general idea is that it will look like a normal "official" pipe coming out of the ground but getting the cache will require opening the ball valve and flushing the cache out of the pipe by pouring water into the pipe. After signing the log, the cacher should return the cache back to the ball valve area and close the valve, thus sealing it safely for the next cacher.

 

The ball valve looks like this one except it's gray.

 

coo15.jpg

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I've been toying with the idea of using some of the sample containers at the lab I work at. We've got all kinds of different tubes.

http://www.usascientific.com/Seal-Rite-2.0-ml-tube.aspx

http://www.usascientific.com/2.0ml-round-cryovial-skirt.aspx

http://www.usascientific.com/15ml-conical-tube-bulk.aspx

http://www.usascientific.com/50ml-conical-tube-racks-sterile.aspx

 

I can get them for free, and they are often kept in -20C (-4F) or -80C (-112F) freezers. I am dubious about the ones in the first link, I may put them through some testing first. But I think all the others should work great, what do you all think?

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I've been toying with the idea of using some of the sample containers at the lab I work at. We've got all kinds of different tubes.

http://www.usascientific.com/Seal-Rite-2.0-ml-tube.aspx

http://www.usascientific.com/2.0ml-round-cryovial-skirt.aspx

http://www.usascientific.com/15ml-conical-tube-bulk.aspx

http://www.usascientific.com/50ml-conical-tube-racks-

sterile.aspx

 

I can get them for free, and they are often kept in -20C (-4F) or -80C (-112F) freezers. I am dubious about the ones in the first link, I may put them through some testing first. But

I think all the others should work great, what do you all think?

 

I have used one similar to the one in the second link, and have some of the ones in the third and fourth link for my next caches. I have had it out for about a year, and never a complaint about dampness or leaks.

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I've been toying with the idea of using some of the sample containers at the lab I work at. We've got all kinds of different tubes.

http://www.usascientific.com/Seal-Rite-2.0-ml-tube.aspx

http://www.usascientific.com/2.0ml-round-cryovial-skirt.aspx

http://www.usascientific.com/15ml-conical-tube-bulk.aspx

http://www.usascientific.com/50ml-conical-tube-racks-sterile.aspx

 

I can get them for free, and they are often kept in -20C (-4F) or -80C (-112F) freezers. I am dubious about the ones in the first link, I may put them through some testing first. But I think all the others should work great, what do you all think?

 

That second one looks like it would make a nice micro and at over $211 a piece you probably won't anyone else using them.

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The first one is going to fail if your environment has more than 000.001% humidity. The second makes for a great container. If I read it right, it's $211 for a sleeve of 100? Or is that price for a case of $500? $2 each seems kinda steep when you can get a preform for about $0.60 each. I haven't tried the third, so no comment, other than to inquire about what a "sealing ring" is. I've still got several of the fourth one laying around. I bought them in bulk, and after testing, gave most of them away. The plastic was so pliable that when the temperature changed, it lost its water resistant seal.

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I pick up Lock and Locks on sale...a couple have become lunch boxes (oh, I have sinned!) but we still have some we can spray paint and hide. Ammo can would be good - better than some of the containers we found recently.

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How about old plastic bottles, pill,peanut butter,cottage cheese containers, yogurt. Good luck.

cottage cheese and yogurt are terrible choices.

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The truth is, any container will work well if it is hidden in the right spot.

Yup. Unfortunately, most folks who utilize crappy containers fail to find " the right spot".

Maybe Groundspeak could put together a tutorial explaining proper spot finding?

 

A potential preview:

 

Film can = in a camera bag, in your closet.

Hide a key = under your front porch. (with a key in it, not paper)

Altoids tin = in your top, left dresser drawer, or vehicle glove box.

Medicine bottle = in your medicine cabinet.

Gladware = in your kitchen cabinet or fridge.

Ammo can = out in the woods.

Bison design tubes (the real ones) = out in the woods.

Lock & Locks (the real ones) = out in the woods.

Performs = out in the woods.

Wow...............so if we don't have any woods nearby, we can't hide caches? Now that's "crappy"!

Sure you can. i'm sure you got a walmart, target, autozone, circleK, 7-11 parking lot in your area.

mc donalds, BKs, KFCs all have bushes you could toss a film cannister behind :ph34r:

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The truth is, any container will work well if it is hidden in the right spot.

Yup. Unfortunately, most folks who utilize crappy containers fail to find " the right spot".

Maybe Groundspeak could put together a tutorial explaining proper spot finding?

 

A potential preview:

 

Film can = in a camera bag, in your closet.

Hide a key = under your front porch. (with a key in it, not paper)

Altoids tin = in your top, left dresser drawer, or vehicle glove box.

Medicine bottle = in your medicine cabinet.

Gladware = in your kitchen cabinet or fridge.

Ammo can = out in the woods.

Bison design tubes (the real ones) = out in the woods.

Lock & Locks (the real ones) = out in the woods.

Performs = out in the woods.

Wow...............so if we don't have any woods nearby, we can't hide caches? Now that's "crappy"!

Sure you can. i'm sure you got a walmart, target, autozone, circleK, 7-11 parking lot in your area.

mc donalds, BKs, KFCs all have bushes you could toss a film cannister behind :ph34r:

:laughing: I don't hide film cannisters and I don't hide caches in parking lots either.

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And so, I was cleaning, and discovered...

Once upon a time, in a galaxy far away, I used to tumble rocks. Rock polisher. Take small rocks, put them in the tumbler with water, and grit. Tumble for a few weeks. Change grit to a finer grit,and tumble a few more weeks. &c. Hey! I've got lots of great polished rocks!

Well, unfortunately, it died, and I lost interest. Recently found the container, hiding somewheres. It's waterproof, if closed properly. 5" tall, 4" radius cylinder. "Don't Tumble on the Rocks" is screaming in my mind! Might be my first attempt at PMO. (Hey. I had a nice hide that was evil. People tore the area apart!) May be best to make it an evil mystery cache! That would limit the finders to 'the possessed'. Hopefully, they would be more considerate of the ache and area?

But, that's what I found buried in my closet!

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OK, I desparately want to hide a Geocache, but before I spend ANY money on a container that's going to be open to the elements, I want to make sure that there are no household items that could be used. What should I use? Any size is OK. :)

 

P.S.~ I was considering using a fairly large plastic pretzel container... would that be a bad idea since it's plastic???

Pill bottle, Tupperware tube, LnL, PB Jar, Ammo Can, Bison Tube, Medicine Bottle, Gladware, Altoids Tin anything, as long as it is watertight and it lasts long. :)

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OK, I desparately want to hide a Geocache, but before I spend ANY money on a container that's going to be open to the elements, I want to make sure that there are no household items that could be used. What should I use? Any size is OK. :)

 

P.S.~ I was considering using a fairly large plastic pretzel container... would that be a bad idea since it's plastic???

Pill bottle, Tupperware tube, LnL, PB Jar, Ammo Can, Bison Tube, Medicine Bottle, Gladware, Altoids Tin anything, as long as it is watertight and it lasts long. :)

 

I don't recommend EVER using a food container (including drink mixes, coffe cans, spice jars, etc.) since they tend to atract bugs and other critters, but if you do be sure to wash it thoroughly and bleach the inside to try to remove as much of the food smell as possible. Remember, most critters can smell things we can't.

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OK, I desparately want to hide a Geocache, but before I spend ANY money on a container that's going to be open to the elements, I want to make sure that there are no household items that could be used. What should I use? Any size is OK. :)

 

P.S.~ I was considering using a fairly large plastic pretzel container... would that be a bad idea since it's plastic???

Pill bottle, Tupperware tube, LnL, PB Jar, Ammo Can, Chinese knock off Bison Tube, Prescription Medicine Bottle, Gladware, Altoids Tin anything, as long as it is watertight and it lasts long. :)

Blue = Waterproof

Green = Somewhat Water Resistant

Red = Not Even Remotely Waterproof

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OK, I desparately want to hide a Geocache, but before I spend ANY money on a container that's going to be open to the elements, I want to make sure that there are no household items that could be used. What should I use? Any size is OK. :)

 

P.S.~ I was considering using a fairly large plastic pretzel container... would that be a bad idea since it's plastic???

Pill bottle, Tupperware tube, LnL, PB Jar, Ammo Can, Bison Tube, Medicine Bottle, Gladware, Altoids Tin anything, as long as it is watertight and it lasts long. :)

  • Pill bottle - pharmaceutical pill bottles don't have a lid that seals well. Everyone that I've found that have been outdoors in the rain for more then a week have had damp/wet log sheets
  • LnL - they must be authentic Lock & Locks (with the Lock & Lock seal on the lid). Dollar store and other knock-offs deteriorate quickly - the tabs break off and the seal is inferior
  • PB Jar - Kraft pb jars work well. I cut a circle of thin fun foam to fit the inside of the lid. Acts like a gasket.
  • Medicine bottle - be sure that the neck is not smaller then the body of the container. It's irritating getting the logsheet out of a container with a small neck.
  • Gladware - doesn't last, leaks
  • Altoid tins - rusts up fast, hard to pry it open

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OK, I desparately want to hide a Geocache, but before I spend ANY money on a container that's going to be open to the elements, I want to make sure that there are no household items that could be used. What should I use? Any size is OK. :)

 

P.S.~ I was considering using a fairly large plastic pretzel container... would that be a bad idea since it's plastic???

Pill bottle, Tupperware tube, LnL, PB Jar, Ammo Can, Bison Tube, Medicine Bottle, Gladware, Altoids Tin anything, as long as it is watertight and it lasts long. :)

 

I don't recommend EVER using a food container (including drink mixes, coffe cans, spice jars, etc.) since they tend to atract bugs and other critters, but if you do be sure to wash it thoroughly and bleach the inside to try to remove as much of the food smell as possible. Remember, most critters can smell things we can't.

 

after cleaning plastic & metal coffee cans in the aforementioned ways, i also spray the inside with bug/mosquito spray, put the lid back on for a few days, then open up and camo paint inside and out...of course, using a heavy duty freezer bag inside to keep log & swag dry...this has cut down to zilch the # of bugs inside and i can have an inexpensive regular container for my in-the-city urban hides that thwart the efforts of critters small and large... B)

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OK, I desparately want to hide a Geocache, but before I spend ANY money on a container that's going to be open to the elements, I want to make sure that there are no household items that could be used. What should I use? Any size is OK. :)

 

P.S.~ I was considering using a fairly large plastic pretzel container... would that be a bad idea since it's plastic???

Pill bottle, Tupperware tube, LnL, PB Jar, Ammo Can, Bison Tube, Medicine Bottle, Gladware, Altoids Tin anything, as long as it is watertight and it lasts long. :)

  • Pill bottle - pharmaceutical pill bottles don't have a lid that seals well. Everyone that I've found that have been outdoors in the rain for more then a week have had damp/wet log sheets
  • LnL - they must be authentic Lock & Locks (with the Lock & Lock seal on the lid). Dollar store and other knock-offs deteriorate quickly - the tabs break off and the seal is inferior
  • PB Jar - Kraft pb jars work well. I cut a circle of thin fun foam to fit the inside of the lid. Acts like a gasket.
  • Medicine bottle - be sure that the neck is not smaller then the body of the container. It's irritating getting the logsheet out of a container with a small neck.
  • Gladware - doesn't last, leaks
  • Altoid tins - rusts up fast, hard to pry it open

 

Man, is there about a year old account in my area with 100 finds and 50 hides who needs to see this. I'd tell him myself, but he doesn't interact with people, and seems disinterested in our events. If it's a household item, and makes a bad geocaching container, he's used it. Lay's Potato chip containers, metal coffee cans, metal peanut cans, altoids tins, Pill bottles, etc..

 

Anywho, I agree with what Lone R said above. :)

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after cleaning plastic & metal coffee cans in the aforementioned ways, i also spray the inside with bug/mosquito spray, put the lid back on for a few days, then open up and camo paint inside and out...of course, using a heavy duty freezer bag inside to keep log & swag dry...this has cut down to zilch the # of bugs inside and i can have an inexpensive regular container for my in-the-city urban hides that thwart the efforts of critters small and large... B)

 

I understand what you're trying to do, but I think spraying the inside of a cache with poison may not be a great thing to do. If you're completely painting the inside of the container (and the lid?), then the poison will do nothing. If you're not covering it completely, then you're coating something with poison that people will be putting their hands in, including children. Lots of people have contact reactions or allergies to bug poisons. Not every parent would appreciate this.

 

So, I'd urge you to NOT do this, find a repellant that's NOT poison or post it loud and clear on the cache and it's webpage.

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OK, I desparately want to hide a Geocache, but before I spend ANY money on a container that's going to be open to the elements, I want to make sure that there are no household items that could be used. What should I use? Any size is OK. :)

 

P.S.~ I was considering using a fairly large plastic pretzel container... would that be a bad idea since it's plastic???

 

With 10 pages of replies this must have been said already but I'll second it if it has. Forget about hiding your own caches for awhile. Go out and enjoy finding a few hundred caches yourself first. By that time you will have seen a wide variety of cache containers and will be able to make an educated decision about what does and doesn't make a good container. Let experience be your guide and you'll end up placing a better cache that will stick around for the long haul.

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OK, I desparately want to hide a Geocache, but before I spend ANY money on a container that's going to be open to the elements, I want to make sure that there are no household items that could be used. What should I use? Any size is OK. :)

 

P.S.~ I was considering using a fairly large plastic pretzel container... would that be a bad idea since it's plastic???

 

With 10 pages of replies this must have been said already but I'll second it if it has. Forget about hiding your own caches for awhile. Go out and enjoy finding a few hundred caches yourself first. By that time you will have seen a wide variety of cache containers and will be able to make an educated decision about what does and doesn't make a good container. Let experience be your guide and you'll end up placing a better cache that will stick around for the long haul.

I was hoping that in the 2.5 years since Sydney posted that question that she might have done just that.

Sadly, she still shows only 4 finds, and hasn't been back since January 2011.

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I agree that peanut butter containers are very good. I covered one with fake leaves to protect it and to add some camo, so I hope it lasts a while! So far it has been buried in the snow for about a week and a half and is keeping out water. I would recommend a PB jar because they are very inexpensive and are the perfect size.

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Can you ensure that someone with peanut allergies won't react to your peanut butter jar? Can you clean it well enough to keep animals or insects from detecting the smell of the food?

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I agree that peanut butter containers are very good. I covered one with fake leaves to protect it and to add some camo, so I hope it lasts a while! So far it has been buried in the snow for about a week and a half and is keeping out water. I would recommend a PB jar because they are very inexpensive and are the perfect size.

I thought ammo cans were the perfect size. Guess not...

If I were going to recommend a container, I'd recommend it for it's ability to keep out water.

Only a few miles from you, I've found a few pb jars and only found one dry inside (cave tunnel).

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Can you ensure that someone with peanut allergies won't react to your peanut butter jar? Can you clean it well enough to keep animals or insects from detecting the smell of the food?

 

It would be interesting to hear from geocachers who have peanut allergies or cache with people who do. I would suspect that they don't open pb jar containers, just to be on the safe side. If it were me, I would probably take a photo, write in the online log that I couldn't sign the logbook because of a peanut allergy but could send photo proof of the find if required by the CO.

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I was thinking about used coke bottles, the 20 ounce size or maybe the 2 litre size. Haven't tried it yet but I bet it would keep the oontents dry for quite a while.

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Can you ensure that someone with peanut allergies won't react to your peanut butter jar? Can you clean it well enough to keep animals or insects from detecting the smell of the food?

 

Maybe cleaning it with bleach or ammonia???

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