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SydneyJabs98

Best Geocache Containers You Can Find Around the House?

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OK, I desparately want to hide a Geocache, but before I spend ANY money on a container that's going to be open to the elements, I want to make sure that there are no household items that could be used. What should I use? Any size is OK. :)

 

P.S.~ I was considering using a fairly large plastic pretzel container... would that be a bad idea since it's plastic???

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OK, I desparately want to hide a Geocache, but before I spend ANY money on a container that's going to be open to the elements, I want to make sure that there are no household items that could be used. What should I use? Any size is OK. :)

 

P.S.~ I was considering using a fairly large plastic pretzel container... would that be a bad idea since it's plastic???

 

Because it's going to be out in the elements you want to use a durable, watertight container. You'll make the majority of cache finders happy if you place a swag size and good quality container.

 

Based on my experience, I'd say the two top containers for cache use would be lock & locks and ammo cans. You can get a small lock n lock for under $5 and a small ammo box for under $10. Both should last at least 3-5 years outdoors. (Likely longer.)

 

If you're going to use a "free" household item then I agree with dfx that peanut butter jars are very good. You might want to wrap the plastic jar in camo tape so the sun doesn't break down the plastic too quickly.

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peanut butter jar.

 

Been thinking about PB jars. You know what would help those? Some of that artsy foam matting (the thin stuff) you can get at Michaels. Just lay the lid down on the stuff then x-acto around. Glue that in to act as a better gasket material than the cardboard that was there originally, wouldn't this keep out the moisture? That and a hiding place out of direct weather/ water.

 

This could work with any jar and probably make them more able to stand the test of time. Of all the jar caches of plastic I have found it is the moisture getting past the seal that is the killer.

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peanut butter jar.

 

Been thinking about PB jars. You know what would help those? Some of that artsy foam matting (the thin stuff) you can get at Michaels. Just lay the lid down on the stuff then x-acto around. Glue that in to act as a better gasket material than the cardboard that was there originally, wouldn't this keep out the moisture? That and a hiding place out of direct weather/ water.

 

This could work with any jar and probably make them more able to stand the test of time. Of all the jar caches of plastic I have found it is the moisture getting past the seal that is the killer.

Actually PB jars seem to be pretty good just as they are. Best is ammo can, next best is Lock and Lock probably followed by a PB jar.

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Hi Sydney! Glad to see you getting into the hiding aspect of the game.

Might I suggest you use the best container available, rather than try to save a few bucks?

Each cache you hide builds on your reputation.

Using something other than great containers might cause folks to think you don't take pride in your hides.

There ain't many things out there better than a standard ammo can. ;)

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I have used asprin, vitamin, and PB containers with great success. When using this type of container, make sure to place it appropriately. I place these containers off the ground (to keep snow, etc. out of them) and as much out of the elements as possible. It is a good idea to place the log in a zip-lock baggie within the container for extra protection. As with any cache, make sure to monitor the logs for any signs that the container requires attention and maintain it. Following this, you should be fine with the pretzel container!

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How about old plastic bottles, pill,peanut butter,cottage cheese containers, yogurt. Good luck.

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Large plastic peanut butter jars are great! Cheap, big and watertight. I have seen peanut butter jars covered in mud and in a puddle here but the contents are bone dry.

 

Since then I now use them. I leave mine as-is but you can camo paint them too.

 

You can fit a good sized log book inside and trade items if you want.

 

I always fill with bleach and water and let it sit a few days. Then run them through the dishwasher. I hide them in the wilderness and haven't had any issues with animals bothering them.

Edited by SeekerOfTheWay

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How about old plastic bottles, pill,peanut butter,cottage cheese containers, yogurt. Good luck.

 

Cottage cheese and yogurt containers (add margarine containers to that list)...ugh. These are classic choices of newbies around here. Thin plastic, the lids split easily, they are not water tight. If you're going to use an old food container use a screw-top type of container (e.g. pb jar, mayo jar). Screw tops seem to be the most durable.

 

For more bad containers see: Photos/Images of bad cache containers

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How about old plastic bottles, pill,peanut butter,cottage cheese containers, yogurt. Good luck.

Please don't! Especially the cottage cheese and yogurt containers! They make terrible containers that just plain do not hold up to the rigors of geocaching.

 

Let me ask the OP a question: what have you got for other hobbies? How much money do you spend on those activities? I'm guessing the answer to that last question is not "nothing", so why should geocaching cost nothing? Spend a little money and get some quality containers... ammo boxes or lock n' locks for regular or small caches, bison tubes and the like for micros. If you hide it well, it will probably be out there for a minimum of a couple of years... you will be glad that you dropped a couple of bucks up front.

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Any plastic container is subject to breaking down in the elements, depending upon where you are.

 

Applying an appropriate color tape cover may help, but consider where you are placing the cache first.

Approach what container and camouflage will be most suitable from there. If it's hidden in a hollow log or stump then Ultra Violet (UV) exposure is at a minimum.

 

UV is the most consistent danger to plastics, drying them out, distorting or making brittle as those long-chain plastic molecules are broken down.

 

Something I have fun with is concrete - a ten pound bag is a mere $2 at the local home/hardware store and it's pretty easy to work with when covering plastic containers for that fake rock look - adding some RIT dyes to the mix can help get a good color to suit location, too. Be sure to leave enough of a gap around the lid for easy removal - sometimes I pack a ring of sand around a lid so the concrete won't get too close, while adding it to the mold.

 

Glass should never be used due to its potential to chip or break.

 

Metal containers with a watertight seal are the best. A coat of suitable color spray paint is often all that's needed.

 

Best of luck with your cache hide!

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Hey, peanut butter jars aren't cheap! Lol

 

I agree though. Ammo cans are the best! You can get them for $6 bucks a can at the geostore on the east coast of FL. They have an online store too. But shipping makes them come out to something like $18 a can.

 

I use ammo cans in ares where there are controlled burns (like Myakka Forest). They survive fires!

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SydneyJabs

Best advice I was given was "Hide what you like to find" - I like to find dry log books in caches with space for a travel bug or two

Lock and Lock / Ammo cans are by far the most durable for our region and are popular worldwide

Genine Tupperware fails quite quickly in my experience

Peanut Butter never seems to lose it's smell for me - animal hazard - although I know others must have the secret deodouriser

35mm film cans don't appear to be consistent, only some stay dry

 

Whatever you choose - have a great hide and enjoy the finders logs for a well maintained cache ;)

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The big plastic pretzel jugs are pretty good for being water tight when new, but they degrade when subjected to sunlight and flexing in cold weather. I thought about using one but figured I would have to replace it every year or more.

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I have used asprin, vitamin, and PB containers with great success. When using this type of container, make sure to place it appropriately. I place these containers off the ground (to keep snow, etc. out of them) and as much out of the elements as possible. It is a good idea to place the log in a zip-lock baggie within the container for extra protection. As with any cache, make sure to monitor the logs for any signs that the container requires attention and maintain it. Following this, you should be fine with the pretzel container!

aspirin325.jpg

The thing about aspirin containers or any jar where the neck is narrower then the body, it can be tough getting the logsheet out of the container.

 

...make sure to place it appropriately...As with any cache, make sure to monitor the logs for any signs that the container requires attention and maintain it.

 

Good advice.

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Any plastic container is subject to breaking down in the elements, depending upon where you are.

 

Applying an appropriate color tape cover may help, but consider where you are placing the cache first.

Approach what container and camouflage will be most suitable from there. If it's hidden in a hollow log or stump then Ultra Violet (UV) exposure is at a minimum.

 

UV is the most consistent danger to plastics, drying them out, distorting or making brittle as those long-chain plastic molecules are broken down.

 

Something I have fun with is concrete - a ten pound bag is a mere $2 at the local home/hardware store and it's pretty easy to work with when covering plastic containers for that fake rock look - adding some RIT dyes to the mix can help get a good color to suit location, too. Be sure to leave enough of a gap around the lid for easy removal - sometimes I pack a ring of sand around a lid so the concrete won't get too close, while adding it to the mold.

 

Glass should never be used due to its potential to chip or break.

 

Metal containers with a watertight seal are the best. A coat of suitable color spray paint is often all that's needed.

 

Best of luck with your cache hide!

 

Can you post a picture of one of your concrete caches? I would love to see that.

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I replaced a peanut butter jar this year that had been a cache for five years. The lid broke. It was in a shady spot but had no camouflage on it and was completely exposed to the elements where it sat (on top of an old rail road piling). Prior to the lid breaking it was never wet inside. Peanut butter jars are my favorite recycled cache container. This year I've found tried and true containers of all types that are wet inside. Including ammo cans, decon containers, and lock-n-locks. Every cache need to be maintained.

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I replaced a peanut butter jar this year that had been a cache for five years. The lid broke. It was in a shady spot but had no camouflage on it and was completely exposed to the elements where it sat (on top of an old rail road piling). Prior to the lid breaking it was never wet inside. Peanut butter jars are my favorite recycled cache container. This year I've found tried and true containers of all types that are wet inside. Including ammo cans, decon containers, and lock-n-locks. Every cache need to be maintained.

 

The issue I've seen with ammo cans are the hinge pins can corrode over time and snap. Happened to one of my ammo can hides. The can was out in the wild for 3 years before the pins failed.

 

Decon containers - the lids are hard to snap down.

 

Lock n locks -- not all lock n locks are real. The dollar store variety looks the same but seals poorly and the tabs snap off easily.

 

Also the environment matters. I hear that lock n locks in the desert (Sonora, Mojave, etc.) don't last long - but that would be true of most plastics. Ammo cans are probably the best bet for desert environments.

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I agree with most of the suggestions already given. I have just a few things to add....

 

As mentioned, use bleach on any container that had contained food. Make sure to especially get it on the rim and lid where critters seem to like to chew most.

 

An UNUSED specimen jar makes a very good smaller container. Most nurses can get you some of these.

 

I also would highly recommend an Igloo brand water jug with a screw-on lid. ONLY Igloo brand has a silicone seal that makes them water-tight. The pour spout should be glued/screwed down as it will have no practical use as a geocaching container. I've had one of these weighted down with cement that routinely gets submerged in flood waters for the last few years. The insides has always stayed dry until our last flood. (I'm pretty sure the previous cacher didn't screw the lid down fully. All screw top lid containers can be subject to this human failure.) Because it also has double walls filled with foam insulation, you can remove the outer wall and foam to make it smaller on the outside, or you can replace the foam with cement (don't use sand if it can freeze)to help it not float away. You can buy these new for about $7.00 or sometimes used for $1 or $2 at garage sales, Goodwill, or Salvation Army. If you buy one used, make sure it still has its silicone seal.

 

medoug.

Edited by medoug

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I know that I'll hate myself for saying this, but most of the pretzel/PB jars that I've found seem to have fared well. Though none of them have been out there more than a few months.

Medicine/aspirin containers do not do well, unless in a protected environment. (I have a medicine container under a fence post that has done quite well for six years...)

Lock & Lock brand seems to do quite well. Imitations (Rubber Made, ProFreshionals) do NOT do well.

Spring for the Lock & Locks. They're not that expensive. Under $5.

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I use these plastic jars that used to contain chicken and beef consommé powder. As the powder needs to stay dry, the containers' cap screws on tight and keeps the moisture out. Problem is that I only empty a couple of these each year.

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I replaced a peanut butter jar this year that had been a cache for five years. The lid broke. It was in a shady spot but had no camouflage on it and was completely exposed to the elements where it sat (on top of an old rail road piling). Prior to the lid breaking it was never wet inside. Peanut butter jars are my favorite recycled cache container. This year I've found tried and true containers of all types that are wet inside. Including ammo cans, decon containers, and lock-n-locks. Every cache need to be maintained.

 

The issue I've seen with ammo cans are the hinge pins can corrode over time and snap. Happened to one of my ammo can hides. The can was out in the wild for 3 years before the pins failed.

 

Decon containers - the lids are hard to snap down.

 

Lock n locks -- not all lock n locks are real. The dollar store variety looks the same but seals poorly and the tabs snap off easily.

 

Also the environment matters. I hear that lock n locks in the desert (Sonora, Mojave, etc.) don't last long - but that would be true of most plastics. Ammo cans are probably the best bet for desert environments.

 

This frustrates me! I have one decon container that I bought because they seem so rugged and watertight. Almost every time I check it there is water inside because the lid hasn't been snapped on all the way, which is tightly.

 

There aren't that hard to close, I don't understand why it's constantly left loose.

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Decon containers - the lids are hard to snap down.

 

 

This frustrates me! I have one decon container that I bought because they seem so rugged and watertight. Almost every time I check it there is water inside because the lid hasn't been snapped on all the way, which is tightly.

 

There aren't that hard to close, I don't understand why it's constantly left loose.

 

It's been my experience that the lid seems to be on completely but with a little more of a push I feel/hear that snap and realize that it really wasn't on all the way. You might try mentioning in the cache description to 'push until you feel the lid snap in'. But, unfortunately, not everyone reads the cache descriptions.

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Any container that is durable and will seal tightly should to. If a peanut butter or peanut jar, mention of this should be made in the listing for those with allergies. The pretzel container should do nicely but will need to be replaced every year or two as the plastic gets brittle. Camo tape can help slow degredation, but you may wish to leave one side open so the bomb squad can peek in at some locations. Pill bottles with screw-on caps also do for smaller caches. Coffee cans and similar with snap-on lids do not do well as pressure changes will pop those open.

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You might want to wrap the plastic jar in camo tape so the sun doesn't break down the plastic too quickly.

 

I have a PB container that I have wrapped with camo fabric that I picked up from Fabric Land, and glued it on using Weldbond glue. It doesn't have the same glossy appearance as tape, and picks up some of the dirt and debris when placed on the ground, which helps make for a more natural camo. I have it in a hole in a tree that fills with water often, and it has been out for 6+ months with no issue.

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Can reused containers work? Yes most can work in certain ares for at least a few months. Just rmember this containers are designed for indoors so they may not hold up to a wider range of temps, sunlight, snow, rain, etc. You also have to make sure you give it a good cleaning so animals and bugs will not be attracted to your cache.

 

I've seen very few pill bottles actually stand up to the elements and for the size I'd rather spend $1 on a matchstick container that is designed to take a beating and will last years.

 

I HATE any container where the neck is smaller than the body. Logs, and swag get stuck in them a lot.

 

Containers to avoid: Altoids tins, M&M bottles, any snap on lid (these are made with flimsy plastic and break/crack), aspirin bottles, glass containers.

 

Containers that are ok: pill bottles, some 35mm film canisters

 

Containers that do fairly well: big plastic jars

 

A really good container that will stand the test of time will cost more on the front end, but it will be easier to maintain and you won't have to replace it every few months or year.

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I've used the large peanut jars on a couple of caches one of them was in the open for 3 years with no problems, the other has been out almost 8 years and is ok.

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Decon containers - the lids are hard to snap down.
This frustrates me! I have one decon container that I bought because they seem so rugged and watertight. Almost every time I check it there is water inside because the lid hasn't been snapped on all the way, which is tightly.

 

There aren't that hard to close, I don't understand why it's constantly left loose.

It's been my experience that the lid seems to be on completely but with a little more of a push I feel/hear that snap and realize that it really wasn't on all the way. You might try mentioning in the cache description to 'push until you feel the lid snap in'. But, unfortunately, not everyone reads the cache descriptions.
Yeah, a lot of the decon containers I've found have been only partially closed too. I won't use them. Large beach safes are about the same size, and are much easier for people to seal correctly.

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One thing to add to the good discussions above. We have a lot of ammocans and prefer them for any hide. But we placed two caches in a park where the land manager requested that we use only clear plastic. If you know where you want to place your cache you might want to check if the person giving permission has any special requirements.

 

It's also true that where you live makes a big difference.

 

Good luck with your first hide!

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My 2 cents - I don't like the pill/vitamin containers as the logs can be REALLY hard to extract from them. The log in it's baggy tends to fill the entire cavity of the pill container, and doesn't like coming out the smaller opening easily. Hard not to damage the baggy or it's log book. Especially if people have put other small trade ables in the container also.

 

I prefer containers where the opening is the same width as the rest of the container - especially for small containers. The less maintenance you have to do as a CO the better!

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I've made a couple recently with marshmallow creme jars. They've come out with some plastic ones that are great shapes, screw on lids, seemingly made for geocaching. Paint the top and cover the jar with camo duct tape=ready to go! Plus the rice krispie squares were yummy!!!

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Decon containers - the lids are hard to snap down.

 

 

This frustrates me! I have one decon container that I bought because they seem so rugged and watertight. Almost every time I check it there is water inside because the lid hasn't been snapped on all the way, which is tightly.

 

There aren't that hard to close, I don't understand why it's constantly left loose.

 

It's been my experience that the lid seems to be on completely but with a little more of a push I feel/hear that snap and realize that it really wasn't on all the way. You might try mentioning in the cache description to 'push until you feel the lid snap in'. But, unfortunately, not everyone reads the cache descriptions.

 

I used decon containers extensively when I started geocaching, until I got sick of replacing wet logs. It wasn't just a matter of people not closing them properly. The lids on many of them simply don't seal well. When the lid is closed properly there is some play in it on most of the decon boxes I've owned. That loose fit allows the water to enter. I've replaced all of my decon box caches over the years because they simply didn't do the job. I still have several out there that I use for middle stages of multis, but all they have to protect are laminated coordinates in a plastic bag, so even if water gets in its not an issue.

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I've used a PB jar as a "small" container. I put the log inside a small pill bottle (with a mechanism to get the log out).

I rinsed the caches with bleach beforehand and painted it with Krylon Fusion.

 

I can't say it's the best container in the world, but my wife was more comfortable with it than other options and it fit in the location well.

 

EDIT: I should mention that most of the decon containers I find are wet inside.

Edited by d+n.s

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A Soup thermos, plastic or stainless steel works great. We buy them for fifty cents to a dollar at second hand stores. They work great, & are water proof.

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Hey, peanut butter jars aren't cheap! Lol

 

I agree though. Ammo cans are the best! You can get them for $6 bucks a can at the geostore on the east coast of FL. They have an online store too. But shipping makes them come out to something like $18 a can.

 

I use ammo cans in ares where there are controlled burns (like Myakka Forest). They survive fires!

 

Ammo cans do not survive fires. The rubber seal in the lid turns to charcoal, or burns away completely. The can itself may survive, but it is no longer waterproof, not to mention the fact that the logbook is now ash and the Mc Toys are a giant glob stuck to the inside of the can. I've marched four of them out of the mountains after the fire died down, and threw them right in the trash.

 

As far as household containers, I've made a reputation with spice containers, those with a screw on cap. Cover them with cammo tape, or paint them, and you're good to go. I have never had one leak, and the cammo protects them from the sun.

 

People go to Walmart and buy Hide-a-Keys, (Which I think is worse than a black film container), when a spice container is 50 cents. I've bought them, dumped out the spice, sanitized them and went and hid a cache. I have probably hid over 70 of the things, going back to '05. None have failed.

Edited by Don_J

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I have used asprin, vitamin, and PB containers with great success. When using this type of container, make sure to place it appropriately. I place these containers off the ground (to keep snow, etc. out of them) and as much out of the elements as possible. It is a good idea to place the log in a zip-lock baggie within the container for extra protection. As with any cache, make sure to monitor the logs for any signs that the container requires attention and maintain it. Following this, you should be fine with the pretzel container!

aspirin325.jpg

The thing about aspirin containers or any jar where the neck is narrower then the body, it can be tough getting the logsheet out of the container.

 

...make sure to place it appropriately...As with any cache, make sure to monitor the logs for any signs that the container requires attention and maintain it.

 

Good advice.

 

A "Ship in the Bottle" cache. They drive me crazy. I just threw one in the recycling bin, (Vitamin container).

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I use these plastic jars that used to contain chicken and beef consommé powder. As the powder needs to stay dry, the containers' cap screws on tight and keeps the moisture out. Problem is that I only empty a couple of these each year.

 

Actually there are more ways than putting the container out and having the cachers try to sign a moldy wet lump of pulp for a log.

 

Put a piece of kleenex inside the container and a rock, and sink it in a bucket. Leave it overnight. In the morning check and see if the kleenex is wet.

 

I am really glad of the containers I have invested in, rather than used junk that doesn't hold up.

Edited by Sol seaker

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An UNUSED specimen jar makes a very good smaller container. Most nurses can get you some of these.

 

That is funny I am a nurse and have 2 different specimen containers sitting on my desk. Just behind my lap top for when I am ready to hide my first cache. Along with a travel bug and FTF pin... and some swag. Just have not gotten enough confidence to hide it yet.

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I use these plastic jars that used to contain chicken and beef consommé powder. As the powder needs to stay dry, the containers' cap screws on tight and keeps the moisture out. Problem is that I only empty a couple of these each year.

 

Actually there are more ways than putting the container out and having the cachers try to sign a moldy wet lump of pulp for a log.

 

Put a piece of kleenex inside the container and a rock, and sink it in a bucket. Leave it overnight. In the morning check and see if the kleenex is wet.

 

I am really glad of the containers I have invested in, rather than used junk that doesn't hold up.

 

The sinking a container test is not a good one. I've tried many containers that passed this test but failed miserably in the real world.

 

When you sink a container the water pressure can create a better seal than the container will ever encounter in the outdoors where expansion and contraction due to temperature changes can compromise the seal.

 

A better test would be a shower test where you alternate hot and cold water and constantly change the position of the container. This is closer to what the container will experience outside.

 

In the end however trial and error is the best method. Even with that I've encountered the widely acclaimed ammo boxes with soaked contents and perfectly dry caches in containers that I thought no way could this thing have stayed dry for many years - but they did.

Edited by briansnat

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The sinking a container test is not a good one. I've tried many containers that passed this test but failed miserably in the real world.

Good advice. The testing method I employ is as simple as my feeble brain could think up. I just toss it outside. I've got a small patch of shrubbery by my front door that gets sunlight about 60% of the day, any rain that comes by, and occasional soakings from my sprinklers. If a cache keeps the log dry for a few months, under those conditions, I feel fairly confident that it will hold up in whatever swamp I drop it in.

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The sinking a container test is not a good one. I've tried many containers that passed this test but failed miserably in the real world.

Good advice. The testing method I employ is as simple as my feeble brain could think up. I just toss it outside. ....

 

Toss it outside -PLUS remember to open it-close it, open it-close it.

 

Many containers, closed, with a clean opening will be dry and stay dry outside for a long time. But once they get repeat open/close cycles they'll fail. If they're in contact with dirt and water, they'll fail faster. If people stuff a bit too much stuff into 'em they'll fail super fast.

 

I was gifted a stainless steel coffee mug, wide mouth, with threaded lid. Looked like a pretty good cache container. I hung it in a tree and forgot it. A year later, it was dry. I noticed it, and put it on the ground by the back door, and tried to remember to grab it and open and close it occasionally. A few weeks into that, it was wet.

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The sinking a container test is not a good one. I've tried many containers that passed this test but failed miserably in the real world.

Good advice. The testing method I employ is as simple as my feeble brain could think up. I just toss it outside. ....

 

Toss it outside -PLUS remember to open it-close it, open it-close it.

 

Many containers, closed, with a clean opening will be dry and stay dry outside for a long time. But once they get repeat open/close cycles they'll fail. If they're in contact with dirt and water, they'll fail faster. If people stuff a bit too much stuff into 'em they'll fail super fast.

 

I was gifted a stainless steel coffee mug, wide mouth, with threaded lid. Looked like a pretty good cache container. I hung it in a tree and forgot it. A year later, it was dry. I noticed it, and put it on the ground by the back door, and tried to remember to grab it and open and close it occasionally. A few weeks into that, it was wet.

 

This is true of the knock-off (dollar store) lock n locks. At first they seem just as good as the real thing but open and close the tabs 30 times and they start to break off.

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As far as household containers, I've made a reputation with spice containers, those with a screw on cap. Cover them with cammo tape, or paint them, and you're good to go. I have never had one leak, and the cammo protects them from the sun.

 

People go to Walmart and buy Hide-a-Keys, (Which I think is worse than a black film container), when a spice container is 50 cents. I've bought them, dumped out the spice, sanitized them and went and hid a cache. I have probably hid over 70 of the things, going back to '05. None have failed.

 

A local hider has hiden a good number of PB jars and spice containers and they seem to have held up well, but they've only been out a year. It's good to know they have long term success as well.

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I've encountered the widely acclaimed ammo boxes with soaked contents and perfectly dry caches in containers that I thought no way could this thing have stayed dry for many years - but they did.

 

I once placed a Slim Bob - a small camo taped baggie, a pathetic excuse for a cache container. My intent was to get back fast and replace it. 4 years later, I archived and removed that Slim Bob - bone dry.

 

I've seen large pretzel jars, out for years in the dirt, dry, prescription pill bottles, dry.

Lock and locks, wet, soaking wet at times....yep, it's a conundrum.

 

There are a couple of moderately prolific placers of PB jar caches around me. Some wet, some dry..

 

I still try to place ammo cans whenever possible, as being the cheapest likely option, fewer maintenance visits, and the most satisfying find - heck even if it is burnt or wet, the finder has no doubt they found the cache.

You can't say that about most homegrown plastic containers.

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Lock and locks, wet, soaking wet at times....yep, it's a conundrum.

 

I have had this happen to some of my real (not knockoff) lock n lock hides and each time it was because the baggie got caught in the seal.

 

baggie-stuck-in-locknlock-s.jpg

 

Some of my lock n locks have gone commando now to prevent the problem. Especially the smaller ones where you would have to squeeze in the baggie to make it fit.

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